‘Friend of China’ Hugo Chávez Dies, Chinese Netizen Reactions

2006 August 27, Taishan, Shandong Province, China: Venezuelan President Chávez says a prayer.

Major Chinese web portal NetEase posted an article about Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez’s recent passing, as well as several photo features commemorating him as a “friend to the Chinese people”…

From NetEase

China’s Old Friend Hugo Chavez

Venezuelan Vice-President Nicolas Maduro announced on March 5th that President Hugo Chavez passed away at 4:25pm local time on the 5th, at the age of 58. Before his death, Chavez had visited China multiple times, actively promoting China-Venezuela economic trade. He liked reading Sun Tzu’s The Art of War and held Mao Zedong Thought in esteem, and was regarded as an old friend of the Chinese people.

[Above] 2006 August 27, Taishan, Shandong Province, China: Venezuelan President Chávez says a prayer.

Chinese President Jiang Zemin (right) shakes hands with Venezuelan President Chávez.

2001 April 17, Carreño Cultural Complex: Chinese President Jiang Zemin (right) shakes hands with Venezuelan President Chávez.

2006 August 24, Great Hall of the People, Beijing: At a signing ceremony, Venezuelan President Chávez (left) gives a thumbs-up to Chinese President Hu Jintao.

2006 August 24, Great Hall of the People, Beijing: At a signing ceremony, Venezuelan President Chávez (left) gives a thumbs-up to Chinese President Hu Jintao.

2006 August 24, Great Hall of the People, Beijing: At a signing ceremony, Venezuelan President Chávez (left) and Chinese President Hu Jintao drink a toast.

2006 August 24, Great Hall of the People, Beijing: At a signing ceremony, Venezuelan President Chávez (left) and Chinese President Hu Jintao drink a toast.

2006 August 24, Great Hall of the People, Beijing: At a welcoming ceremony, Venezuelan President Chávez and Chinese President Hu Jintao (right) inspect the honor guard.

2006 August 24, Great Hall of the People, Beijing: At a welcoming ceremony, Venezuelan President Chávez and Chinese President Hu Jintao (right) inspect the honor guard.

2001 April 15, Simón Bolívar International Airport, Venezuela: Chinese President Jiang Zemin (left) attends a welcoming ceremony held by Venezuelan President Chávez.

2001 April 15, Simón Bolívar International Airport, Venezuela: Chinese President Jiang Zemin (left) attends a welcoming ceremony held by Venezuelan President Chávez.

2009 April 9, Beijing: Xi Jinping meets Venezuelan President Chávez at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse. Photo credit: Xinhua reporter Li Tao

2009 April 9, Beijing: Xi Jinping meets Venezuelan President Chávez at the Diaoyu Islands National Guesthouse. Photo credit: Xinhua reporter Li Tao

2009 April 9, Beijing: Xi Jinping meets Venezuelan President Chávez at the Diaoyu Islands National Guesthouse. Photo credit: Xinhua reporter Li Tao

2011 November 24, Caracas, Venezuela: Venezuelan President Chávez (left) displaying a copy of Mao Zedong’s [Little Red Book] while meeting Chinese National Development and Reform Committee Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiaoqiang.

2011 November 24, Caracas, Venezuela: Venezuelan President Chávez (left) displaying a copy of Mao Zedong’s [Little Red Book] while meeting Chinese National Development and Reform Committee Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiaoqiang.

2011 November 24, Caracas, Venezuela: Venezuelan President Chávez (left) reading Mao Zedong’s [Little Red Book] while meeting Chinese National Development and Reform Committee Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiaoqiang. Venezuela’s Energy Secretary stated, Chinese companies would soon enter into joint-ventures with another four Venezuelan petroleum companies.

2011 November 24, Caracas, Venezuela: Venezuelan President Chávez (left) reading Mao Zedong’s [Little Red Book] while meeting Chinese National Development and Reform Committee Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiaoqiang. Venezuela’s Energy Secretary stated, Chinese companies would soon enter into joint-ventures with another four Venezuelan petroleum companies.

