‘Laowai Style’: Beijing Foreigner’s Remix of ‘Gangnam Style’

Jesse Appell in 'Laowai Style' remix of PSY's 'Gangnam Style' filmed in Beijing, China featuring the lives of foreigners in China.

On Youku:

Laowai Style! “Gangnam Style” Remix

This video was filmed at various places [in Beijing] including Tsinghua University, the Drum Tower, and the Bird’s Nest and emulates “Gangnam Style”. The video features what life is like for us foreigners in China, and I hope everyone enjoys it!

You can follow big brother’s [referring to self] weibo. I won a Chinese scholarship this year specifically to come to China to learn xiang sheng and Chinese comedy: @中美幽默桥 [“China-USA Humor Bridge”] http://weibo.com/2998923647

I especially want to thank the Fulbright Association and the Chinese Government Scholarship for providing the funds to research comedy, as well as the IUP at Tsinghua Chinese Program, all the performers, and the support of friends from various countries!

Jesse Appell in 'Laowai Style' remix of PSY's 'Gangnam Style' filmed in Beijing, China featuring the lives of foreigners in China.

This video was created by Jesse Appell, an American and Brandeis University student, who explains:

This year I am in China on a Fulbright research grant, where I’ll be spending a year in China studying Xiangsheng with Ding Guangquan 丁广泉, Da Shan‘s Xiangsheng teacher, and trying to learn how to connect China and the Western world through humor and cultural exchange. In addition to Xiangsheng, I also think popular media has great power to serve as a bridge between cultures and I’m thrilled that this video took off like it did!

Comments on Youku:

adugs:

Not bad, maybe if it was a little more professional, the sound is a little uncomfortable [not mixed well].

熊怡:

Haha, indeed. The dancing skills need to be improved but the lyrics aren’t bad!

Yep, I think only a foreigner who has lived in Beijing long-term could write [these lyrics]. Sigh, too much “horse-riding dancing” lately!

二成(小生):

I like this kind of laowai, the reason is because they’re willing to learn China’s culture, integrating themselves into this country. The laowai where I live has been in China for 10 years and only know two phrases of Chinese, “ni hao ma” and “xie xie“. They’re in China only to make money.

葛建峰 sam:

Haha, Tsinghai’s foreign students sure have nothing better to do.

d1renjie:

Now this is what a remix/adaptation is!

黄馨:

This laowai‘s Chinese singing is truly very good, and its rapping too~~~ niubi

Avalon有一天:

The inside-the-subway scene couldn’t have been easy, how’d they find such an empty subway car…?

wuyegr:

I want to say to Youku, stop putting so much of this bangzi garbage music on the homepage, okay???!!!

小强闯天下:

His Chinese is much better than Jay Chou’s

Juno加油:

Yun, one of the lyrics is a laowai who crosses the street without waiting for the red light to turn green~ a Chinese characteristic, haha!

我不是陈冠希:

Haha, I like, this laowai is quite funny!

zhuweix:

This is what happens when you live in Beijing and breathe in severely over the limit PM 2.5.

jiajiameiyouxiao:

Idiots! He’s ridiculing/mocking our China!

海南广州桂林:

Laowai Style, worth three laughs! He he… he!

Elinor1981:

Do you know this handsome guy? I think “laowai is a very amiable form of address, and normally only Westerners are so amiably referred to as laowai, whereas Koreans and Japanese don’t get such a distinction.

SandrineWu:

种,老,外,囧了。 Do they know what 种 is?

丘井力:

I personally think this Style is even more interesting than the original one!

小清唇:

Every time I encounter a laowai who knows how to type pinyin to chat with me online I always think they’re really perverted and scary.

293580:

This laowai must be over HSK Level 6…

✿ 吳東桀`灬Elroy:

I saw myself and my classmate in the video… in the Bird’s Nest part… Had I know, I would’ve gone and danced with them too…

ASSTRA赖正浩1312806280:

Laowai also like to listen to Gangnam Style. Today when I went to the gym, there was a Canadian who kept choosing that song to exercise to.

邓士杰:

Compared to Psy’s original MV [music video], China’s subways have a lot more people, haha~~

杨卫星:

In Western culture, they dare to try things, dare to change things, dare to show off, not like our culture.

丘井力:

Yeah, and what more, that laowai really understands/knows China! Support!

冷不丁v:

Not bad, video isn’t bad, and the Chinese is even better. And the video has a lot of views on Youku too. Jia you!

杨禹婷 aNna:

Hahahaha, creative -____-“

陈星丞Xcheng:

There’s scholarships for this? I want to apply too…

范嫣淼:

There is cause to suspect it was dubbed by a Chinese person, and it’s obviously singing about Chinese people’s problems, what’s the meaning of this?

TTdreams:

I was just talking with a friend about traveling to another country and the tour guide there saying that if we saw anyone running a red light, the person would definitely be Chinese… and I come back and see this video… This phrase “crossing the street without waiting for the red light to turn green…” … Truly embarrassing…

MMlu2:

Truly talented~!

刘晓斨:

Mentally retarded laowai style.

bigway:

Yeah…the girl in green looks pretty good~

丶雅er:

Although it isn’t particularly well made, it’s still extremely great~~~ Praise~~~

王卐小恆:

I think this would make a better promotional song for Beijing than “Beijing Welcomes You”.

小萌爱骑独轮车:

Not sure why but watching this made me feel really disgusted…

贾红军:

I’m truly in awe, this song is universal, I’ve seen nearly a hundred versions now.

王癫儿道长锄田去也:

Of all the versions I’ve seen, this is the one I like the most!!!

邓元婧:

Even though I fell apart/lost it twice, I still managed to finish it, hahaha.

何文祥:

Has definitely understood the essence/spirit of this song, niubi!

littlerices:

Haha~ Is it only laowai who can be so relaxed/carefree while in school?

Many of the comments were Chinese netizens simply repeating the “heeeyyy… laowai lai le” and a few other lyrics in amusement.

What do you think?

Jesse Appell in 'Laowai Style' remix of PSY's 'Gangnam Style' filmed in Beijing, China featuring the lives of foreigners in China.

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  • red scarf

    Sofa style!

  • hess

    “What do you think?”
    That they should lose a whole lot of weight

    • bert

      But not the black girl.

    • elizabeth

      I think it’s the widescreen.

  • red scarf

    I’m thinking who’s he mocking himself or the Chinese character

  • Germandude

    “In Western culture, they dare to try things, dare to change things, dare to show off, not like our culture.”

    If the guy who posted this understand that it’s up to him to change it?

    • Well, I would hope he can distinguish “daring” from a fucking embarrassing load of dullards who dress up like twats and act like complete dicktards to look “whacky” in the vain hope that they might seem even slightly interesting, and that all cultures have something to learn from each other, but there’s fuck all to be gleaned from these wannabe hipsters.

      • Fraser Stewart

        Amen brother.

        • ilbon18nom_555

          hear hear.

  • moop

    i kinda hope this guy gets beat up

    • grovesman

      He probably was many times back in the USA. Typical western misfit who finds China more accepting of his “nerdy style.”

      • 老二

        well, he’s over here with his university and tsinghua to study comedy and cross cultural comedy. I don’t think this is the ‘typical western misfit’, who you most likely are.

        • hess

          two bucks says youre jesse

          • Yeah, I’ll also take a piece of that action. Put me in for 13 kronor.(Is that about 2 bucks?)

          • hess

            youre in. is the dollar that low now? damn..

        • grovesman

          LOL…My comment had nothing to do with his wonderful accomplishments.

          My comment centered on my opinion that he looks like a nerd/geek and was probably bullied while in the USA school system. My comment also referred to what I consider many foreigners (westerners) that are here who were most likely “misfits”/social outcasts in their home country and find the Chinese more accepting of them than they could have possibly imagined being in their respective homelands.

          But hey, you got me…I’m a total misfit.

    • Ruffled Feathers

      Would make an awesome story on tomorrow’s China smack: Laowai style gets bitch slapped.

    • John

      I kinda kinda hope this guy (moop) gets a clue…

  • Donnie

    he spelled ‘shit’ wrong

  • Jeff

    testing 1,2,3,4

  • Jeff

    I think the guy in the blue shirt was the AV monitor class in my high school. he got his ass kicked often if I remember correctly.

  • moop

    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=jesse+appell&oq=jesse+appell&gs_l=youtube-reduced.3…490970.498682.0.500687.12.12.0.0.0.0.1049.5802.1j0j1j2j1j1j3j1.10.0…0.0…1ac.1.aBGwqycKd-o

    uhh, i really hope this guy gets beat up

  • Brad Prichard

    Blech. Got about 30 seconds into that and had no choice but to capitulate.

    • If “capitulate” means barf then maybe…….31 seconds for me. What a fucking doof.

      • Brad Prichard

        I made some wanking motions at the screen. Then vomited.

        • John

          You wank to this?…I guess whatever works for you buddy.

  • elizabeth

    Bravo! Standing ovation! Who says ‘laowai’ is offensive?

    • hess

      ever heard a rap? lots of “nigga/nigger” in those

      • elizabeth

        It’s not the rap, it’s the fact that he does not care if ‘laowai’ is offensive or not. I enjoyed the performance. And I am also a laowai and don’t mind being called one.

        • Xiu

          I got used to ‘lao wai’ long ago, you kind of have to, being outnumbered so much. Kinda like if you are the only black man living in a community of 5000 white people and being called ‘coon’ or whatever. But at least the black dudes responded with style and panache… this guy is just a total douche, trying to cash in on a phenom/meme. This kind of guy makes me wish I was born black.

          • elizabeth

            I think a lot of racists will ultimately give up if only their targets would turn the other direction instead of responding to racist remarks, which is what the racists hope to achieve…which further encourages more racist remarks. For them, it’s almost like a fetish to get a kick out of agitating people.

            Words are only words until we react to them. It’s foolish to let ourselves be manipulated by sick racists.

          • matterh

            why is my reply to elizabeth not here anymore??? its true the words laowei and hogwei are not offensive!

          • elizabeth

            I think it’s because you can’t even pronounce them right :)

    • Nick in Beijing

      Please refer to the pissing contest of a “debate” in the thread about the Russian for further reading.

      • elizabeth

        Awww…Nick. Be a sport :). Honestly, I ignored that post because I knew exactly what the ‘debate’ would be about.

        • Nick in Beijing

          I gave up trying to discuss with Nanny Hiccups, it’s much easier just to take the piss and let her make an ass of herself.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            urrr… why are you randomly talking about me in some random topic? Ur weird!

          • elizabeth

            Bunny, don’t think your book will do very well if ‘weird’ is the only advanced vocabulary you use. That’s not the way to do research for a book either.

            Please stop trolling. I am beginning to see why some guys are picking on you in return.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            im contributing more than one word to the co nversation. huh?? What are you talking about? Ur weird!

    • red scarf

      Hip-hop black gangsters sing “nigga” Does that mean its not offensive, a little Chinese kid smiling happy and waving saying nihao laowai, can’t convince me its a bad word. A car passing with a bunch of Chinese teenagers shouting laaaoooowaiiii and laughing menacing can’t convince me it is a good word. Both of which have happen to me…. We will just have to wait to see how the word usage of it evolves…

      • elizabeth

        Precisely, it’s the intent of the user, not the word. ‘Laowai’ is harmless by itself. It depends on the context but, somehow, ‘laowai’ has been construed as offensive almost every time it is mentioned here.

        • grovesman

          There was a wonderful write-up about the word Laowai a couple of years ago (can’t remember the source). Certainly intent has a lot to do with whether one should be offended or not. But if one is trying to become immersed in the culture and trying to become part of the community, it is disconcerting/disheartening at the very least.

          According to the article, when laowai is broken down into historical context, the word means “always an outsider.”

          As for me, I don’t even care anymore. As the saying goes…”You can call me anything but don’t call me late for supper.”

          • Bunny Hiccups

            what a healthy attitude! There’s nothing wrong with being called an outsider! Seriously, what’s wrong with that? It’s just a word, everybody has the right to use any word they want. Those laowai are so weird!

          • elizabeth

            Ok Bunny, I’ll be your guinea pig for once. Grovesman did not say there’s nothing wrong being called an outsider or whatever, but it is just that he doesn’t care.

            And yes, that is a great attitude because more often than not, people take offense because they feel their sense of being is threatened and therefore it is a natural reaction to get even to reinstate or affirm their self-image. Those who don’t care, I would say, are confident enough to know that mere words from others do not change who he/she is.

            But there are times we must care to put things straight if it leads to misunderstanding otherwise. However, I do not see the need in the case of ‘laowai’. In fact, as I understand it, the Chinese use ‘lao’ sometimes as term of endearment (can’t think of a better word) or when they are comfortable to be casual with someone. In that sense, it is in effect a compliment.

    • red scarf

      OPhs sorry Eliz …didn’t see other comments you made,..

    • Ruffled Feathers

      Laowai is offensive because calling someone ‘foreigner’ is divisive, as if to say “you cannot be like us”. This is a mentality that Western societies no longer have. Chinese are just too ethnocentric/xenophobic/ignorant/racist… to change. Now I’ll agree that Chinese mostly don’t mean to be rude, but they still ARE rude when they say this word to us. Just because they are ignorant and insensitive, they shouldn’t be exonerated of blame.

  • donnachadh

    This guy is researching humour?

    • hess

      ba-dum-tss

    • bert

      How in the hell can anyone research ANYTHING in China. The land of no mirrors or open doors. Don’t they just ‘learn’ what the CCP allows them to ‘learn’? In the end they are just doing stuff but not actually creating anything that means squat. I could be wrong and would like to hear more about this.
      Chinese humour? Give me a break. Just a bunch of sound effects, BOING! Will they allow him to study ancient pre1949 dirty jokes?

      • donnachadh

        I believe the set text on his course id Mao’s Little Red Book.

      • snicker

        Research just takes time and perseverance…anyway, it can be done…

        • bert

          Yes, but who controls the research material? I think a person can learn more about Chinese culture (humor, whatever) by living here for a long time and talking to real people rather than going through this country’s educational facilities. They (CCP) just don’t want anyone to see or think anything that might be a negative reflection on China. I just want to know if these scholars are really given full access to what they want to study?

          • snicker

            Well, this is a possible difference between ‘research’ and ‘study in an institution’. Like researching anything in China, researching culture and history requires development of connections and trust in order to gain access to materials. Foreigners tend to believe that this is “all about the CPC” simply because foreigners mostly can’t or don’t put in the time or effort to make the connections (this can be a lifetime mission). Although many materials were destroyed during the cultural revolution, many things have been recollected in institutions. Foreigners can gain access and trust by first establishing an understanding of what Chinese nationals are thinking, then introducing their own concepts based on materials they have access to outside of China.

            Of course, all this requires the scholar to understand cultural nuance and language of past times, which also require years of study. Chinese scholars generally need to take you seriously as a scholar before they will have a serious conversation with you (or even pick up your phone calls).

            In China, most information can eventually become available. As they say, in China, anything is possible, but nothing is easy. You need to know what you have, know what you need, and be able to barter and trade across every aspect of a relationship…

          • Bunny Hiccups

            if you all really understood chinese culture as much as you claim you do you wouldn’t come to chinasmack and complain so much.

          • snicker

            What relevance does understanding a culture have to complaining about it when you’re in the middle of it? Understanding does not necessarily breed happiness!

          • Cynic

            ‘Understanding does not necessarily breed happiness’

            the opposite me thinks.

            why are so many idiots so happy?

          • Bunny Hiccups

            It breeds acceptance.

          • bert

            Okay, but these Fulbright kids aren’t going to spend the next 20 years building up connections in China to do research for a thesis. So in the end they are just wasting time? At least that what it seems like.

          • snicker

            And maybe some of your tax dollars, my American friends?

          • Fraser Stewart

            The CCP long ago banned comedians from discussing two major topics. Sex and politics. There are many 相聲 routines, classic ones, that are based on both. I seriously doubt that he’s allowed to study either. This is the main reason that Dashan quit doing Xiangsheng, because he was limited only to certain topics, not free to explore the comedy to his full potential.

            That’s why I suggest people watch Taiwanese Xiangsheng, that is much closer to classic Chinese Xiangsheng than the mainland version. In Taiwan there are no banned topics, because they actually have freedom of speech. As a direct result, the quality of the material is significantly better than say, discussing how people sneeze.

          • ane92

            I’ve had a few Chinese people who were very well educated (in China) who constantly asked me questions about China because they knew what they knew a lot of information simply wasn’t available in their school.

            With the recent dispute over the Daiyou Islands I’ve had a few people ask me for updates on what’s going on simply because they know I use a VPN and read foreign news websites instead of Chinese websites.

            Anyways I do think 100% that if you’re studying in a Chinese University and only using material providing at the school then there is no way you have full access to all the information out there….no way at all.

          • Chom

            your very well educated friends don’t know how to use VPN themselves?

          • ane92

            Oh I’m sure they do (actually I thought the same question you just asked whenever they say something like this). I think they assume I’m more in touch with that Americans are thinking though, since I’m from America I tend to know more popular websites and communities on the web than someone who’s never been to America. etc etc.

            In summary I think they just assume that I’m more connected to America’s current views than they can be/are. And I’d have to agree with that to a certain extent.

      • Fraser Stewart

        Even 大山 stopped doing Chinese comedy because he realised how fucking awful it was post CCP. Try watching Taiwanese 相聲 it’s actually really funny.

  • Nick in Beijing

    Am I the only one who noticed that even in THIS video they still managed to slip a Japan reference in the comments?

    • bert

      Yes, you are the only one who noticed.

  • snicker

    In spite of all ye naysayers, I think it’s kind of fun. You could have done a lot worse remixing Gangnam Style for a laowai in Beijing… Thumbs up!

    • (shakes head) snicker, snicker, snicker…….say it ain’t so :(
      Seriously, I’ve have been repulsed by a song this much since “Safety Dance”.

      • snicker

        Maybe I’ve been here too long? Amused by simple stuff now? Well, anyway I think it’s not easy to put together video, even if it’s geeky…so, I gonna say “it just so”. Anyway, isn’t the song still stuck in your head? Da ge lao wai style!

        • Nah….Safety Dance. Oh shit…..now it’s My Heart Will Go On. Thanks Canada!

      • John

        Hmm. You’re repulsed by the song, yet you still chose to click
        on the link…Interesting. Self-hating much?

        • Yeah,…..interesting. Considering I never even heard the original “Gangnam Style” ,clicked on the link and gave it an unbiased chance and after about half a minute thought to myself “good god, what shit!” and shut it off. Explain how that is self-hating, you presumptuous fuck.

  • Snazzy_Brett

    White people speak Mandarin on camera and Chinese people always rave about it. A lot of us speak Chinese, your language isn’t as hard as you think it is.

    Every video goes viral, no matter how terrible.

    • hess

      阿门

    • Fraser Stewart

      Actually it’s exactly the opposite. Chinese is one of the easiest languages in the world to learn. It’s far more difficult for a Chinese speaker to learn English than the other way around.

      For example, Chinese does not have any of the following:

      -tenses
      -plurals
      -regular and irregular verbs
      -infinitives
      -conjunctions
      -almost no punctuation

      I can’t think of any more now, but I could go on. They always go on about “Chinese is the hardest language in the world”, a load of fucking bullshit. Just because it’s got characters (ooh scary), and tones (yeah those are real hard to learn), they think it’s fucking impossible for a foreigner to learn how to speak it.

      I think the worst part for me though, is speaking to locals, like waiters. 90% of the time it’s not a problem, but then you always run across that smart ass, asshole who pretends not to understand what you’re saying.

      E.g. you say “我要一瓶水”, dead simple sentence. Then they give you this look and go “huh?” Fuck you, you know exactly what I said, but it totally upsets their world view that a 老外, managed to master even one simple sentence of their sacred language. Fucking get over it.

      • bert

        I hate when they nit pick on me about the tones :( Then they go off talking with a mouth full of marbles.

      • Ruffled Feathers

        Well, I have a theory about this. You see, in the mid-Qing period, it was considered a crime if a foreigner learn Chinese. China also has a very introvert attitude to the world outside, as we all know. It is fair to assume that Chinese is so (supposedly) complicated, because they didn’t want foreigners to learn it. I guess that plan failed.

      • linette lee

        Chinese is really easy to learn? I always find that very amazing when people tell me that. I think English is easier to learn but harder to master due to grammar.

        Chinese is harder to learn at the beginning, but it’s easier to master? No past tense and no grammar. No?

        • Snazzy_Brett

          linette we talked about this before. Mandarin is one of the most simple languages I can think of. I cant speak for Cantonese, but English is by far more difficult.

          Past tense is easier because there is no conjugation or change in pronunciation. Just add “le” and you are good to go. Of course, I am simplifying things for the sake of posting on my phone, but verbs dont outright change. ie “go=> went”. “qu=> qule”.

          • Cynic

            yes but in English one can say ‘now I went store to’ people will understand it as ‘now I’m going to the store’. In Chinese if you say Shang Dian xian zai qu wo le’ no one will figure it out. Chinese is inflexible and ancient.

            The order of words in a sentence messed me up for years since I did no studying. I found Japanese a lot easier to learn the basics of.

            I can’t comment on learning English though since it is my first language.

          • Snazzy_Brett

            Hmmm, good point, I havent really considered that. I guess I handed it to Westerners generally trying to understand what you say more than Chinese people try. I disagree about Japanese. Like Korean, which I am learning now, the subject object verb structure is much more difficult for native English speakers.

          • Cynic

            I think it is mostly about the schooling here. Cause the nation has such a problem with illiteracy (I mean speaking Chinese correctly – dunno the proper word) they hammer over and over in Chinese class how things are to be spoken or structured. This rigidity doesn’t leave any room for understanding when the promo citation or order is messed up.

          • linette lee

            I will say English has 26 alphabets. You just put the letters together and you sound it out. So pronunciation is easy. You can’t do that with mandarin. No sounding out. It’s just dead memorization. You have to memorize each word. No grammar neither. So I don’t know which one is really harder English or Mandarin. I can tell you cantonese is really really hard to learn. It has 7 tones. People use a lot of slang words when they speak cantonese. Like instead of saying “You all should be there.” they say “yo all gotta be there.” So many slang that It sounds like rock in your throat when we talk. No a easy language to learn.

          • Jahar

            Mandarin has maybe 300 syllables. Very very easy to master. Tones make it a little tougher.

          • snicker

            So basically when learning different languages, you put different things in your throat?

          • moop

            oh those poor, poor linguists

        • Fraser Stewart

          If you’ve spent a great deal of time studying English grammar, as I have, you’ll know it’s a total mine field. If you buy any two of the major grammar books out there, you’ll find that they contradict themselves all the time.

          People who study grammar seriously are constantly debating this or that. For example, when using quotations, does the punctuation go inside or outside the quotation marks? Should we put a period after a contraction? Are split infinitives ok? I could go on and on.

          Chinese has almost none of these problems. With Chinese the rules are the rules. Simply learning the rules means you could speak Chinese almost perfectly, that is not true with English.

          • Cynic

            is this punctuation correct Zhejiang spectacular machinery star butterfly fortunate mould enterprises co., ltd.

            I could never figure out the co., ltd.

          • Fraser Stewart

            Yes, it’s correct. A period must follow a contraction if the final letter of the contracted word is not the same as the original word.

            In this case the original word is company, the contracted word co., so a period must follow the co.

            The comma here indicates a pause between company and limited. I’m not entirely sure it’s necessary, but I don’t think it’s wrong to have it there.

          • bert

            Also, shouldn’t every word in a name be capitalized? :)

          • linette lee

            I can never master English. I gave up long time ago. They have rules but tons of exceptions. I think Spanish makes more sense than English. English should revise and follow Spanish more. It will be easier for the new learners.

          • Ruffled Feathers

            Your English seems pretty good to me. However, your comment about changing English to be more like Spanish is ludicrous. There’s a reason why English is the international language, and why Spanish isn’t.

          • linette lee

            Spanish words are pronounced exactly the way you spell it.
            Like ma-ri-po-sa or man-te-qui-lla. You won’t get your spelling wrong. It’s exactly the way you hear it. English however….ka-ra-te or
            o-n-e?????
            Spanish you just follow the rules of conjugation. There are exceptions but not too many. Like voy, vas, va, vamos, van compare to irregular digo, dices, dice, decimos, dicen.
            So it’s “where do you go?” or “where do we go?” A donde vas? A donde vamos? It’s straight forward. You have past tense and other tense too. Just follow rules. The nouns you have masculine and feminine. They have singular and plural also. It’s also pretty straight forward.
            Spanish is not easy but the rules are straight forward.You just keep practicing and you can actually master it. Not English.

            So they should revise English and make it more like Spanish.

          • Snazzy_Brett

            linette, in Spanish a double L (ll) makes a “y” sound. Spanish doesn’t sound everything out at face value either.

          • linette lee

            That’s the spanish phonic. They don’t say abcdef, they say ah be ce che de e efe, The ll sounds like y. The h is silent. The j sounds like h. They have ch and ñ and rr. Spanish is a very beautiful language. Very efficient. I would love to move to Spain to live a few years.

          • Snazzy_Brett

            No, Spanish uses a “y” as wel. Both “double L” and “y” can have the English “y” sound. You cant write everything as you hear it accurately, although it is more accurate than English’s use of the Latin/Roman system.

          • linette lee

            si, yo soy una mujer. Y sounds like y.

            I am pretty sure spanish writes almost entirely the way it’s pronounced. Go ask a spanish person. :)

            Where is that annoying puma guy. ;)

          • Bunny Hiccups

            I can speak spanish (used to be pretty fluent) Y can sound like Y or “E”. Like the word “and” is simply “y” which sounds like “e”.

          • Snazzy_Brett

            Right, but the long “E” sound alone, is always written “y”. However the English “y” sound can be represented by both double l and y (I hope, for the sake of not looking like an ass).

            Either way, it doesnt really matter.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            Yes, that is true – double LL makes a Y sound. The alphabet when it gets to the Ls goes , k (kah), L (el-lay), LL (a-yay), M (“em-may”), N (in-nay), N (has a symbol over it, re: INYAY), O (oh), P (Peh), Q (Coo). R (Air), (air-ray), S (essay)… etc. So that “Y” sound we hear with the double LL is that double character between L and M on the spanish alphabet.

          • linette lee

            si, nanny y nick estan enojado.

            My spanish suck big time…hahaah..lol.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            yo estoy no muy enojada! nick es muy feo y gordo! Nick es un puto maricon chenga tu madre pendejo! el es muerte! mi espanol es no muy bueno

          • linette lee

            pendejo y maricon are very bad words. hahaa …lol.

            You speaking chinese must be funny, like me speaking spanish. My spanish friends laugh so hard. My double rr is so unnatural. Sounds like a cat got stuck in my throat. hahah…lol.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            yeah my mandarin is so bad. i was looking at an old youtube video i made a year ago just now where i tried to tell a story without using english. i tried to say 6 months and i think i said a word that sounded like months (to me) and it was totally wrong so the whole sentence was nonsensical. i can’t pronouce TODAY (Jin Tian) i said “GE-EN TEE-EN) or something like that. it’s beyond bad lol. i can say zou tian or ming tian but cannot say jin tian.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            linette, want to see a sad youtube video of me trying to speak mandarin when i was first learning? It’s actually funny looking back on it. i tried to tell a story without speaking english lol

          • vincent

            Hey Brett how is everything with the baby?

          • Kate

            I was wondering that too. If you’re wife is a week over due, I feel for her!

          • Snazzy_Brett

            and @disqus_3ntu2nOx6o:disqus, 7 days over due and no sign of contractions. Sooo stressful. I just want to meet my baby girl!!!

          • That happened with my daughter…3 false alarms and more than 2 weeks overdue when some lady suggested my ex-wife eat a whole box of Ex-Lax (or some kind of laxative) and BABOOM! Worked like a charm(no shit-baby jokes about my daughter….she’s a very nice girl)

          • Snazzy_Brett

            Good to know @disqus_MNq4X1kYc4:disqus , thanks for the advice. I am going to try and slip some into an ice cream sundae tonight!

          • Kate

            Mi espanol es bueno :) Estudio espanol para tres anos en escuela para mi profesion :) pero mi coreano es mal……mucho mal :(

          • Duke

            I agree. English is not that hard to learn, however Spanish is easier. When I moved to America it took me about a year to be able to speak, read and write the language. I have been in China three years and still can only speak basic mandarin. When I moved to America I learned English in school and here I have been teaching myself, maybe that’s the problem but it stills seems a lot harder to learn mandarin. Also my mother language is Spanish and I wouldn’t mind it becoming more popular ;)

          • linette lee

            @duke, I am pretty sure your chinese is better than my spanish. :)

          • Ruffled Feathers

            Why does any language need to be changed to suit those people who simply find it hard?

          • linette lee

            revise and improve no? I think Cantonese should revise and improve too. Too many slangs and improper sentences. Don’t make sense.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            english is the standard because britain and then america were the dominant cultures. at one time, spain was the dominant culture which is why all of south america, and mexico speak spanish (the language of their invaders).

          • Ruffled Feathers

            I know. That’s the point. English has become culturally dominant in the world, and most people seem to accept that. Linette’s argument to suddenly change English would not be accepted by so many.

          • El Puma R.

            Let’s agree on the fact that English is still a relatively young language as it is.

        • The Enlightened One

          I agree with you Linette. Chinese is extremely difficult at first but becomes a lot easier as you learn the sound patterns and can decipher the different tones.

          English is a lot harder to master because it has a lot more influence from other languages/cultures. So in order to TRULY master English you need some knowledge in various other languages.

          For example, when I taught English students would always screw up the word “Chef” and instead say “Chief”. I told them the reason it makes more of a “SH” sound than a “CH” sound it because word borrows from French. All of these small bits that break the patterns of English it what causes the difficult in advanced mastery.

          • linette lee

            word “Chef” and instead say “Chief”

            enlightened, exactly, it’s like just when I sort of understand the grammar and spelling, then it comes exception. I get confused.

      • Cynic

        I find talking to the uneducated much easier for me. They seem to be better at problem solving what I am trying to say. They are used to hearing bad Chinese. The educated ones have it bulldozed into their head that an item or concept or feeling etc… can only be said one way.

        I think the waitress not understand is because you blew their mind haven spoken Chinese and they simple forgot or blocked out what you said.

        • Fraser Stewart

          I did say it’s almost never a problem. But there’s always that once in a while irritation that pops up. There’s also the guy who talks to you in terrible English, despite having just spoken to him in fluent Chinese.

          • Cynic

            fuck!!! Don’t get me started on those assholes. It’s like ‘sure waste my fucking time practicing your shit English’. It’s one of the most inconsiderate day to day things I run into. If it is just to practice hello or where are you from I frustratingly don’t mind but when it’s a mateer of consequence I go bananas.

            Two people should communicate together in the most understandable efficient manner.

          • John

            Yeah. Know what you mean. It really irks me.

            I just tell them I’m French, and can’t speak English.Then, continue in Chinese. lol

          • Fraser Stewart

            I once told a woman I was German, so she started talking to me in German. So the next time it happened I said I was Swedish. The woman reeled back like I just punched her in the face. She had no clue what to do.