2011 November 24, Caracas, Venezuela: Venezuelan President Chávez (center), Venezuelan Commerce Secretary (left) and Chinese National Development and Reform Committee Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiaoqiang (right) shake hands. Venezuela’s Energy Secretary stated, Chinese companies would soon enter into-joint ventures with another four Venezuelan petroleum companies.

2011 November 24, Caracas, Venezuela: Venezuelan President Chávez (center), Venezuelan Commerce Secretary (left) and Chinese National Development and Reform Committee Deputy Secretary Zhang Xiaoqiang (right) shake hands. Venezuela’s Energy Secretary stated, Chinese companies would soon enter into-joint ventures with another four Venezuelan petroleum companies.

1999 October 11, Badaling, Beijing: Venezuelan President Chávez walks along the Great Wall together with tourists.

1999 October 11, Badaling, Beijing: Venezuelan President Chávez walks along the Great Wall together with tourists.

2012 February 10, Caracas, Venezuela: at Mira Flores Palace, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez (left) speaking with a group of engineers training to operate the Miranda satellite.

2012 February 10, Caracas, Venezuela: at Mira Flores Palace, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez (left) speaking with a group of engineers training to operate the Miranda satellite.

2008 September 24, Beijing: During a high-level Chinese-Venezuelan committee meeting, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez holds his hand out in a gesture of greeting.

2008 September 24, Beijing: During a high-level Chinese-Venezuelan committee meeting, Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez holds his hand out in a gesture of greeting.

2010 September 21, Caracas, Venezuela: at Ahe state-run Bicentenario [Bicentennial] supermarket, a pregnant woman learns more about home appliances imported from China.

2010 September 21, Caracas, Venezuela: at Ahe state-run Bicentenario [Bicentennial] supermarket, a pregnant woman learns more about home appliances imported from China.

2011 December 14, Caracas, Venezuela: Imported motorcycles from China parked outside the Keeway factory. At that time, China approved trading for petroleum through “gear loans” in Venezuela.

2011 December 14, Caracas, Venezuela: Imported motorcycles from China parked outside the Keeway factory. At that time, China approved trading for petroleum through “gear loans” in Venezuela.

Comments on NetEase:

网易广东省梅州市网友 [拈花o笑]:

[Written backwards] Good that he died.

王二门下走狗 [网易美国网友]:(responding to above)

[Written backwards] When will Fatty No. 3 [Kim Jong Un] croak?

人在台湾跨省唔效 [网易广东省佛山市网友]:(responding to above)

[Written backwards] I’m guessing soon…

jhggghk [网易广东省广州市番禺区网友]:

Chávez didn’t eliminate the opposition party, didn’t ban freedom of public assembly, congregations, or demonstrations, and he didn’t do away with private property. He didn’t restrict speech, he was elected by means of democracy, one vote at a time, and under the socialism he implemented, the vast majority of petroleum income was evenly distributed among the citizens, allowing all citizens to enjoy the wealth of the state equally, May I ask how could the ordinary people not support a leader like this? America [the USA] dislikes Chávez, but why didn’t they dare move [against] him? Because Chávez’s rise occurred entirely through organization, debate, demonstration, and voting. It was entirely American-style and entirely in accordance with the national constitution. It’s was only his economics were socialist and his politics were anti-American! If this is also socialism, I support it also!

网易广东省网友 [火神仙]: (responding to above)

Chávez’s democracy was merely a false democracy.

网易江苏省南京市网友 [小儿止咳化痰糖浆]: (responding to above)

Ahmadinejad was also [raised to power] by election, a bit more democratic than TC and North Korea.

网易天津市网友: (responding to above)

The democracy advocated by American dogs is the democracy of government bigwigs, capitalists, and rich people, so it will never succeed! Hahaahaha

网易湖北省武汉市网友 [陵墓碑]: (responding to above)

Dare I ask upstairs [previous poster], if you were struck dead by a wealthy person, I mean, with eyewitnesses, how many years do you think he would get [in prison]?