      • Beijinger in Beijing

        I bet you have a ridiculous laowai accent when you speak Chinese.

        • Ruffled Feathers

          No matter how much you troll everyone on here, the fact is, when you wake up tomorrow, there will still be hundreds of thousands of foreigners in China. It’s not going to change, we’re not going to go away, more and more of us are going to arrive here in the future, and there’s nothing you can do about it. Now go and think that over.

          • linette lee

            China should give out dual citizenships through legal immigration process to foreigners so they can come in to work and pay tax to china gov’t. But of course just like USA, they can also refuse your application of immigration.

          • Nick in Beijing

            He gets a throbbing headache every time he sees a foreigner hooked up with a sweet Chinese lady. Then he goes home and takes a cold shower to stop feeling the shame between his legs (assuming he showers at all).

        • Snazzy_Brett

          What is a “laowai accent”? Having lived in Hunan for some time, I can honestly say that most Han Chinese (in the mid-west/ southwest) accents are farther away from standard Mandarin than many laowai’s.

          • Beijinger in Beijing

            well, yeah, but laowai accents are different from regional accents, just like a southern accent is different from, say, an indian accent. laowai accents tend to sound funnier.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            right, because whiteys are so smart that they speak chinese better than chinese people… lmao! Ur so weird!

          • Snazzy_Brett

            Bunny you arent going to pull me into a race flamewar. Troll elsewhere.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            Im having a conversation just like everybody else you silly chicken head! ur so weird!

          • linette lee

            can some one please do a video on “bloggers chinasmack style” everyday ya’all troll’ng

        • en

          Honestly, most foreigners, who are perfect in terms of the correct vocab and grammar, still have a foreign twang to their pronunciation. I’ve met less than a handful in 7 years that actually sound “Chinese”.

      • linette lee

        Whenever cantonese people speak mandarin, they get made fun of. It is very discouraging. I can under like 60% of what they are saying. The pronunciation of some words are not so far off when put into sentences. You can still figure it out.
        Meanwhile, the mainlanders speak Cantonese with such a heavy accents. They sound very bad too. I can barely speak mandarin though.

      • Alex

        So much this, mate.

        Sometimes you’re speaking to someone when they’re not looking, and they agree, answer you and have a conversation. Then poom, they turn around and they put this retarded idiotic face “UH!!?!?!” and start nto understanding anything you ever say again.

        So freaking retarded.

        • Fraser Stewart

          I think the funniest part for me is when I’m actually with a Chinese friend, or several Chinese friends. For example I work in the maths department of Xi’An Jiaotong University, and some of the people here don’t speak English.

          So I go out with a few of them to do something, and I say something to one of those guys. But he still pulls the whole “huh?” crap. Like dude, my Chinese friends, who also heard what I said, understood it perfectly but you can’t?

          So then my Chinese friends will repeat what I said, and he understands it. It doesn’t just happen in China, it happens in Taiwan too.

          I remember one time I was out buying tea from one of the local tea shops. In Taiwan, they sell iced tea, and they’ll ask you how much sugar and how much ice you want. I said to the guy 全糖 meaning “maximum sugar”, you can also said 正常甜 which means the same thing. Despite repeating both phrases, very slowly, very carefully at least 10 times he still insisted on saying “半糖” meaning half sugar.

          I kept 不是半糖,是全糖, over and over again, and saying 全 as slowly and carefully as I could. In the end he gave me 半糖. I told my gf at the time the story. And she said “you need to improve your pronunciation”, but when I later explained that I’d said it slowly and repeatedly, she said “yeah, that guy was an asshole”.

          • David Pitts

            Hey Fraser
            I can empathize – That drives me insane as well.
            I hate it when they see you aren’t Chinese and yell “Ting Bu Dong” before you’ve had a chance to say anything to them.
            Cheers,
            Dave

          • Ruffled Feathers

            Yep, that ting bu dong shit hits me every time, don’t forget the requisite chuckle the add on after saying it. All you do is say wo nong ting dong, and it wipes the smirk off their faces pretty quickly, and they become flabbergasted.

          • Beijinger in Beijing

            pretty sure your pronunciation is bad breh

          • Fraser Stewart

            Except that never happened with anyone else, before or after. I went to tea shops in Taiwan hundreds of times and that was the only time I had that problem. Sure my pronunciation is real bad.

          • Beijinger in Beijing

            maybe you run into some people who just can’t understand the laowai accent.

          • Fraser Stewart

            In Taiwan they don’t use offensive terms like “laowai”, and I was told by many people that I speak Chinese with a mainland accent not a “laowai” accent.

          • snicker

            What, in Taiwan, I suppose “da lu” is the offensive term, just like “nong min” is the offensive term in Beijing…

      • Bunny Hiccups

        How does mandarin not have paste tense? If you say “le” doesn’t that make the preceding word paste tense?

        • Fraser Stewart

          In English tenses change the verb, e.g. “to go” -> “going”, or “run” -> “ran” and so on. In Chinese the verb 去 is always 去. You can add characters to it to change what it means e.g. 我去過.., meaning “I went…”, but 去 is always 去 and is always pronounced 去.

          Another good example is “I go shopping”, which is all wrong, you have to say “I’m going shopping”, in Chinese you just say “我去買東西“. So the “tense” of the verb doesn’t change the pronunciation or use of the verb.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            i think that makes it easier. one of the problems i had with spanish is conjugating verbs.

      • Jahar

        Sometimes I think it’s because they aren’t expecting you to be speaking Chinese, so they aren’t really listening. Also, waiters in China seem to be the most useless group of morons I’ve ever come across.

      • El Puma R.

        Yeah when they pretend not to understand I shout it on their faces “can’t you speak chinese?”

    • Beijinger

      It really isn’t, and it is frustrating to meet so many people that just can’t believe someone other than the genius Chinese themselves can speak it.

    • snicker

      It’s so easy, I think we should all start commenting in Chinese! 你先开始吧。。。

      • Snazzy_Brett

        Ruguo shouji hui dazi dehua, wo keyi kaishi… However, this is an English-speaking blog and I have argued it too many times before. If you want to test my Chinese give me your Skype I.D. and I will call you.

        • snicker

          I have no doubts of your oral Chinese. I have no doubts about many foreigners’ oral Chinese. I do have doubts about their written Chinese though. I’m just sayin’, beyond one-sentence blog spurts, 写中文还是有点麻烦。。。 By the way, what mobile phone in China doesn’t do the hanzi? Are you Hunan Brett (or Brett Hunan) of old?

          • moop

            他现在住在韩国,还 跟一个高丽棒子结了婚。 你连这个都不知道? 没你鸡巴事。 :)

          • moop

            but in all seriousness brett is right. this is an english site and most people posting chinese on here just want to show off

          • El Puma R.

            哎呀我操!

          • Snazzy_Brett

            哈哈@disqus_Yu9CRCs2Uz:disqus这个棒子有我的孩子!! 7 Days late, as of now. Waiting, waiting, waiting…

            @disqus_Ut1dgA8V7c:disqus哇! 好久没写中文! 不要找理由了,但我一般都忘掉了呀! 你说的对-写中文有点麻烦吧。Android doesn’t have any good programs to type Chinese characters so I’m stuck to using my computer if I want to reply in Chinese. And, yes, I am Brett Hunan.

            I agree with moop, most people who write Chinese here just want to let others know how awesome their skills are. I think a lot of foreigners speak/read/write Chinese very well. Just depends why you are in China and how hard you try. I went to China to study Mandarin to help find a job. Stayed another year because I liked it. I would be embarrassed if I hadn’t learned something. Had another friend who came to teach, all his friends and girlfriends spoke English so he never even tried to study. All relative to how you want to live while in China and what you want to do after.

    • K

      It’s easy to learn but it’s damn hard for a foreigner to pronounce Chinese well. i had an American professor who learned Mandarin for 20 years and he managed to mispronounce “we have been in the same school for 5 years” as “we have shared the same bed for 5 years” in front of a lecture hall of Chinese professors.

      • Fraser Stewart

        I don’t see how you could do that. School is 學校, bed is 床子, completely different. Could you write down what he said in Chinese, I mean what he was trying to say, and what he actually said.

        I remember when I was studying Chinese, there was a joke in a our textbook. A foreigner wanted to ask a question and instead of “Can I ask you something?” he said “Can I kiss you?” 吻, instead of 問. The funny part was in the story he said that to a policeman who replied “what’s wrong with you, I’m a guy and you’re a guy?”

        I liked that. Not only did they make a joke about mispronouncing a word, they managed to turn it into an anti-gay joke.

        • bert

          Is it anti-gay or is it just that 97% of the world aren’t gay and therefore the policeman’s reply is quite normal? I know what your saying. Gay people need to start sucking it up. haha!

          • Bunny Hiccups

            yeah why do we have to be so sensitive to gay people or anybody’s feelings? gay is just a word, stop being so PC! UR so weird!

          • bert

            A joke is a joke. Everyone should be fair game as long as they are not retarded or physically disabled.

        • moop

          maybe he pronounced 睡觉 and 学校?

          • hess

            still, you got to be a retard to mix up j and x after 20 years, heck even after 2 months

    • Maitiu82

      Heh, imagine a viral video in the US of “OMG!!!! Yellow person can speak English!!”

    • Jahar

      Is it they think it’s hard, or just that we are all idiots?

  • El Puma R.

    I hate the original version already so I don’t need to spend precious time of the last year of my third decade watching this shit.

  • Appalled@everything

    Good for you! Next time mock more aspects of Asian culture, and in general, mock more Asian cultures please.
    But seriously, this is the very essence of lame.

  • Cameron

    The original video song Gangnam Style really isn;t that funny in the first place.
    This however is a piss poor unorginal parody of a song thats already a parody. Scarcely a line or image in the whole song raises a smaile let alone a laugh. And he whole Laowai thing is stupid and not cleer. Why is it that all the foreigners in China who love referring to themselves and other foreigners as “Laowai” seem to be fucking assoles?
    “Laowai” is a name which many Chinese, having lived in undeveloped backwaters there whole life and therefore totally unaware that there are 200 countries out there beyond China’ borders, use to distinguish between themselves and, what are to the best of their knowledge, are the foreign hordes.
    While the name isnt offensive in itself, the Chinese habit of referring to foreigners as “Laowai” rather than enquiring as to their actual nationality, their name, or God forbid, just treating them as a normal human being is pretty ignorant. Likewise the common practice of grouping together all other countries and cultures under the umbrella term “Laowai” (or Waiguo) is also symbolic of a deep seated ignorance regarding the wider world.
    People who excuse China’s fondness for the term Laowai/Waiguo as merely a meaningless linguistic or cultural habit are mistken. Chinese are so fond of the terms “Laowai” and “Waiguo” as they clearly distinguish China and Chinese people from what they see as the multuitude of less important/remarkable foreign cultures/countries are very misguided.
    The ubiquitous use of Laowai and Waiguo is symtomatic of an ingrained ignorance toward the wider world in favour of a Chinese centric world view… The people in the video above seem to wish to play up to the Chinese stereotype of stupd foreign monkey, which is fine in tiself, although unfortunately it does rather keep the flames of ignorance and the beief in Chinese exceptionalism burning.

    • elizabeth

      Opps, sorry, I accidentally clicked the downvote button, my bad. Is there anyway to undo that? I’ll upvote you to compensate for that :)

      But I wanted to highlight that the original is now No. 2 on the charts…and given an accolade ‘force for world peace’ by the UN (although, I must mention…it’s from Mr Ban).

      • moop

        i think if you just click the downvote button again a second time it will undo it

        • elizabeth

          Ok, will try.

          • elizabeth

            No it doesn’t. Now I am doubly guilty! Will upvote again :D

          • Snazzy_Brett

            Your vote should be highlighted. Blue for upvote, red for downvote. If you vote down, then vote up, it will change automatically. No need to press downvote twice.

          • Jahar

            Brett, that deserves a down vote, then an up vote for you!

        • elizabeth

          Moop, you bad bad prankster.

          • moop

            but that really did work for me once

    • Beijinger in Beijing

      simmer down, laowai

      • elizabeth

        Is this a bait?

        • Nick in Beijing

          Yes it is elizabeth. BJ in Beijing is just trying to rile up the foreigners again. Pay no mind.

    • Duke

      Amen. I don’t appreciate being called by either. It’s a sign of ignorance that is commonly shown here in China.

      • Life in China is simplier in some ways without Chinese people always thinking of whether what they are going to say is politically correct or not.

    • Ruffled Feathers

      Absolutely spot on.

    • Cynic

      I have heard Chinese asking Chinese looking people if they were wai di ren. The terms Lao wai and wai di are shortcuts. Their next question would be to ask where they are from. If such interest exists. After which point they would be referred to as French person or Taiwan person or south African person etc… I don’t find it much different than an English speaker to just say refer to a group of Korean girls as those Asian girls. In north america it would be hard to have a blanket term applied like foreigner due to the relative level of cultural diversity And integration compared to china.

      I don’t completely disagree with what you wrote above. I just feel a tamer version would be more agreeable to my understandings and experiences.

      I did however enjoy the stupidity of the video. I don’t think it was meant to be good or original really. I thought he played on some stereotypes well in a sort of ‘look at the dumb lao wai’ style.

      • rollin wit 9’s

        calling someone asian is way different than just labeling them a foreigner. YOU may not find it much different but the latter makes that category of people much more vague. At least with ‘Asian’ I have some clue as to which part of the world they are from. Try that guessing game by labeling someone a ‘foreigner’. The blanket term in the US (when i was growing up) for anyone asian looking was Chinese. Especially if they didnt look like SEazn.

        • Bunny Hiccups

          i used to call all asian people chinese even if they were SEazn when i ws young and didn’t know anybetter. it also shows that chinese people are more famous than other asian groups. i was in the drugstore last weekend, and this lady walked up to me and said “excuse me, did you see that chinese lady come back here?” it was a customer looking for the asian girl atthe cosmetic counter, she was an employee.I told her “no, i did not see an asian lady back here”. She was clearly not chinese but hmong. americans are too stupid to know better sometimes.

          • Jahar

            China has a sizable Hmong population. They are included in the group, Miao, I believe

          • moop

            yep

          • Jin Ch’in

            Hows ur marriage with a local Asian going?

          • moop

            going great, better and better each day. thanks for asking brudda

          • bert

            I always ask Chinese what group they belong to. When they tell me Han I ask them how do they know? They just say their father or mother told them. How do they really know? It’s not like their family names are special most of the time.

          • ScottLoar

            Bunny, Bunny, baby. My wife is Chinese (Mandarin only, born in Taiwan but does not speak Taiwanese; relatives in Hong Kong but, again, no Cantonese; lives in Shanghai but no… etc.) and is too often approached in airports, hotels, grocery stores, Korean restaurants in China, Malaysia and even Korea by Koreans who insist on addressing her in Korean. When she replies in English that she’s not Korean and doesn’t understand the look of disgust and mutterings tells they don’t believe her.

            I tell her to reply in Mandarin.

            “Chinesa” is the common term for any East Asian in most of Latin America, even in countries like Brazil and Peru where the “Chinesas” are predominantly Japanese.

          • bert

            “azn”? Really? “Asian” is just two more letters. Did you really save a lot of time?

          • Jin Ch’in

            Bunny Hiccups apparently is a “writer” haha

          • CAPT. WE X-D

            AZN PRIDE BITCH!

          • Yes, bert …..and saying “mo” instead of “more” saves almost 1/1000th of a second. And using “po” for “poor” saves approximately .000000003 units of energy that can best be utilized for mo useful purposes such as making mo money.

          • donscarletti

            Are you from Boston? British and Australians also drop the terminal R and sort of aspirate the end of the vowel.

          • Nah….I come from the slums of Solvang, California where everyday was just like gladiator school but I survived.
            Actually,don, I think the accent of California is “no accent”.

          • donscarletti

            Most English speakers think of their own accent as being neutral. Speakers of languages with a clear prestige dialect (like Mandarin is to Chinese) don’t think that as often.

            Californian accent (apart from valley girl varieties) to me sounds more similar to Ontario, Canada than it does to the rest of the United States, I don’t know why.

          • Now that you mention it, I met with a fellow smackhead last week from Ontario and his similarity to my “accent” was uncanny. I just concluded “no accent” since in US there is no “California accent” that I know of whereas everyone is familiar with Midwest, Southern accent and New England accents and even regional accents such as Boston, New Jersey or New York accents and Texans have a distinct Southern-style accent. Chinese always tell me my English is easy to understand and I merely assumed it was because I had “no accent.”

          • donscarletti

            Hmong is a type of Miao which is one of the 56 ethnic groups of China. In fact, 2/3rds of them live in China. Did you ask that Hmong girl whether she was from China, Vietnam or American born or did you just take the opportunity to lie to the customer? (Hmongs are _all_ Asian)

          • Bunny Hiccups

            i don’t work at the fucking store why do i need to tell her anything. that’s poor peoples work! the hmongs in the state i live i are from no where near china, but from vietnam. we are heavily populated with them and other asian groups. the stupid cow didn’t know the difference between hmong and chinese.it’s retarded.

        • Do you think that Chinese people don’t think white people are Americans or Europeans? They do. Maybe if they called us “mei ou ren” or “xi fang ren” would that be better? I have noticed that for many Chinese people who seem to be interested in making friends with wai guo ren and treating wai guo ren special, they usually have a special preference towards white Americans and Europeans. To some degree that’s how Chinese think of “lao wai.”

          • en

            Or Russian. I get Russian 80% of the time, even though I’m American.

        • Cynic

          your right.

          i wonder what chinese call other asians or south east asians (for the exception of indians). if they refer to them mostly as lao wai or if they through some sort of competitive comparison refer to them as korean, japanese, indonesian etc.. instead of the blanket lao wai terminology.

          perhaps they really like to use lao wai for africans, europeans and north and south americans because they are not as good at distinguishing where they are from.

    • K

      Someone is taking a music video very seriously…

    • Maitiu82

      The use of “Laowai” constantly is pissing me off too. You wouldn’t see a video advertised as “Chink style”, and I haven’t yet heard Westerners referring to “Chinese-looking people” people as “Chink” or any other slur (even if it is a shortcut, or claimed that it used to be just an informal slang term).

      • hun

        doesn’t wang lee hom advertise his style as “chinked out”?

        • Maitiu82

          He does, but it’s him choosing to use the label. Non-Chinese in the US don’t refer to Jackie Chan’s work as “Chink acting”, and if they did, they’d get fired (as has happened with Jeremy Lin).

      • Bunny Hiccups

        what a silly laowai in this video. stupid laowai.

        • Nick in Beijing

          And the silly girl does it again!

          It’s a wonder how she didn’t realize she’s including herself under the heading of “silly laowai”.

          Can’t expect that level of reasoning from her though.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            im not an outsider anywhere! I am in my own home right now, you big stupid boo boo face.

        • El Puma R.

          Bunny hiccups you seem to enjoy your freedom of speech with a lot of ease despite of the fact that you are extremely frightened of the sole idea of putting a single foot in Chinese territory.

          • Cynic

            You have to forgive her though. she’s black.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            they are scarrrrrrry i don’t travel to uncivilized countries. america is just right. africa, middle east, china, and south asia and south america are places i would never ever visit!

          • elizabeth

            I dare to walk the streets of Shanghai alone past midnight, but never in New York.

          • El Puma R.

            Wow, I’ve been to most of the continents and believe I simply cannot be more proud of myself for living the life I live. You, Bunny hiccups , are a total loser. Believe me. America (which is short for The United States of America, that’s the real name of your country) is by far something very handy when it comes to complain, way easier to complain about the US than it is about China. Oh and I am sure that besides the fact of you belonging to the 50% of the US population, which is obesity… you are also a person with serious communication problems.

        • elizabeth

          Bunny you looking for guinea pigs for your next book?

          • Bunny Hiccups

            maybe maybe not ;)

    • I’ll present a bit of a different view.

      First, Gangnam style is neither really parody nor popular critique. It actually combines both, like a joke within a joke. The first joke is simply a very basic yet elaborate and stylish parody of the behaviour of people in Gangnam, and probably wealthy people in general. But the second joke is that the first joke doesn’t really matter, because after you are done parodying people driving around Ferraris and picking up random beautiful girls on the subway, they will still be driving around in Ferraris and picking up random beautiful girls on the subway. So is the joke on people in Gangnam, or is it on the people not in Gangnam? That’s what takes it from simply a clown act to brilliance in my view.

      Second, the key question is really, how much can you expect of people? I can absolutely agree that it’s a laudable characteristic to be interested in people from other nations. But China is a very large country, and most people are typically preoccupied with their daily lives. I’d say that spending time and effort in getting to know other countries is something you do if you have spare time and don’t have to worry about other things like surviving in your daily life. Talk to a street cleaner who works from sunup to sundown just to make enough for survival in the US or in Germany for that matter, and see how much they know about people who live further than 1.3 billion individuals away.

      Or to sum it up: It’s positive to be interested in other countries, but I can’t blame people a lot for not being so.

    • mac

      For gods sake people, get over it, the original song is a wind up of an area of Seoul that is rich, nothing else. As for this video, it is clearly a wind up of the uptight Chinese that would love to live in a western country. The racism I see on this site is incredible. To all the hater Chinese people, we in the west don’t care what you think. Get a life!!!!.

      • bert

        But if too many come over to the west then the west will stop being such a nice place to live.

  • wafflestomp

    It’s so easy to get e-famous in China these days. sigh…

    • linette lee

      I think that’s the key. People want to be famous on their blog. They go and make all these videos and get milllions view in hours. Especially in China.

  • Nilerafter24

    What an idiot.
    There you go again. Performing white clown looking for the recognition, that he couldn’t get back home, in China.
    However I do applaud his efforts since it’s not so easy to humiliate oneself so much.
    This guy has probably been here like 8 months and still thinks he’s God’s foreign gift to Chinese people, manifesting itself as a mediocre comedian.

    • vanilla

      totally agree with you :)

  • Fraser Stewart

    In Communist China, everybody acts like a total fucking idiot.

    • Ruffled Feathers

      Now that one was just too random!

      • Fraser Stewart

        You have to come up with some too. It can’t become an internet meme if nobody pitches in. That’s why I’ve been trying to do one for every article.

        • Ruffled Feathers

          Ok, how about this one. In Communist China, you can see better if your glasses don’t have lenses.

  • bert

    Fulbright. Is this really useful for people studying in China? China isn’t know for being open to anything. Aren’t these students supposed to be given access to real archives for their studies? Are they? I am ignorant on this and would like to hear a real (truthful) explanation of this.

    • Sorry moop, I flagged this as “inappropriate” by accident.(I didn’t know what the little icons did…..durrrrrr)
      I thought the Fulbright Scholars were picked by the President(of the United States) We had 1 here in Hangzhou awhile back and he was a smart motherfucker. But after watching this, I doubt if IQ helps you qualify.

      • moop

        you will pay for your insolence

      • bert

        Okay, but smart or fart what good does it do in China? Can they really learn something that isn’t total nonsense while they are in this country?

        • If he wants to learn about Chinese humour, I can teach him all he needs to know….for free…right here on Chinasmack. Jackass, fail videos and footage of people eating shit. They can’t get enough of that stuff. Back when I was a teacher I once launched myself off a trampoline onto a velcro wall wearing a velcro suit that I hadn’t tested. My home made suit stuck to the wall quite well but I didn’t think of putting any straps around my feet and my body dropped inside the suit resulting in an Atomic Wedgie x 10 and my balls being pushed up somewhere into my chest as the laughter raised to a fever pitch. Also, last week at a KTV in Taiyuan and got stuck playing “dice cup” and rolled 3 twos in a row and the hostesses laughed like it was the funniest thing ever. I throwing out pearls here so pay attention, jesse.
          You’re welcome.

  • Fraser Stewart

    You know, I’ve seen loads of these videos now. I mean shit loads of them. I really don’t understand why these people feel the need to do this. This just isn’t funny, it’s not clever and it’s certainly not special. Why not try and do something creative? Or maybe they are trying, and they’re just talentless morons?

    Either way, I really wish that China had a better moron detection system. Then people like this would either a: not get in the country in the first place, or b: not get any attention because people would recognise them for the fucking morons that they are. 大山 really has a lot of answer for, he’s the one who started this “foreigner on TV” bullshit.

    The thing that pisses me off more than anything is these people are just desperate to be famous. There is no way any of these people would make it to even minor “celebrity” status, if they were making say…youtube videos. Let’s face it, they are not the AVGN.

    • Ruffled Feathers

      You watch AVGN too? That guy’s the shit!

      • hess

        everyone and their mums does, and i just find him annoying

    • A Lu

      What’s even funnier is that there are people like you wasting their time watching “loads of these videos. I mean shit loads of them” and then complaining there’s people making those videos.
      Strange world..

      • Fraser Stewart

        Who says I actively go out and watch them? I’ve seen some of them on the TV screens in taxi’s for example.

      • Fraser Stewart

        Who says I actively go looking for them. I have many Chinese friends that I talk to online. Sometimes they’ll say “have you seen this video?”

      • Fraser Stewart

        I get sent the videos by my friends on qq. I don’t go online and actively try to find them and watch them. Usually I start watching, for about 5-10 seconds, then turn it off.

  • linette lee

    His Chinese is much better than Jay Chou’s………

    Hahaha….I want kill the person who made this comment. lol…. :)

    In USA, they have Everyday im shuffling by Imfao.

    In Korea, they have Gangnam style.

    In China, now they have Laowai shuffling style.

    What is the hong kong style?

    • en

      Jay mumbles, it’s a fact.

  • Wayne

    Would have been cooler if he would have remixed that one song to “They call me lao wai.. that’s not my name, that’s not my name”

  • Ruffled Feathers

    What’s with the Mexican wrestler dressed in hot pink?

    • Getrealson

      The nerd was offering a trip to the “all you can eat” buffet as payment for the backup dancers!

  • Jin Ch’in

    Laowai are nerds with poor cheap taste in fashion..clearly from the video. Compare to the very Chinese outfits i guess they look just passable as a human being.But who they kidding back in their own country they be laughed at! And that obese black person shouldn’t be wearing fabric that’s fluro and has lycra.

    • Cynic

      I hope hiccups doesnt read that one

  • Kate

    The girl in pink apparently eats a lot of white rice…..

    • John

      lol. Yep.

  • John

    Yes, because beating up old ladies, and making a silly,lighthearted video are ENTIRELY the same…

  • Kilkenny

    It’s the cheapest show you’ve ever seen
    with drunks drug addicts & old queens
    it’s garish gaudy cheap & obscene.

  • John

    While I don’t care much for the video (a very ordinary parody),
    I have no why some people here get so bent out of shape.

    I met Jesse last month in Beijing through friends.
    Really nice guy. Insanely smart too.
    He knows more about Chinese history and culture then 99%
    of foreigners in China. Heck, my chinese friends joked that
    he knew more than they did.

    He made a fun, silly video.
    I have no idea why this angers people so much.

    • Ben A.

      I have a bias being his brother, but from my experience I can vouch that he actually does know more about chinese history and culture than 99% of foreigners….seriously, I know this is the internet, people are going to be assholes, but nobody here sees the big picture about my brother at all. That’s all I will say – it’s not worth arguing anything more.

      • Kate

        Thanks for replying :) I personally thought it was a cute video!

      • Nilerafter24

        Nobody is saying that your brother doesn’t know Chinese or isn’t smart.
        The thing is, he chose a song that has already been parodied to death, and topics that have been sung about so many times by other foreigners in China.
        I mean, if does know as much Chinese and Chinese culture as you say he does, was this the best he could do?
        Go look at the video by Mike Sui on youku and a previous Chinasmack article where he imitates accents from China and around the world. Go read the comments. Everybody loved it because it was original and funny.

        If you post this kind of stuff on the internet, get ready for the criticism that follows.

        • Megan

          You’re replying to his brother; well, as his ex, here I go! “Best he could do”? It’s not like there was any goal to this. Gangnam Style is hysterical, and Jesse is ridiculous and just about the most industrious dude anyone has ever met. He had the idea for this and put it together the next day (literally. Filming took one day. 12 hours. That’s how silly). I’m gonna take this as a demand for more and better: I’ll pass it on to Jesse and see what he comes up with next =)

          So fucking proud of my boy. He’s doing great things; silly videos are just the most public of his projects.

      • Bunny Hiccups

        so what do you want us to give him? A freaking cookie? Who cares if he knows about china. there’s nothing important in that.

        • Ruffled Feathers

          To be fair, I agree with you on that

      • ane92

        Anytime something gets exposed to large amounts of people there will be those who like something, those who are indifferent, and those who dislike it.

        Of course you add the internet to that mix where you can speak your mind without showing your true identity the comments can end up being a lot more harsh.

        In the end all that really matters is if your brother had fun making this video. The goal of something like this should just be to have some fun and do something you like. Weither others like it or dislike it should be pretty irrelevant

        On a side note though….who cares how much history or culture he knows about China. That can easily come across as arrogant when people start talking about how much they know about a topic.

    • wahnwhaaa

      People love to hate 大山 too. People are always jealous when something relatively ordinary and inane makes someone famous. That’s just how the internet is.

      • Ruffled Feathers

        It’s not necessarily jealousy, it’s just there is a general mentality going around with some expats that believe that they are better than other foreigners because their knowledge of Chinese language and culture is superior. My Chinese ability, and my understanding of the culture is mediocre. Although I would like to improve myself, it’s not top on my list of priorities. Personally, I think that a lot of the culture here sucks ass, but also some of it is very cool. I want to stay here because I enjoy my job and I love my Chinese wife. It should not be a prerequisite that you have to be absolutely
        passionate about China’s language and culture in order to justify why
        you stay here.

        • wahnwhaaa

          Do you see any evidence to suggest that this kid thinks he’s better than you? It was a silly video with no patronizing undertones. I mean, I agree, but I do not see reason for that in this case (and there ARE plenty of evidence of expats lording their mediocre grasp of China over others).

          • Ruffled Feathers

            My comment was about the general issue of some expats who are arrogant about their Chinese. I agree, it’s not evident in this video, but you mentioned jealousy, so I thought I’d bring this issue up.

    • Bunny Hiccups

      wow, what a surprise, another whitey laowai claiming they know more about china than chinese. some of the others say they speak better mandarin while the chinese guy he talked to sounded like he had marbles in his mouth. the hubris and the cajones it takes to say this thing is actually pretty hilarious. i am flooooooooored, so amazing wow ! Ur so weird! :)

      • Kilkenny

        Another, erm, ebony laowai, who have never been here, pretending to know something about China while being completely retarded knowing nothing about China and Chinese. That’s more than hilarious.

        • Bunny Hiccups

          i don’t claim to know anything, except you laowai people are saying you speak chinese better than its native speakers! That is vewwy shocking you fuzzy wuzzy head!