网易重庆市网友 [billboeing]: (responding to above)

Three penalty drinks

网易山东省威海市网友 [jsyuan888] :

Nonsense, this stupid cunt is the friend of Chinese traitors and gangsters [referring to the Chinese government], without a single bit of connection [relevance] to Chinese people.

弗里德木 [网易北京市网友]: (responding to above)

What NetEase said was “China’s Friend”, not the Chinese people’s friend. You understand.

谈笑桃源 [网易江西省新余市网友]:

Chávez is gone, China’s old friends are getting fewer and fewer.

UfO20061676 [网易广西南宁市网友]:

Basically all dictators are old friends of “the Chinese people”

第一垃圾时代 [网易辽宁省抚顺市网友]:

I’ve been represented [spoken for] again, [saying] I’m good friends with Chávez, actually I really dislike him.

What do you think of Hugo Chavez?

Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • Old friends of China: the photo ops all prove it.

    Bonus points on having a little red diary that he makes people in his presence uncomfortable by reading aloud from it without being prompted.

    • the other guy

      That was a big mistake on the side of his advisers.

    • mattsm84

      He needed to do it so they would forget about all the communists he killed in the 70s.

  • The National Guesthouse is not named after the Diaoyu Islands, and does not contan the character 岛, which would mean “island.”

  • Where are the famed photos of the Chinese-Venezuelan Communist Rainbow Party?

    • the other guy

      ???

      • A Communist Rainbow Party is when Hu Jintao, Hugo Chavez, and their comrades put on different colors of lipstick and suck each other’s dicks, leaving a rainbow of colors.

        • mattsm84

          No, that’s a Rusty Venture.

          A Communist Rainbow party is a Cleveland Steamer where in the people involved role play as Castro and Brezhev. Castro must be the receiving partner as the act is apt to result in a pooh beard, while the active partner does something not unlike what Brezhev did during the Prague Spring (IE: takes a shit on an increasing unwilling, supine partner.) I can see how you’d be confused.

          Pictures may be taken, provided the principle parties are edited out and replaced with photos of Stalin.

  • wacky

    my deepest condolence

    • mattsm84

      Venezuela is better off without him. The man was much better than being an populist than he was at actually governing. But then again, lobbing criticisms at the US and staging photo ops are easy, preventing your country from sinking into shambles is hard. During the last 14 years crime in Venezuela has skyrocketed (the murder rate tripled.) Income per household tripled as well but yearly inflation rates have averaged out at 22% so this is at best a pyrrhic victory. Deficits grew at a rate which out paced GDP. Oil production dropped by over a million barrels per day, even as the country became more reliant on oil exports. The country suffered from food shortages (an OPEC country suffering from food shortages is all but unheard of). And over 6 million people emigrated. As a head of state, he was an albatross.

      But his supporters are right, he didn’t imprison his political enemies, although he wasn’t above barring them from office. I guess that’s better than nothing if you’re a Caudillo.

      • the other guy

        You know, I don’t necessarily disagree with you, but you failed to recognize the merits of his office. I mean, Venezuela is without a doubt better than it was 14 years ago: Literacy rate is at it’s peak, wealth distribution is the best in Latin America (0.39. GINI) and extreme poverty has decreased 70%

        This, of course doesn’t mean that Venezuela is better than it’s neighbors TODAY. The GDP remains # 5 in Latin America, but like you said the economy is somehow is in shambles. The oil dependency has increased and the corruption and incompetent management of the “Chavista movement” has severely damaged the country.

        Still you fail to recognize that Hugo Chavez’s is not the only one to blame for this. Venezuela’s economic decline started during the opposition-orchestrated general strike of 2002–2003, halting the oil production that dominoed instantly to all other sectors of the economy, discouraging foreign investment and resulting in one of the biggest Capital flight’s that Venezuela has ever known.