          • desserts

            Come oon!!! ALL chinese people say that : wow your chinese is soo good, even better that some natives!!! wow wowow!!!!!
            and I know that it is just bulsh*t …. but
            Bunny Hiccups why laowais are saying they speak chinese better….becoz YOU chinese ppl say that ..lol :)

          • Bunny Hiccups

            im not chinese you silly pickle head. I’m just making an observation… now if you were in say america, and you walked up to an immigrant and said “wow your english is very good.” It would be cosidered an insult because it’s patronizing. so, in othr words, when they compliment your mandarin, they are saying, they didn’t expect a laowai like you to be smart enough to learn their language. do you not understand an insult when you hear one Ur weird!

          • moop

            when i first came to china i could barely say ni hao and i would still get compliments on how good my chinese was. anyone coming here trying to use the language at all regardless of level will get complimented at least once in their first week here.

          • El Puma R.

            I second that-

            My Chinese buddies here they say I am a true 东北人

            哈哈

          • Spod

            Of course Chinese people will say that to be polite – like maybe you do when others attempt your language. I am talking at an academic level – it is a fact that there is an “academic form” of any language that locals anywhere do not necessarily learn. Ever heard of Joseph Conrad?

          • Spod

            The official form of the language (pud hong hwa) is a formal way of speaking. It is not uncommon for foreigners to speak this better than locals, by their own admission. Like in the states you can tell were people come from by their use of the language – not just the accent. There is a “correct” way of speaking that a foreigner can pull off better than the local/s – heard it a hundred times.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            first, i thought it was spelt pu tong hua? Anyway, there’s no proof a local EVER said that to some random laowai, people don’t even talk like that in real life. I’ve heard many foreigners speak very good English but no one will ever say “wow, you speak English better than British people!” – personally just like Americans will never speak English as well as, or as eloquently a Brit. this is clearly demonstrative of the white man’s arrogance. “hey look, my whitey ass can speak chinese better than those little chinese chinks, even tho it’s their own language!” gtfoh.

          • spod

            Yep you are correct with the spelling thanks for that – copied and pasted off a site – my bad. If you had been there you would hear locals randomly complimenting others all the time even for a simple hello – it is a form of politeness – but that is not what I am talking about. To say it another way, I have heard many Chinese use a far better “academic” version of English than many English speakers – it depends on how you learned it.

          • themig

            yeah I speak english better than Laowei and i was not born in a laowei country. i speak australian accent better than laowei . ialso speak dixie-talk better than laowei north of cuba

          • spod

            I disagree – I some of my favourite speeches of all time have been performed by an American using “academic” language. Martin Luther King for example.

          • Cynic

            bunny please kindly remove your head from your rectum. When I first started reading your posts a day or so ago I was determined to ignore you; I did not want to outrightly reply to you and point out your crude nature. Alas I am at my witts end. You are ignorant, racist (strangely enough that usually does not bother me), malicious and worst of all pseudo intelligent. Kindly fuck off.

          • Jin Ch’in

            she is fat black and a woman enough said if that’s not bad enough its a fat black American who claims to be a “writer”

          • CAPT. WE x-D

            YOU LEAVE BRUNNY HICUPS ALONE FAGGOT!

            BTW GangnamStyle is a awesome song long the beat.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            whatsa pseudo mean? ur weird!

          • Kilkenny

            Okay, I will explain it for the last time, as you don’t have any concept of what “Chinese language” is.
            Firstly, it’s not a language in the common sense of a word. People throughout the China speak dialects which differ a little bit less than totally. People from the north, from Heilongjiang to Beijing barely understand Shanghainese and don’t understand Cantonese at all and vice versa. Chinese is not like English, which dialects differ from place to place, but still easily understandable, even for me, not a native English speaker. So it is true, foreigner, who speaks fluent Mandarin would be understood by anyone who speaks it, but a Cantonese peasant would hardly communicate with Chinese outside his province. So the guy, who told you some foreigners speak better Chinese (Mandarin, if you wish) has a clue.
            Secondly, don’t separate yourself from the laowai crowd. Just last time I was on a plane from Moscow to Shanghai, Chinese guy was talking on the phone (still in the airport), that he “hates this plane being so filled up with laowai”, and yep, that was in the Russian capital on board of a Russian plane.
            Even if you are in the US now, you’re still laowai to them, and they can easily call you like that on the streets of your town. Surprise, buttsecks.

          • bert

            “Firstly, Secondly”. I hate that just as much as when they say clotheses and monthses. :)

          • Bunny Hiccups

            i am aware of the dialects, and that cantonese is a completely different language, fuckhead. you said you speak chinese better than chinese. when you say “chinese” you are referring to mandarin. I am aware of the difference between the beijing dialect and that one needs to speak standard mandarin in order to understand each other. If you are going to say you speak mandarin better than people who are native cantonese speakers, then say that. But don[t say you speak mandarin better than the native mandarin speakers because you are full of shit if you think you do.l

          • Ruffled Feathers

            You talk about racism/ignorance a lot, and this is a general response to what you often talk about on here. Not to complain about anything you’ve been saying yourself, your rhetoric in defence of the Chinese WILL NOT be reciprocated over here. They will call you 黑鬼 on sight, I am sorry to say. I was like you once, always defending China, believing they could do no wrong, but since I came to live here, my attitude changed almost immediately. I once had an African American female colleague, who couldn’t stand it after a few days. People here would photograph her constantly, and try to grope her hair and skin. This is the treatment you’ll get here as a black person. You really should come here and experience it for yourself, I guarantee you’ll see out point of view very quickly.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            trust me, i don’t like them and i am not defending chinese! I am just pointing out the arrogance of these white laowai which is very off-putting! i have to call them on their bullshit even if it means i have to defense those people to do it. otherwise, i don’t really care about them. i just think it’s completely absurd to say you speak a language better than its native speakers.

          • Kilkenny

            Actually, I wrote a reply to you, telling what Chinese language really is, but I don’t know where has he gone. Anyway, I scrolled through your replies and made a conclusion never to talk to you again as you are stupid racist ignorant NIGGER bitch. Do not want to hurt black people feelings, but there are black people and there are dumb niggers like Hiccups.

          • Cynic

            What if a yellow Lao wai made the same claim? Would you raise the same stink?

          • Bunny Hiccups

            wha claim?

          • Cynic

            That they could speak better Chinese than a native

          • Bunny Hiccups

            only chinese can speak their language better than anybody, even other asians. even if the person is an uneducated peasant, you still will not speak better. that is how i feel. english is different because there are so many ways to speak it.

          • Ruffled Feathers

            ” i just think it’s completely absurd to say you speak a language better than its native speakers”.

            Please refer to my reply to you elsewhere about why some foreigners might have better Chinese than the natives.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            that was a bullshit reason, sorry. u learned to speak the language, yo are not a natve speaker. i will never believe that anyone can make those absurd claims. sorry.

          • Ruffled Feathers

            No it’s not bullshit I live here; I know what it’s like, you don’t, you’re just ignorant. Anyway, let me get this straight: By your own admission, you don’t like Chinese people. You’re also not in China and have no intention of coming here. Well, why do you even comment on here? What right do you have to make any opinion about China or what expats living here think of China?

          • Germandude

            Reading your posts with all those spelling and punctuation mistakes, I think many non-native English speakers do speak (write) a better English than you do.
            And then comes the point about the rubbish you are constantly talking. Do you believe in “-” + “-” becoming “+”?

          • Bunny Hiccups

            um ones writing is like a finger print. i prefer to write like this weeeeeee! Ur weird!

          • El Puma R.

            Bony Hippos:

            I am pretty sure that if you spend one single month in China you’ll leave it with enough reasons to stop being so moronic just because you have 2 hands, a keyboard, and IE 5.0. And I am also quite certain about you being someone who needs to comment here just because it might be the only place where people actually talk to you.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            i use aol 2.0 silly willy!

          • El Puma R.

            whatever you are still a worthless piece of shit with an extensively unused vagina who is crying for attention in a blog from a country she doesn’t want to know anything about.

          • El Puma R.

            you are a laowai too you idiot

            it’s like 小姐, please

          • Kukuku

            At least we probably all speak better English than you do.

          • Bunny Hiccups

            english is not my first language poo poo head

          • Cynic

            You’re full of shit.

          • Kukuku

            Quite obvious.

          • “Jive” is not recognized as a real language.

      • bert

        My Chinese sucks and my knowledge of its history and culture is limited. But I don’t care about it. If I want to know something on a certain day I will look it up. Culture isn’t all that. I find people use the word culture the same way they use the words “Our China”. It gets very boring. Throwing water on each other and dancing is about it. When you tell them a lot of veggies they put into their great and famous Chinese food wasn’t even in Chinese dishes until South America was ‘discovered’ they look at you like their whole 5000 year old culture collapsed. hahahaha

      • Kukuku

        Go back to AFFRRRRIIIICAAAAA!!!!

        XD

    • Who’s angry? Didn’t ruin my mood at all. (Refer to the comment by nilerafter24 below)

  • You remember those stories about people falling through sidewalks in China and being scalded to death by boiling water? Why hasn’t it happened to this guy? That would have made this video hilarious.

  • Getrealson

    This guy looks like an oompa-loompa with a longer body!

  • inbeijing

    hahahahahahahahahahahahaha

  • Bunny Hiccups

    some of the laowai responding to this topic claim they speak mandarin better than chinese people. how weird! never realized they are so superior to a billion people lols!

    • Fraser Stewart

      I don’t think anyone is claiming that. What is annoying people is some (note some, by no means all), Chinese people’s reaction to hearing a foreigner speaking Chinese to them. My Chinese is certainly far from flawless, and there are thousands of foreigners who speak a great deal better than me. However, my Chinese is more than adequate for what I need mostly, i.e. go to shops to buy things, go to restaurants and general daily life.

      Every now and then, maybe 2 or 3 times a week I’ll encounter one of the following scenarios.

      – Person gives me a horrible look and goes “huh?” despite the 20-30 other people who understood the exact phrase previously.

      – Person responds in English that is significantly worse than my Chinese. E.g. I go to McDonald’s and say “I’d like a Big Mac meal with a chocolate milkshake”, in Chinese. Guy replies “no, coco only”, or something similar, when it would been significantly easier to say “沒有巧克力奶昔,只有可樂“。

    • Ruffled Feathers

      Are you not aware that many of the people form the poorer classes of China do not know putonghua? As a result of the cultural revolution, many Chinese who grew up in the 60s and 70s do not have education higher than primary school, and even more recently, the generations that grew up in the 80s and 90s some of them came from poorer families who could only afford to send their kids to primary school. Therefore, the only language a lot of them know is the local dialect, not Mandarin. So to say that a foreigner has better Chinese than a significant number of the locals is not an unreasonable statement.

  • Fire

    Uncertain where to ask this, but how to view a disqus profile?. when the name is clicked, it open the current page again.

  • ShuangXi

    I didn’t watch the movie, both cause I’m at work, and I’m not really interested in a parody of a parody (though I like Psy’s original, I think it’s funny).

    Also, there is a lot of hate against foreigners who make Chinese internet videos here. While it’s easy to understand someone getting undeserved recognition (wow! foreigner speaks like us!), the truth is, students do this kind of fun/stupid/funny/retarded (pick one) stuff everywhere. College is just like that. Maybe even more so for a student on exchange.

    I’m not really fond of promoting the term ‘laowai’, though. I don’t mind it that much, but it still bugs me (as others said here) how 1) it lumps everything non-China into one group, and 2) it is still used condescendingly by some people.

    Dashan has a great writeup about the word if anyone is interested (he’s actually a really smart guy, I like to read his blogs sometimes)

    http://www.quora.com/Chinese-language/What-are-the-differences-in-use-between-laowai-%E8%80%81%E5%A4%96-and-waiguoren-%E5%A4%96%E5%9B%BD%E4%BA%BA

    One quote: “In some uses, laowai is clearly pejorative, for instance when used as an adjective. “You are too laowai” 你太老外了 literally means “You are too foreign”, but in fact carries the meaning “You are ignorant”.”

    Anyway, I don’t mind my friends using this word, cause I know they mean no harm, but I would rather not promote it and instead encourage using something less generalizing.

    • ShuangXi

      Also, they have scholarships to study comedy? WTF?

      • Fraser Stewart

        Study it in China no less. A country well known for great comedy.

    • Fraser Stewart

      As I said, in Taiwan (which I call “real China”), nobody ever uses the word 老外, they all say 外國人. That is a totally non-offensive word (and a natural one if you don’t know where someone is from).

      A few other differences between Taiwanese Chinese and Chinese Chinese. In Taiwan they never, ever say 漢語 to mean Chinese. The reason, not every Chinese person is 漢, so it’s got racist undertones. They use 國語 as in “the national language”, or 中文. These are inclusive words, i.e. everyone who is of our nationality uses this language. They also never say 漢字, but 文字.

      People might say “well what about English”, that’s totally different. Being English, is not a race, it is also a nationality. So the phrase English means “Language from the nation of England”, it does not have racist undertones. The Han are an ethnic group, so there is a slight difference there.

      That being said, Taiwan like everywhere does have it’s own problems with racial prejudice. However, they are much more welcoming of foreigners than China. In Taiwan foreigners are not always consider outsiders. E.g. if I got Taiwanese nationality I would be consider Taiwanese, and have an equal voice with people born in Taiwan (the right to vote for example).

      In China, you are always 老外, and you are always an “outsider” even if you lived here for 20 years. They never consider anyone foreign as “one of us”.

      • I recognise that you have very many years of experience living and travelling in China, but I feel your last sentence is quite negative about Chinese people as a group. I just want to say that when I have spent time with Chinese people there has been nothing to make me feel that I could not be as close with them as anyone of my own nationality. They have gone out of their way to be positive for no reason but good will.

        • ShuangXi

          I both agree and disagree with you.

          I have been here a very long too, and have a wide/large circle of friends that definitely treat me as one of their own and equal, so no argument there.

          The thing about ‘forever a foreigner’ is referring to outside your friend circle. ‘Forever’ may be a bit extreme, because China is changing. But for no, no matter how ‘Chinese’ you are, you are still a foreigner.

          I experienced this discrimination too, at my last company. Everyone knows that business in China is ‘different.’ I do honestly have a lot of hands on, successful, experience with this ‘difference’. Still most people at my previous job never even brought me to meetings regarding this stuff because ‘a foreigner could never understand’.

          Not to mention how @google-2b3f1f62922e2f893a0622b337193891:disqus said it’s ridiculously annoying when you speak perfect (and in case you doubt our Chinese level) very simple sentences and they look at you and just make a ‘huh?’ sound, not even bothering to say ‘What?’ just because they can’t fathom a foreigner speaking.

          I of course like it here, or I wouldn’t still be here, but I still don’t like to encourage this laowai-style of thought.

          • Fraser Stewart

            Yeah, I also have many friends here. My colleagues treat me as another colleague. I’m not talking about people who know me personally, but the people you don’t know, and interact with daily. For example, store clerks, waiters, bank tellers, and so on. Even just people you see in the street.

            Almost every day I have someone shouting “hello!” at me in the street. Or I’ll hear “老外” as people walk by me. It’s usually fairly obvious that I live here too, e.g. I’m carry a bag full of shopping, or I’m walking towards my office.

            The worst thing about the people who make the “huh” sound, is if you repeat it. It doesn’t matter how many times you say it, or how often you repeat it, they simply refuse point blank to understand you. Then a Chinese person (maybe even a stranger), will repeat the phrase and magically they understand it.

          • ShuangXi

            I really can’t stand that. Especially when I was still learning, it was demoralizing (Is my Chinese still THAT bad??).

            The worst was I was at a KTV recently with customers and just trying to make conversation with the girl (you know the kind of place) I asked ‘你是哪里的?’ (Where are you from?). I got a total blank. Tried three times more. Then I tried ‘你老家在哪儿?’ (Where is your hometown?). No success after multiple attempts. Try again ‘你来自哪里’ (Another way to ask where are you from).

            Finally I had to get out the cell phone and type it for her.

            “Oooooohhh. Wow your Chinese is really good.”

            I wanted to slap someone

          • Fraser Stewart

            Oh yeah, I’ve had that, so many times. That is one of the most annoying things in the world. You actually have to get your mobile out and type it. Then they say “你的中文很好“ (your Chinese is really good).

            I’ve had to do the whole multiple ways to say the same thing many times before. E.g. 你多大了? (how old are you), 你幾歲? (How many years are you?), 你的年青是什麼 (what is your age?) 你幾年出生 (which year were you born in?) I suppose it helps you get creative.

            I think the thing that really pisses me off is when you speak to them in Chinese, you’ve been having a long conversation (maybe 30 minutes to an hour), using nothing but Chinese. Then after all of that you write down your name/address or something (in Chinese). They look at you stunned and say “you can write Chinese!” Like, duh!

            Or they ask, having been talking to them in Chinese “can you use chopsticks?” No, I just live in China, but I never use chopsticks, ever.

          • ShuangXi

            Haha, I forgot the chopsticks one. I’ve been to dinner with people who have known me for quite a while, and know that I’ve lived here for even longer who ask me if I can use chopsticks.

          • Cynic

            I think it is okay to have stereotypes. how else do people make sense of the world if not by observation and assigning characteristics to groups.

            the chop stick thing is a little much though. it may lean more heavily towards the belief that all things chinese can only be performed by chinese.

            i would prefer if they had a little more subterfuge when displaying their intrest in chop stick skills. one japanese family was curious about my chopstick skills and said something along the lines of ‘you hold and use your chopsticks very beautifully’.

            the curiosity was vocalized and without offense.

            the chinese could learn a lot from their enemy. sure that has to be in the art of war. not sure its taught in school though since although there is the 5000 years of history thing, there is a very visible aversion to it beyond the bragging rights.

          • ShuangXi

            Which part of above is your ‘stereotype’ referring to?

            If you just mean in general, then I totally agree with you. The PR-ness of the US is getting out of hand, and a degree of stereotypes just makes sense (yes Americans usually talk louder than Europeans, yes Russians generally like vodka, yes black people are more likely to have an afro).

            If you are referring to the ‘laowai style’ then I retain my only partial agreement above, in that 1) yes we are different than Chinese, 2) it’s not usually offensive and 3) while I never actively chastise someone for using the word, I don’t like to see foreigners promoting it’s use

            I also have no problems (not even annoyance) that upon meeting or seeing me Chinese people don’t expect me to speak Chinese. That makes the most sense and is a logical assumption by most standards.

            But what the most… (what’s the best word?) annoying (doesn’t actually make me angry, but still) is when you have given PLENTY of evidence that you aren’t fresh off the boat (you’ve attempted talking to them in clear mandarin, you are having a conversation with someone else in mandarin right next to them, you are eating with chopsticks, etc.) that some people still have disbelief that you can do either.

            I guess you are right about ‘all things Chinese can only be performed by Chinese.’ The empirical evidence of an average Chinese person’s life does point to this.

          • Cynic

            your last paragraph made me giggle.

            stereo types in general and also about how foreigners cant use chopsticks. sorta meshed with the ‘all things chinese …..’ comment.

          • en

            Seriously, the chopsticks one is ridiculous ESPECIALLY after the people know you’ve been in China 7 years.

          • ane92

            haha the chopsticks one is pretty funny.

            i do understand the writing/reading one though. i know a lot of foreigners (myself included) who can speak Chinese on a certain level but can’t write or read it. He’ll I know Chinese students (pretty young) who still have problems writing Chinese.

            Anyways, in the end they are just trying to be nice and compliment you. It can come across as silly or annoying but there’s not any malice behind it.

          • fabulous

            You would have had to pay more.

          • Cynic

            how about when you ask them a question in chinese and then they answer the chinese looking person that is closest and in your group.

          • Fraser Stewart

            Then there’s the people who don’t even bother talking to you at all. For example you go to a shop to buy something. Rather than saying the price, they get out a calculator and just point at the number. Or turn the screen towards you.

            I once went into starbucks and was greeted in English. I immediately said.

            為什麼你對我跟對其他的人不一樣?(Why do you treat me differently from other people?)

            To which he replied “how am I treating you differently?”

          • Cynic

            the calculator thing pisses me off. the starbucks thing doesnt.

          • Cynic

            subway (sandwich place) is a different story entirely.

          • Germandude

            Ok, hold on a minute. The starbucks workers are actually trained basic english and required to have a certain level already. They talk Chinese to Chinese customers obviously and talk English to foreigners because many foreigners don’t speak the language. Especially in tourist areas, speaking English to foreigners is an essential to the company Starbucks here to make customers feel welcome.
            The guy talked English to you to make it easier for you to proceed with your order and sorry to say this, but I totally don’t get why you would ask him why he is treating you differently. He wanted to be nice and you got his intention wrong.
            Sorry to say it, but I find your question to the staff quite irritating if not even offensive.
            I can find racism, mistreatment in basically anything if I start searching with the intention to find it.
            Totally don’t get why you would complain in this case, sorry.

          • Fraser Stewart

            I don’t live in a tourist spot first of all, not even close. Secondly, I don’t know what the company policy of starbucks is, but I’ve actually spoken to the staff there at great length, and the ones in that particular store are certainly not trained in basic English.

            In fact, I have one of their workers on my qq list. We’re actually pretty good friends. She has a degree in law, but could only find a job as a worker in starbucks. The people in that store know me personally, and never speak to me in English anymore.

            I have seen other foreigners really struggling to make an order though, due to the staff’s limited English. I just feel it’s more welcoming to be spoken to in the local’s native language. You know “welcome to China”. Speaking to me in English is effectively saying “you’re a foreigner, you’re not welcome here”.

          • Germandude

            Ok, I don’t know where you are living but I have been to different places in China and even in the smaller cities (2 mio people e.g) I found that staff mostly have a basic english skill to run you through the menu. Personally, I found Starbucks staff to actually speak good English in general (of course I haven’t been to all Starbucks in China, god beware).

            From what I have seen most foreigners actually welcomed to be spoken to in English and making their orders easy.
            I just find it strange to criticize a staff for trying to make it easier (out of his point of view then) for you to order. If you just had answered in Chinese I bet he was bright enough to understand that he can proceed in Chinese. How can this not be welcoming?

            In many stores such as bakeries, cafes and small shops, the staff is only speaking German and loads of foreigners in Germany don’t speak the language and it’s rather irritating to see other German customers stepping in to help out getting the order done while it should be the staff’s job to be able to speak basic English considering they’ve learned it at least 6 years in school anyway.

          • Terrik

            Going to agree with Germandude. I think it’s rather normal for them to ask for your order in English first. A lot of foreigners don’t, in fact, speak Chinese well, let alone know the names of their favorite coffee in Chinese (I like my 焦糖咖啡星冰乐, thank you very much). When/if I go to Starbucks, If they ask me my order in English, I’ll respond in Chinese and 99% of the time they switch immediately to Chinese. Not a big deal.

            What DOES bother me is if I ask 多少钱?and I STILL get the calculator treatment.

          • elizabeth

            You mean when you bargain over the price of an item and they show you the figure on the calculator?

            That’s because they do not want others to know how much they are charging you. They charge different prices depending on how good/bad you are at bargaining.

          • Terrik

            No, I’m not talking about that. I’m talking about when I’m at a 全家,罗森 or some other supermarket or restaurant (where there is no bargaining) and I get the calculator/turn the screen around treatment despite the fact I asked, in Chinese, how much the bill was.

            I remember one particular time I went to a small shop in Shenyang to get something to drink and the woman and her family started at me for a minute in silence until I asked 多少钱?. They started to laugh, told me how much it was and as I’m walking out, I hear the grandmother saying “Oh yes, a lot of laowai speak really good chinese nowadays..” lawl.

          • elizabeth

            Yup, that’s uncalled for. It get those too. They are just being rude.

          • ane92

            I agree that it’s a bit annoying when you say something in Chinese and they still show you the calculator.

            In some cases I still don’t think they are trying to be rude though. In some cases they are though.

            To be fair though, I see Chinese people working at grocery stores that are just as rude to other Chinese people. They usually aren’t doing it to you, they are just a person who’s unhappy with their job and doesn’t have a good attitude. You can find cases of that in nearly any country where the worker is doing a low level/low paid/boring job.

          • snicker

            I personally think that the language used for the greeting should be the language of the land. I wish I were greeted with a huanying guanglin, but instead I get a “Hallo, whater do you want-e?” On the other hand, there is the (Confucian?) tradition of trying to save the other person face, and give them the opportunity to not mess up their Chinese by speaking to them in English first. Well, maybe it’s just a cultural difference and a different way of looking at service.

          • Jixiang

            I disagree. For one thing, most waiters in China absolutely don’t know any English at all. If you think they do, then that just shows you only go to the sort of restaurants foreigners often go to, or very fancy places.

            Secondly, what people complain about is when they do speak to a waiter in perfectlly good Chinese and they still reply in bad English. I can accept them speaking to me in English before I’ve opened my mouth, after all most foreigners don’t speak Chinese. Once I’ve made it clear I can speak Chinese, though, they should switch to Chinese. If they don’t I feel irritated.

          • Cynic

            Yup

          • fabulous

            First World Problem:
            Waiter won’t acknowledge my Mandarin skills in front of my friends.

          • elizabeth

            That may be your perfectly good Chinese is bad Chinese to them. Or, they don’t understand what you said. So they think they are doing you a favor by speaking in English.

          • Well no. My Chinese may not sound great, but I know they do understand what I said, since their English reply makes that clear, and my Chinese however bad is still better than their English.

          • El Puma R.

            lol I tell them it’s too late to welcome me

          • Chom

            @Fraser Stewart
            “I have seen other foreigners really struggling to make an order though, due to the staff’s limited English. I just feel it’s more welcoming to be spoken to in the local’s native language. ”
            So on one hand your saying there English isn’t good enough, on the other hand you want them to greet you in English (cause of course they have the ability to know you can speak Chinese just by looking at you even though the last 9 foreigner’s they’ve served couldn’t speak a word of Chinese)
            I agree with Germandude, what your saying doesn’t make sense and isn’t reasonable. It is very reasonable however, to first greet a foreigner in English if possible. I think you’d agree the majority of foreigner’s in China cannot speak Chinese. Judging from your other posts on this site, if they didn’t greet you in English, you’d complain about that too!
            When they greeted you in English, why not just begin to order in Chinese instead of being over-sensitive? I am willing to bet that if you walked into a starbucks in Taiwan, they would also greet you in English.

          • dave

            Judging from your other posts on this site, if they didn’t greet you in English, you’d complain about that too!

            Judging from his other posts, people in mainland China can do right.

            Gets a bit tedious to read.

          • Chom

            @Fraser Stewart
            “I have seen other foreigners really struggling to make an order though, due to the staff’s limited English. I just feel it’s more welcoming to be spoken to in the local’s native language. ”
            So on one hand your saying there English isn’t good enough, on the other hand you want them to greet you in Chinese (cause of course they have the ability to know you can speak Chinese just by looking at you even though the last 9 foreigner’s they’ve served couldn’t speak a word of Chinese)
            I agree with Germandude, what your saying doesn’t make sense and isn’t reasonable. It is very reasonable however, to first greet a foreigner in English if possible. I think you’d agree the majority of foreigner’s in China cannot speak Chinese. Judging from your other posts on this site, if they didn’t greet you in English, you’d complain about that too!
            When they greeted you in English, why not just begin to order in Chinese instead of being over-sensitive? I am willing to bet that if you walked into a starbucks in Taiwan, they would also greet you in English.

          • Fraser Stewart

            They sure do, it did used to piss me off a lot, now I pretty much ignore it and just talk in Chinese. What’s worse is when they insist to continue using English, despite the fact that my Chinese is clearly significantly better than their English.

          • red scarf

            Its the same as if I met an Asian person in the West should I start speaking to them in Chinese first? It maybe great for a Chinese person that a non-Chinese can communicate with them but as a Korean I would feel kinda pissed off a little. Its not rare for Westerners in China not understand English pass the point of hello.

            Hell, I have come across tea party scammers who even speak French and German to the tourists.

          • Germandude

            Well, I don’t know. I have travelled a lot in very different countries and because English is considered to be the most spoken language, English is the language that I got confronted with in most countries where people could see that I am not local because people simply assume the basics are there.
            In regards towards your example about Asians in the west. I would talk to them in English if they are not talking the local language.

            Assume a German and a French being in Italy. If the Italian would talk English neither the German nor the French would be offended by this, most likely appreciate it as English is wider spread. If the Italian would talk German to the French or French to the German, well, he would probably made an enemy through a wrong assumption by misjudging the whereabouts.
            One thing I find particularly funny is when people from different countries meet each other and say “Where are you from? Hold on, let me guess…” They don’t even realize that rather than it being funny to most people it can be pretty insulting. Ever guessed a Greek being Turkish or vice versa?

            I understand your point though red scarf.

          • red scarf

            Yes, I find the country guessing game funny so, especially when they also start saying oh you look like David Beckham, WTF!, although I was quite honoured to be mistaken for Billy Corgan.

            I guess the assumptions of it are that in a way why some people find “老外” as a negative word simply because they feel it strips them of their national, cultural and moral identity away while at the same time conferring that they can’t be like or as good as the Chinese identity.

          • ShuangXi

            It’s also not so much that people are stripping me of my cultural identity as it is they are lumping me and EVERYONE else together.

            I remember I was with some lesser educated people I knew and a story came up about something some asshole middle eastern guy did to someone they knew (I’m not saying middle eastern guys are assholes, just this one).

            Then they start talking about how all laowai are this and that and looking at me. That was both awkward and extremely irritating. Safe to say that was one of the last times I hung out with them.

          • ane92

            Sadly you can see cases of this in any country. Make no mistake that in western countries (America for example) there are uneducated people who would group all Chinese people into a category and say “chinese people are this and that”….or the same with blacks or mexicans ect ect.

            There’s always gonna be people like this. Sometimes it’s due to racism, a lot of times though it’s simply due to lack of education and lack of proper exposure to a different culture.

          • snicker

            I keep getting mistaken for Da Shan… D’oh…

          • snicker

            I think you should have replied in Japanese.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Same experience regarding the tea scammers.

            Was in Shanghai about 6 years ago on my first visit to China fresh out of Japan. I got so tired of people walking up to me and asking in broken English if I wanted to go have tea, so I started responding in Japanese, which of course confused the hell out of most people.

            A couple of them though responded in Japanese and just persisted in following me down the street even harder.

          • ane92

            Look at it this way….if you were working at a Chinese owned restaurant in a western country , yes you may be required to speak Chinese to the Chinese(looking) people that come in. It’s a way for a foreign country to make foreigners feel more welcome.

            It’s certainly not meant to be rude. Also like someone else said, English is the main world language so it’s pretty understandable people would speak to a foreigner in English even if that foreigner is say Russian and can’t speak English.

          • donscarletti

            He has a good question. Language choice and what you say with it are completely different, if he was to address his local customers “欢迎光临星巴克,您要喝什么?” and you with “Welcome to Starbucks, what would you like to drink?” that is the same.

            The speaking English thing has three reasons:
            Firstly, greet a Chinese tourist in Chinese and I guarantee you will sell more, whether they speak English fluently or not. Greet a foreign tourist in English and it will usually be the same. You were probably in an area where tourists outnumber expats.
            Secondly, your Chinese might be shit and hard for him to understand, switching to English is a good way to speed up the process if his English is good. I have had an idiot in McDonalds who _can’t_ speak English insist on it (see point 3), but normally they won’t push it if they’re not competent.
            Thirdly, he might want to practice his English. Using a skill during work is a good way to turn a shitty job into a learning experience.