        In the aftermath of things it was but natural to take more strict measures that ended in nationalization of private capital and state regulated currency. Before 2002 the national oil company PDVSA remained in a state of quasi-autonomy, but the strike gave Chavez all the reasons to nationalize the company that had outsourced all its brain to Washington.

        Another thing; I would like to know where did you get the number of 6 million immigrants. When the “Migration and Remittances Factbook 2011″ published by the World Bank says CLEARLY that 521,500 Venezuelans were living outside the country, compared to 2,122,300 Colombians, 1,367,300 Brazilians, 1,090,800 Peruvians, and 956,800 Argentinians. On the other hand, 1,007,400 people immigrated to Venezuela, the second highest amount in South America after Argentina.”

        YES, that’s right. Immigration has increased despite the high murder rate, overall insecurity and slow economy. Chinese, Haitians, Arabs, Indians, Pakistanis, Colombians, Peruvians, Bolivians, Ecuadorians walk the the streets of all the mayor cities of the country.

        Anyways, I would not say that Chavez was an optimal leader, truth to be told he could have been a better one, he did have all in favor to transform Venezuela in to a model country. But lets not forget that he did not drop out of nowhere.Hugo Chavez was product of the social and historical juncture. He was one of the few presidents in Latin American History that came to power from the lowest levels of society, thus earning the love of halve of the country.

        Overall, Chavez was a necessity and it is because of him that poor people matter today. Electoral battles are won and lost in shanty towns and the country side. Not in Miami of wherever this fictional number of 6 million of immigrants supposedly live.

        • mattsm84

          “I would like to know where did you get the number of 6 million immigrants.”

          I’d misread a particular statistic. I concede the number I presented was inaccurate. However, I’d add here that as of last years elections the number of people attempting to leave the country rose from 60,000 to 180,000, according to Bloomberg. http://www.voxxi.com/venezuela-economy-chavez-emigration/ That’s hardly an endorsement.

          “Still you fail to recognize that Hugo Chavez’s is not the only one to blame for this. Venezuela’s economic decline started during the opposition-orchestrated general strike of 2002–2003, halting the oil production that dominoed instantly to all other sectors of the economy, discouraging foreign investment and resulting in one of the biggest Capital flight’s that Venezuela has ever known.”

          A fair point, no single person is responsible for an entire economy, but the lion’s share of the blame still rests on Chavez. At this point, that strike was a decade ago, and Chavez’s tendency to nationalize and seize assets has undoubtedly done more than any other single factor to discourage foreign investment.

          “Literacy rate is at it’s peak, wealth distribution is the best in Latin America (0.39. GINI) and extreme poverty has decreased 70%”

          While that’s certainly significant, an incredibly high rate of inflation has meant that PPP has remain virtually stagnant for the last 5 years. (http://www.tradingeconomics.com/venezuela/gdp-per-capita-ppp) This is largely because new wealth hasn’t been created and existing wealth is being devalued. In doing his level best to drive off foreign investment even as he increases the rate at which his nation borrows money, Chavez is responsible for that. It’s what makes his 21st century socialism look an awful lot like shared poverty.

          “Electoral battles are won and lost in shanty towns and the country side.”

          Winning electoral battles is a lot easier when you bar opposition candidates from running, bully the media into silence, and rewrite the election rules to benefit you and your party (http://fletcher.tufts.edu/_Fletcher-Forum/Archives/~/media/Fletcher/Microsites/Fletcher%20Forum/PDFs/2011winter/Tarre.pdf).

          Don’t kid yourself, the only person in the country that mattered to Chavez was Chavez, and he certainly wasn’t above setting one half of the country against the other to do it. They’d have been better off without him.

          • the other guy

            Like I said, I don’t necessarily disagree with you. But still the opposition has plenty of blame for the economy.

            And about the shutting down the media. Chavez did not shut down any TV channel or radio station, their incenses expired and the government chose not to renew them. I know it sound the same, but it is not, there is a subtle difference to it, one is democratic and the other is not.

            Besides it was tho very same TV stations and radios that where “shutdown” that partook and even orchestrated the 2002 Coup d’état. I don’t know about you… But I think that if in any other country the media turned on the government inducing a bloody upraise against a democratic elected president, that they wouldn’t have walked unreprehended.

            This of course does not excuse any of the above mentioned erros and mistakes. But lets remember that it was that very incompetent political opposition shaped Chavez all along the way. They gave him a the keys to the country, the oil and if that was not enough they also gave him the Senate when the opposition walked away in sing of protest.

            Before 1998 the poor did not matter and two very similar parties alternated power leaving no space for other political views. After Chavez they are key actors in the modern political narrative. Maduro knows it as well as Capriles and that all by itself is important.

            There can not be a government only for the poor, just as there can not be a government only for the wealthy.

            Say what you, but Chavez happened for a reason. Was he a bad manager? Sure… Did he become megalomaniac years went by? You bet he did… But he certainly was not the tyrant that the Mainstream media makes him to be.

          • mattsm84

            “But still the opposition has plenty of blame for the economy.”

            They contributed, if slightly, but here it reads like you’re scapegoating them as a means of vindicating Chavez and his policies. After 14 years, we should recognize them as having failed and him as having been responsible for them and their failures.

            “But I think that if in any other country the media turned on the government inducing a bloody upraise against a democratic elected president, that they wouldn’t have walked unreprehended.”

            You can justify it how ever you’d like, but what happened here was that the opposition lost their voice as a form of political pay back. It was, after all, possible to punish the people responsible without taking away the oppositions ability to get its own views and opinions out to the public at large. Its no accident that Chavez chose a course of action that left him and his party with a near monopoly on the media, and it isn’t very hard to see how this could have been motivated by his own political self interest.

            And really, that was the problem with Chavez, as it is with any other Caudillo/Peronist/Bonapartist/Populist Demigod. Reform and social progress are only a pretense they could use to consolidate political power. Although I will concede that Chavez is better than the average here in that he did use elections in some cases to do it. Its hard to look at his record and say that he wasn’t another in a long line of Latin American strongmen with a background in the military, regardless of what the two existing narratives on the man might say.

            And lets be honest, the man’s reputation in the outside world has much more to do with his penchant for putting a stick in the west’s eye while treating the perceived enemy of his enemy as his friend, than it does with his tendency to strong are his opposition or his ruinous economic policies. Frankly, when judging him as a head of state, those policies should be brought to the fore front for appraisal. If we do that, its hard to regard him as anything other than a failure.

            TL;DR: Chavez’s time in office has indeed proved that the politics of failure have failed.

          • the other guy

            I agree with you in that that Chavez polices failed in the long run. So believe when I tell I am not scapegoating any one… Still that does not prevent me from seeing a more holistic picture of the situation. The opposition failed almost as much as Chavez did and this is a fact.

            They failed to oppose the government in a efficient manner. Heck it took them more than a decade to even unify against Chavez.

            When the country needed them most they turned tail to Miami, Peru, Chile or Colombia. Leaving their supporters leaderless more than once, only to recycle some old politician of the 4th republic that no one from either side trusted or cared about.

            You say Chavez strong his adversaries, and in some cases it was true, but it reads like whitewashing history when no one mentions the opposition where the first ones to sabotage and bully a democratic ELECTED government during his first years. Every action has a reaction, and this portrayal of the opposition as some sort of innocent victims, is ludicrous.

            The story of Chavez as a Caudillo -like you like to call him- is also the story of a failed opposition.

            About the media, I am not saying it was right to “close” the stations, but nevertheless it was a valid move within the laws of the country. I don’t know any other example where insurgents and traitors fail a Coup and then get to walk unscratched with all their money and freedoms intact, exempting of course the freedom of the Junta that assumed power for 48 hours in 2002.