            Anyway, stop being so sensitive.

          • ane92

            Very well said about selling more/getting more customers when you speak English. In areas in China where it’s mainly business people or tourists if their choices are going to a shop where they don’t understand the person or going to a shop where they understand the person, they will typically keep going back to the place where they can accutally talk with the person.

            As for starbucks….it’s an American owned company that is frequented heavily by foreign tourists/businessmen on their brief stay in China. It would be very foolish for starbucks to not encourage/demand their employees speak English since that’s a very large % of their customer base.

          • fabulous

            Young man studied English from kindergarten songs to University courses.
            He graduated along with the other million English language diploma holders and couldn’t find a job.
            He convinces the manager at Starbucks that his English skills will be an asset to the workplace.
            He gets the job.
            He’s so happy.
            First day on the job, he wants to impress the boss.
            Obvious foreigner walks in.
            This foreigner looks like he place his fare share of Warhammer; he’s probably British. 75% probability.
            He summons up all of his cheery English skill.
            Smile on his face.
            Manager right behind him.
            He says “Welcome to Starbucks! Are you having a nice day?”

            “為什麼你對我跟對其他的人不一樣?”

            His heart breaks.
            His manager intervenes, “Sorry sir, he’s new.” (He says it in Mandarin, but writing in characters and then translating is pathetic.)
            Young man is put on cup scrubber duty for the afternoon.
            Plans how he will poison this guys coffee next time.

          • ane92

            hahaha seriously. dude’s trying to be polite and do his job well and some jerk just totally gave him a hard time for no apparent reason. geez :(

          • dave

            Brilliant.

          • ane92

            I’m not sure I understand your complaint here.

            You complain because one person can’t speak English so they show you the price to try to make it easier for you (assuming that maybe you don’t understand what they would say if they say it in Chinese since this is the case with most foreign customers).

            Then you complain in another instance where a person is kind enough to speak to you in your native language ….at an American brand business nonetheless.

            Seems like your being petty and complaining over nothing. The reality is most foreigners who come to China don’t speak Chinese. In these two situations people aren’t trying to be rude or treat you “different”. They are simply trying to communicate with you more easily.

            Also keep in mind these are strangers, and the majority of foreigners they deal with don’t speak Chinese. They don’t know you, you can’t expect them to know that you speak Chinese and that somehow you find it rude if they don’t speak to you in Chinese.

            With all that said, there certainly are cases where people are treated different or someone may be rude to you. But Chinese people do the same thing to other Chinese people, that’s simply a case of someone having a bad attitude or being rude and that’s gonna occur anywhere in the world.

          • It is a little silly when you ask something simple like “多少钱?” and they still tell you with a calculator or face the register screen towards you as if you’re only smart enough to ask what something costs but incapable of knowing numbers. Or the small market by my house where they did this for half a year and now they just tell me the price and everybody in the store marvels that I can actually understand numbers and acts amazed, like I just grew an arm out of my ass.

          • snicker

            I had the recent amusing experience that a group of me and my foreign buddies were at a bar – one of them is Chinese American…the server kept bringing him the bill…ha…I should bring him out drinking more often…

          • Cynic

            for a purportedly superior people they are awfully shy.

          • Nick in Beijing

            I had a friend of mine visiting from the states two winters ago. She’s Vietnamese American, not even all that Chinese looking (being half white, and half SE Asian, you get the idea). Every time we went out together same thing happened. First I’d speak in Chinese (because she couldn’t speak a word of it), and the server would go “huh?” then start spouting off at my friend, because she looks kind of Asian, so she must be Chinese!

            My friend would just freak out and turn to me and say things like ‘what is she saying to me?! What do I do?!”.

            Annoying as hell, but funny as shit.

          • Fraser Stewart

            Oh yeah. When I studied in Shanghai I had a Japanese friend who is half Chinese half Japanese, and a Chinese Indonesian friend. Whenever we went out together, exactly the same thing. The interesting thing was, both spoke Chinese fluently (better than me), so people would be convinced that they were Chinese! (I.e. born in China).

            What was even funnier was, my Indonesian friend would ask me to talk to the staff. The reason, when they replied to me they would speak much more slowly. When they replied to him, they would speak at their normal speed because they believed he was a Chinese guy.

          • El Puma R.

            I’ve already crossed the edge on this matter. I thought this could only happen in northeast China.

          • Sergio De Gregorio

            You should really watch the movie called Shanghai Calling!

          • donscarletti

            I’ve seen them do that when I am with a Vietnamese guy, a Korean girl, a Malaysian Chinese (English/Cantonese speaker) and an ABC (English and some Cantonese). It’s particularly funny the time they actually had me translate some questions _about_ Korea back and forth with that girl, then one of those same people went right back to addressing her in Chinese 3 minutes later.

          • en

            Yeah good point. Pisses me off when I’m talking in Chinese and they get so distracted by my white face they forget to listen to the words coming out of my mouth.

          • fabulous

            Maybe they are pissed off at your face.

      • donscarletti

        Being called 老外, 死老外, 死洋鬼子, etc is the small price to pay to live in a country where you won’t be sued for creating a “hostile workplace” for a bit of sailor talk around the office. I would call the lack of PC sensitivity is one of the major attractions of China.

      • huotudou

        I’m gonna disagree with your thinking that laowai is suppose to be offensive. If you really understand the culture, you will realize that laowai is a shorter version of waiguoren(to us ‘waigoren’ sounds a bit distant). It in some way is a fond way of what we call people from overseas. Chinese people tend to give each other prefix-names such as ‘lao’ ‘xiao’ of ‘pang’ or even ‘fei’ and they may sound derogatory but if you can distinguish between the tones they are often a fond way of calling each other, to show the closeness of the bond. If you really want to know what an offensive way of calling a foreigner is, then it’s ‘yangguizi’ (and even then it depends of the tone because chinese people like to joke, they give each other weird names that, if you listen closely, actually shows their playful attitudes and fondness of each other).
        And we don’t really say ‘hanwen’ we say ‘zhongwen’ meaning language of the middle kingdom or ‘yuwen’. And even if we use ‘hanwen’ there really is no racist undertones, because ‘hanwen’ is the language of the han people just like ‘manwen’ is the language of the manchurians and “fawen’ is the language of the french. Basically in chinese language you add ‘wen’ behind a country/race it means that country/race’s language. China prides itself in the different ethnic groups with ‘han’ being one of them, these different ethnic groups will have their own languages so I don’t see a problem with using ‘hanwen’ when other ethnic groups use their own ‘-wen’.
        China isn’t quite as used to foreigners as taiwan so that’s why non-chinese looking faces are often considered a rare site so some people tend to stare (it’s like ‘ah, a foreigner is visiting our country.’). And let’s face it, there are not many people that are actually staying in china on the long term, most people are only there for holidays or a short period of time so chinese people tend to view foreigners as outsiders (because they don’t know much people that are actually here for long, and the ones that do stay long often keep to themselves, because they have more of an emphasis on ‘privacy’). When chinese people become more used to long-term non-chinese residents, they will be less and less likely to consider non-chinese looking people as foreigners.
        Besides, chinese people tend to have the mentality that you should love your motherland, so you are always from where you come from but that doesn’t mean we don’t treat you as nicely as we treat ourselves. If fact most chinese people have the mentality to treat foreigners as ‘guests’ , so they probably treat you even nicer than they would treat a fellow chinese. And there is also the mentality that guest is family, but that’ll take another explanation.
        This being said there are racist bigots in every race, not excluding the chinese race. But I should think that most chinese people enjoy different cultures coming to china and enjoy making friends with them. It’s just a pity that you couldn’t pick up on some of the chinese mentality and differentiate between what is fond remarks and actual insults.

        • ZhangJian88

          “Lao wai” is offensive and NOT a term of endearment. If your line of reasoning is “Chinese people tend to give each other prefix-names such as ‘lao’ ‘xiao’
          of ‘pang’ or even ‘fei’ and they may sound derogatory but if you can
          distinguish between the tones they are often a fond way of calling each
          other, to show the closeness of the bond,” has nothing to with “lao wai.”

          You seem to have an interest in China and the language and with time you will learn that “lao wai” is not used between as a term of address between a foreigner and a Chinese.

          • elizabeth

            I have called many Chinese with those prefixes and I do not mind being called a laowai. Like some others have pointed out, I don’t see why it is so offensive to be called a laowai.

            Perhaps it has more to do with the relations between the laowai in question and the Chines who addresses him as such than the term itself in which case maybe it is good to for him to reflect on why the Chinese use that ‘tone’ on him.

            Maybe it is to return the insults that some obnoxious foreigners pile on them or maybe it is just what Bunny Hiccups has pointed out – some laowai do not like the PC environment back home and they like it here, provided they get the PC treatment but do not have to treat the Chinese likewise.

            I gave someone the non-PC treatment hours ago, I used “arrogant, obnoxious prick” and I wasn’t surprised at all that he was insulted even though he was given to insulting the Chinese using non-PC terms. It’s double standards. But should it be? I would also not be surprised if the same person is one of those who insisted on free speech and no moderation on this site.

            No doubt, laowai can be offensive. Any neutral words can be offensive when used in a certain way and tone. But it is not the word but the context and that is linked to interpersonal relations and/or perceptions. To take offense at every instance it is used may be symptomatic of an intolerant and unreasonable person who, in some cases, applies double standards…in the worst case scenario…in other people’s country. That sounds like an international bully to me.

          • In your last paragraph, you imply that ‘laowai’ is a neutral word that can be offensive or not. Could you expand on this, I’m not sure what you mean. Thanks.

          • elizabeth

            Laowai does not have to refer to a group of people. Even if it does, it is not necessarily offensive. Examples of uses which I do not think are offensive are:

            My neighbour is a ‘laowai’ (foreigner).
            I have many friends/colleagues who are ‘laowai’ (foreigner).

            Why is it offensive? What is racist about it? In fact, I can’t think of any instance I have encountered where ‘laowai’ is offensive or racist to me.

            Maybe if used with an adjective/curse word like ‘chou laowai’, ‘si laowai’, it is offensive but only because of the curse word and tone, not ‘laowai’ itself. So, no, it is not racist to me.

            Could you provide examples where it is offensive or racist apart from that Guardian does not use the word ‘foreigner’?

            Is Guardian the ultimate authority on what’s offensive or not?

          • Sorry, I still don’t get what you mean by a ‘neutral word’. Do you mean, for example, that the English word ‘foreigner’ has no latent meaning in culture, history and society and it is equal to the word ‘chair’ when heard by people? if I see someone non-white looking in the UK and shout, “hey, foreigner,” it won’t have any kind of meaning except an act of neutral getting of attention?

            Never mind the Guardian or my opinions, I could be wrong. I’m asking for you to further explain what YOU wrote because I don’t get it. I just want to understand your point of view. Seriously. Do you think all words are neutral? Can the infamous “N-word” be said and heard with no associations save that unheard in the thought process of the speaker?

            Go on …

          • elizabeth

            I have been very clear and do not see the need to explain myself any further except to say, yes, ‘hey foreigner’ is not offensive to me. I am not an overly sensitive kind of person and we are talking about China, not UK.

          • Clear? I asked you what you meant by ‘neutral word’ and you have said “‘hey foreigner’ is not offensive to me” … never mind further, you haven’t explained yourself at all. That is your prerogative, of course. Other readers besides you and I can read both our comments and make their own minds up. Anyway, thanks for replying at all, nice of you to take the time. I mean that.

          • ShuangXi

            Elizabeth,

            I am like you, in that I don’t take offense to the word ‘laowai’ (unless it’s obvious), and that most of the time we hear it, it carries no intentional derogatory meaning, but I think you are missing the point.

            If we were in, say the US (assuming you are American… could be anywhere), and you have a foreign friend, and you introduce him to your other friends “This is my foreigner friend, Shuangxi,” that’s no big deal and normal. But if other people start calling Shuangxi ‘foreigner’ (“Hey foreigner, what did you want on that pizza again?”) it’s a little bit rude, and in some cases, very difficult or impossible to distinguish if it is meant as an insult or not.

            It’s not the best example, since English commonly uses only the word ‘foreigner’, but Chinese uses ‘waiguoren’, ‘laowai’, ‘yangren’ all pretty commonly. However ‘waiguoren’ is pretty non-equivocally matter-of-fact, while ‘laowai’ is a bit more ambiguous. Even better would be to not use anything (‘Hey, what do want on that pizza again?’) but I realize that still has a long time coming.

            Another example (though still not perfect) is the N word. We all know it’s a very bad word (main difference from ‘laowai’), but also in some groups its socially acceptable for black people, and maybe a white person, to use this word. However that leads to other people using it with the excuse ‘What? That’s what they call themselves. I’m not using it in a bad way.’

            I’m not fighting against the word, I just don’t like it whenever foreigners refer to themselves or others this way, as it reinforces some negative side-consequences.

          • kodiavila

            Its not the name Laowai that is a bother. Its always being differentiated from everyone else. Most Americans and foreigners will not say, “My Chinese friend wants to get a tattoo, my Spanish friend…….My black friend……etc.. They are simply friends regardless of race or nationality unless the conversation these friends are mentioned within explicitely require sepcification as to what race or nationality they are. For example I have many friends from different places and of all races, but the3re is no need to separate them by race or nationality.

          • kodiavila

            Furhermore, racism is not culture and if it is then the culture needs to improve, much like culture in many other Western and Asian countries has in order to be tolerant toward race, gender, and nationality. Just because a person is Muslim does not mean he/she is a terrorist, simply because a person is black does not mean he/she is a drug dealer, simply because a person is white does not mean he/she is “open” or “rich” and just because a person is Chinese does not mean he/she is easy, shallow, or a lying peice of corrupt shit….. right?

        • Any slang term referring to a group of diverse people as ‘foreigners’ is negative. In the UK, right wing leaning newspapers and trashy tabloids will throw the word foreign and foreigners around all the time but a paper like the Guardian will use ‘international’ or ‘world news’ and use people’s names (wow) or official nationalities. Not only is racism in every country but also a lack of understanding of what racism is. The Shaoguan Incident and resulting unrest in Wulumuqi and then Xinjiang were possibly the largest modern race riots and related disturbances that have happened since I was born.

          Back in the UK, the current ongoing controversy over John Terry has exposed a whole range of ignorance and inconsistency on the issue. Also, many newspapers and politicians continue to publicly bait and blame ‘immigrants.’ In fact, we have political parties and movements who seem to be practically based on racism.

          What you say about people having the mentality to treat ‘foreigners’ differently by default and love your motherland above all – that’s racism. Everyone should be judged only on their actions as an individual – and with reasonable expectations, not perfection. That’s a global standard.

        • Err Laowai is kinda offensive by definition. The characters basically mean ‘Old Outsider’… and what did the old foreigners do to China? Almost every foreign country has screwed with China at some point in their history, so referring to us as ‘Old foreigners’ is offensive.

          I don’t sell opium or rape Nanjing.

      • Jixiang

        In Taiwan you would be considered Taiwanese if you acquired the nationality? I don’t believe that one bit. How long have you actually lived in Taiwan. Perhaps you’ve just been there six months, and are still in the homenymoon phase?
        Furthermore, I don’t see why the word 汉语 is racist. Yes, it was originally the language of the Han, just like Tibetan is the language of the Tibetans etc…. What’s the problem with calling it that?

      • Seppo

        If you went to northern Ireland and saw what occupation means, would you encourage aggro?

      • kodiavila

        Having to note the racial or difference in nationality when referring to another individual is a rather annoying habit, however we need to give them time to integrate into the world system. At this pace perhaps most Chinese will have an international world view by the year 3030.

  • Harland

    Ugh. Bad. Not funny, and the sound is terrible.

    Just plays into the foreigner stereotype that Beijing is the only place in China that exists.

  • kaka

    I long ago became immune to the self-indulgent expressions of mediocrity proudly displayed, one presumes in the hope of gaining some appreciation of their meaningless lives, by talentless rejects that pass for the foreign student population of Beijing – most of whom are there because they couldn’t find a decent educational establishment to accept them on a meaningful course back in their home country…. so as a “fattist” the only emotion or thought I took from the experience of watching the inane video was bemusement as to why someone who has more than a passing resemblance to Sea World’s Shamu would wear a mask to hide their face, whilst at the same time wearing a neon pink t-shirt?

  • Getrealson

    OFF TOPIC – Any of the boys in china – What vpn do you use to get around the great firewall for youtube etc? Ninjacloak not working.

    • David Pitts

      I use “Securitales”

      • Getrealson

        thanks mate

        • Terrik

          I use PandaPow. It’s been working great.

    • Cynic

      i use 12vpn. its the cheapest. requires periodic updates (meaning you have to download the packages and resintal). not the most reliable or fast but it works and its cheap.

  • Alexander

    So the nerdiest foreigners in China decided to make a music video, nice. They are all so young though, probably in China as university students and this is what they do with their time, really? That’s why the concept of a full-time university student is a sham in the west….. Full-time student = lazy ass who doesn’t want to work

    • Kate

      And commenting on csmack is a better use of time?

    • Terrik

      Have you ever been a university student in China? Even Chinese tend to view university as freedom and fun time.

    • blahblahblah

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  • BadgerinDongBeiChiner

    I like this obviously comical amateur parody of a sheyet rehash. I’m very happy to see young Americans come to China to learn both culture and language.
    As a trainer of Chinese employees working in multi-national corporations for many years here in China, I see the arrogance leaving Americans and joining Chinese as China grows and grows. Being number one is going to hurt Chinese as it hurt the US, as we see Chinese FP change to become more like American FP, the arrogance of ordinary Chinese people will unfortunately grow to replicate the stupidity of ordinary Americans. Unfortunately the few Americans who do cross the Ocean and learn can’t make much of difference in the long run. I can’t believe I hear arrogant words like ‘this is China we should do things in a Chinese way’, from an idiotic and very lucky employee of a globally successful manufacturing company, just complaining because he has to follow stringent QC processes to make sure a Toyota style meltdown doesn’t happen just because some arrogant fool thinks the old Chinese way is better. Grow up China, you want to end up as hated as Americans, lose the arrogance, you were much nicer years ago when you needed the help of the west when developing !!!

  • elizabeth

    Maybe the reason why some ‘laowai’s in China take offense at being called ‘laowai’ is because they think they are a superior race and therefore would be welcomed with open arms anywhere. But when, in reality, they find themselves alienated, they take it as an insult.

    It’s like, “Hey, I am here to help you out of your pitiful circumstances with my way way superior skills (and arrogantly obnoxious attitude). My boss can’t do without me with my truckloads of industry contacts. I can even speak your language better than you do. How then could you lowly creatures call me an outsider? You should be dying to accept me as one of you because my presence elevates your status. I should be treated like a king because you need me. Without me, you are nothing.”

    Fortunately, we have people like Jesse and Dashan and other foreigners who are knowledgeable about China yet humble enough to reach out without being condescending.

    People like them are effective in building bridges. No wonder they are well received.

    • Ruffled Feathers

      No they are well received because they act like the circus monkeys you think all ‘foreigners’ should be. Most ‘laowai’ are not arrogant over China’s ways, they just see it for what it is, a backward country where ignorance and prejudice are seen as virtues. All most non-Chinese who live in China want is to be accepted and treated the same ways as the Chinese treat each other. However, China is too backward and prejudiced to ever do that.

      • elizabeth

        How could you naturally accept someone who constantly derides your country as backward, even if it is true, in your face? Would you accept me as your friend if I constantly deride you, even if it is true?

        Would you doubt my sincerity if I said you were arrogant, egoistic, know-it-all and at the same time expect you to accept me into your circle of friends?

        As for circus monkeys, one man’s meat is another man’s poison. You see infantile monkeys, others may appreciate childlike humor.

        • Ruffled Feathers

          Let’s deal with this little by little:

          1 “How could you naturally accept someone who constantly derides your country as backward…”

          Well, change it, so it’s not backward, then we’ll stop complaining. I thought China was a ‘developing’ country. How about you develop your social and racial attitudes too.

          2 “Would you doubt my sincerity if I said you were arrogant, egoistic,
          know-it-all and at the same time expect you to accept me into your
          circle of friends?”

          I don’t know why you said this, you’re the one bringing up arrogance again and again. All I said is that foreigners are not arrogant most of the time.

          3 “one man’s meat is another man’s poison. You see infantile monkeys, others may appreciate childlike humor”.

          This basically confirms what I just said, you think foreigners exist purely for your entertainment, and that you won’t take us seriously as people. Now, I know NOT ALL Chinese think this way, but the vast majority do, and certainly you do.

          My advice to you is grow up and realize you’re not the center of the universe. You said ‘laowai’ think they’re the more superior race, when in fact it’s you Chinese who consider yourselves superior. Proof of this, for one, is that all Western nations are multicultural and inclusive; China not only isn’t but shuns this idea of all people born equal, in favor of Chinese racial and cultural supremacy, and generally looking down on other nations/races/cultures.

          Let’s face it, Chinese are by and large simply racist towards peoples of other countries. This is your culture.

          • elizabeth

            1 Well, why don’t you stop complaining instead of expecting the Chinese to make the first move. It is you who are unhappy about the so called backward China, a country that does not belong to you. Your attitude fully illustrates the kind of arrogance I was referring to – go to someone’s country and demand that do as you say because you think you are the most advanced and civilized person.

            2 I turned the tables so you can see how it’s like to demand that you do as I expect you to. Obviously you are trying to evade the issue. Would you accept me as one of you if I were Chinese? Would you, you arrogant stubborn prick? You will remain an obnoxious, ignorant outsider until you are willing to accept the Chinese as they are instead of shoving your over the top snide remarks into their throats like you are entitled to lord over them.

            3 Basically, whoever does not have the same taste as you do is Chinese. In fact, whenever you and the likes of you have run out of rebuttals, you will assume I am Chinese.

            And why am I not surprised you have assumed I am Chinese? Just like some of your racist predecessors? So let me get this straight – foreigners who come to China and demand that the Chinese do as they say are the ones who are bullied. That’s as ridiculous as barging into someone’s home and demanding to be treated like family after spewing the most unsavory remarks about their habits and refusing to leave even when they are unhappy and urged to get lost…because they have responsibilities. Yeah, big shots taking care of the uncivlized people they deride. If that isn’t arrogance, I do not know what is.

            My advice for you is to go back to school and learn how to hold a debate instead of using straw man ‘arguments’ and red-herrings. And right, the one who needs to grow up is you.

          • Ruffled Feathers

            Fine, I assumed you were Chinese, my bad. So, ok, so what’s the basis of your vehement dislike of foreign attitudes in China if you’re not Chinese? Is it that you’re a sniveling liberal, similar to the likes of Bunny Hiccups and JankyFosci who are ashamed of the Western ways of thinking, and just defend China in the hope of rubbing shoulders with the Commies?

            I also love the way you get so angry because I disagree with you. Why do you take it so personally? Ooh I’m an “arrogant stubborn prick” because I disagreed with you. Jeez, calm down. I never threw any personal insults at you.

            You also contradicted yourself. First you said: why should we wait for the Chinese to make the first move?, and then you say it’s their country, we have no right to tell them how it is. Well, which? By the way, the “first move” the Chinese often like to make is usually some kind of attack or mockery against foreigners when they first lay eyes on us.

            Moreover, China is largely backward. Labeling everyone different to them
            as ‘foreigner’, defecating on the street, falling asleep at work,
            driving the wrong way up the road, and generally not taking
            responsibility for their actions is backward thinking, and symbolizes
            this is an ignorant society. Do you really disagree that this should be changed?

            Now, most us us on China smack who vent our frustrations about this place are not looking to change china or claim overlordship or any other ‘imperialist’ things you think we want, we just want to be treated as equals.

            “Yeah, big shots taking care of the uncivilized people they deride”

            Personally, I’ve never mat any foreigners who think like this, so I guess it’s just a fantasy of yours. Just because we complain about this place does not mean we want to control it, we just think it should be brought up to better standards. Isn’t that what development is all about? Everyone is entitled to their opinion, so stop getting so nasty about everything.

            Hey, more advice, why don’t you put down The Communist Manifesto and the Little Red Book and actually think for yourself, instead of spewing this Marxist bullshit at me.

          • elizabeth

            Would you accept me as one of you if I were a Chinese?

          • Ruffled Feathers

            Yes, of course, why not? We are all human beings aren’t we?

          • elizabeth

            Really? As one with all those unhygienic habits, one who does things differently, one who is everything you complain about? One who holds dear ‘The Communist Manifesto’ and spews ‘Marxist bullshit’?

            I smell dishonesty.

          • Ruffled Feathers

            Why do you see things in such absolutes, like pure black and white? Just because I and many others complain about China sometimes does not mean we absolutely hate it here and I certainly don’t hate Chinese people. It’s just sometimes they do things that piss us off, particularly in their regard to their attitude towards us. My point is that I wish things were better and more equal for us here. If that translates into hatred and Western imperialist arrogance, in your eyes, then I think you have serious issues.

          • elizabeth

            My point is very simple. If you wish to be accepted as one of them, accept them first, and that means ‘accept them as they are’. If you can’t, fair enough, but you should not expect them to accept you. If you want acceptance, you have to earn it, not demand it. That’s all I am saying.

          • Ruffled Feathers

            The thing is, most foreigners don’t go shooting their mouths off at Chinese. Normally the Chinese make the first attack with their “hello, laowai laowai” bullshit. It’s largely this sort of behavior: the ridicule, that I am referring to. Although I don’t like the shitting on the street, driving thew wrong way, etc. I can live with it because it’s not a direct attack on me. However, although respect and acceptance should be earned (as you rightly said) everyone is entitled to a rudimentary level of respect, like respect to one’s privacy or respect to their dignity. Chinese often don’t care about this, especially with regard to a foreigner.

          • elizabeth

            I can identify with that, but most of the time, I simply walk away. Or, if I have to deal with them, like service staff, I smile, say xie xie, bu hao yi, etc. They are usually taken by surprise. At best, they become friendlier. At worst, they remain benign.

            If someone is bent on picking bones with me, there is nothing I can do. Don’t sweat the small stuff, I tell myself, unless it is absolutely necessary to retaliate.

            In any case, it is nice to be accepted, but if not, I do lose sleep over it.

          • elizabeth

            …don’t lose sleep…

          • Cynic

            Chinese don’t even accept themselves. They certainly could never accept a foreigner.

          • elizabeth

            And yes, I’d like to apologize for deliberately using ‘prick’ on you to put my point across. I felt very uncomfortable using such language.

        • El Puma R.

          Let’s put it this way. I’ve a group of chinese friends and they are great friends indeed. I often need their help with my chinese studies but even though some of them know more than others, no one will answer my questions unless the “big brother” (or the oldest, or more respected member of the group) responds or approves their answers, funny thing is all this happens regardless of how ignorant the big brother could be. I even have to shout they can speak even though “the elder” doesn’t know anything about it… so yeah, Chinese rather look ignorant as long as they keep respect for whoever is above them at any stupid level they might find important, or as long as they don’t get singled out.. even though if it would be about doing what they should do or think is right. They even find me quite defying whenever I challenge “the big brother” (my best chinese friend ) ‘s intelligence or knowledge… nothing strange for a western friend. What a bunch of pussies… no worries, I’ve told them already.

  • alien

    wow and all these years I thought laowai in China is pretty fucking stupid and lame.
    This solidifies the fact that I hate them. Why? Because I am a laowai and who cares if their chinese is good or not.

    the point i am trying to make is:

    1. they really look foolish
    2. they couldn’t sing even if it means to save their lives.
    3. They could have chosen a much better base, music wise
    4. They really embarrassed themselves.
    5. No face in my mind

    yes, i have lived in china for 10 years and each and every laowai i speak to have too much of the same mindset and feelings and discussions about China. They turn my stomach greatly.

    99% of my friends are 中国人.

    god, if you are real, and listening, please slap these people for making themselves
    look so damn stupid and hopefully your wisdom will be soaked in their minds.

    or perhaps there is no god, in which case I humbly ask someone to make another video with some style

    Diaoyu dao is China’s!!!

    • Getrealson

      Hate Laowai, worried about face, 99% chinese friends, Senkaku is China’s! and
      proven you’re dumb, you are Chinese! dickhead! Go pick some lice off your 中国人 freinds!

  • Dutchman

    well done guys ,despite the fact that there are still a few people who cant humor in this clip and comment STILL in bad English…keep going nice job !!

  • MrT

    Testing 1 2 3..

  • Bunny Hiccups

    Wanna see my impression of a laowai? “Hey, i’m a laowai, i hate being pc! China is so much better bec i don’t have to worry about being sensitive to the feelings of others…. hey? why’d you call me a laowai! why you treat me like an outsider? waaaaaaah! that’s not fair! waaaaah! i live here too! waaaaaaah! Don’t call me names, that’s so un-pc!”

    • Nilerafter24

      You’re hard-pressed to accept some facts about China.
      When you stay here a while, you start to notice things are not what they seem. Words you thought were harmless take on different meanings. Smiles you thought were friendly turn sinister. Seemingly benign strangers, sitting nonchalantly across you in the subway, will discuss about you in a most disrespectful way, mistakenly believing that you cannot understand their language.
      Of course this is a brash generalization since not all people here are like that but for the sake of clarity,it’ll will have to suffice.
      My point is, you still believe that we bitch and moan on unfounded prejudices. Sometimes that’s true. Most times it’s not.
      And before you retort, I’m black African. And if you were here, you may not even have the comfort of being called ‘laowai’ all the time. You’d get a lot of ‘黑鬼’ or ‘your teeth are so white’ thrown in your face.

      ‘Laowai’ in my own personal experience, more often than not carries negative undertones when used by Chinese people.

  • Bunny Hiccups

    these laowai in these pictures are disturbing. why is it that, every picture of a whitey laowai , he has a very weird face and dresses unfashionably? Did you guys get kicked out of your native countries for being gangly and oafish? Just the ugliest dudes. i can see why asians ridicule you. most of you are old, bald fat, and short, like the russian laowai. strangely, most russians are tall and muscular. or the young laowai have ugly facial symmetry. the guy singing looks completely retarded. others have weird face structures, like cavemen. it’s like all the ugly people were deported out of western countries to china as a conspiracy to breed with the chinese making them even uglier. good luck china, looks like you got the worst of the crop. you have a massively obese girl in china… wonder how life is for her. notice how none of the chinese dancing in the video will show their face. who would, standing next to a singing guy who looks like he has down syndrome. at least the real gangnam style is cool. to the guy in the video, forgive me for being mean, he is having fun and that’s what matters. hope he’s not a massive douche like his expat friends, which is why i zing’ed him too. he probably is.

  • Ben A.

    My brother’s response to this, in his own words, in a CRI English interview.
    The quicktime plugin they used was a bit buggy on my mac, as a warning – the actual video didn’t show up until after my brother had emailed them about the bug, so I’m not sure if the video will work for everybody…nonetheless:
    http://english.cri.cn/7146/2012/10/19/164s728023.htm

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