            If you can tell of other examples in history where punishment of insurgent media had gone they way you say it, I will consider your argument.

            Finally, I believe it is too extreme to say that the opposition “lost their voice” when they almost won the past election. Never in history have they been so close of wining.

            It is true, however that they did have to campaign under very unfavorable circumstances and that things MIGHT have gone better for them if they had been on even ground.

            But saying the the political opposition has no voice in Venezuela it is absurd, Venezuela is the only country in the world that I know of, where journalist say what they want say, when ad where they want to say it up to the point of libel and on REGULAR basis. Not even in other Latin American countries with more democratic “regimes” does the media behave the way they do in Venezuela.

          • mattsm84

            “You say Chavez strong [armed] his adversaries, and in some cases it was true, but it reads like whitewashing history when no one mentions the opposition”

            Does it also grind your gears that people tend not to mention Kerensky when they talk about the October revolution?

            What I’m saying is that the opposition was all but locked out of power by the Chavistas, and that there is a fairly good chance that they would have done a better job running things given how uniformly poor Chavez’s policies turned out. Whether or not the political opposition they mounted was effective, or even underhanded, is frankly besides the point.

            Chavez undeniably nationalized industries, seized assets, rewrote his nation’s constitution to consolidate power within his party, prevented member’s of the opposition from running for office, shuttered media outlets hostile to his administration. You’ve even admitted that these elections didn’t happen on an even footing. Beyond that he sold himself as a Bolivarist for years–Simon Bolivar being the ur example of a Caudillo. For you or anyone to ignore that while trying to make him out to be some kind of social democrat is the real white wash here.

            “I don’t know any other example where insurgents and traitors fail a Coup and then get to walk unscratched with all their money and freedoms intact”

            I can think of a guy in Venezuela who just died that participated in a failed coup 1993, was sentenced to 30 years in prison–although it was latter knocked down to 3–who was latter allowed to run for president.

            EDIT: poor form on my part for this other example of a guy with a successful career in politics following a failed coup.

          • the other guy

            “I can think of a guy in Venezuela who just died that participated in a failed coup 1993, was sentenced to 30 years in prison–although it was latter knocked down to 3–who was latter allowed to run for president.”

            Two years, actually… And his does not say anything, really. Because I was clearly talking about Media stations, in relation with political insurgency. And again, I am still waiting for an example…

            “What I’m saying is that the opposition was all but locked out of power by the Chavistas”

            And this also fails to to admit how the opposition blocked itself out of power. How is this not white washing?

            I am not selling Chavez as anything, all I do is remit to the facts. If fail to ignore the historical dialectics in the social context of things, well, that’s up to you.

            “and that there is a fairly good chance that they would have done a
            better job running things given how uniformly poor Chavez’s policies
            turned out”

            The words of “ifs”and “probably”have little place in history. Things happen as they did and to loose one self in a imaginary world is quite irresponsible.

          • mattsm84

            “I was clearly talking about Media stations, in relation with political insurgency.”

            Yea, I’m not going to waste any time tracking down any additional information on that specific circumstance. A precedence, or lack of a precedence, wouldn’t justify what he did there. And because he did it, you can’t say that he never bullied opposition media into silence, rather that poor behavior was somehow justified, which I am not convinced that it was.

            “And this also fails to to admit how the opposition blocked itself out of power.”

            You mean after he’d rewritten the constitution and packed to courts? They’d already been marginalized to a point were very little they did mattered.

  • Steve

    I think most Chinese are upset because in Latin America, they have REAL communists who aren’t afraid to do it RIGHT. Stop pretending to be something and actually being something else. Chavez is respect by a LOT in the outside world.

    China has already gone back to the drugs and prostitution days the Communists worked hard cleaning up. Now the rich run the country, the poor are still poor. It’s capitalism, and while we think it’s building and creating, its actually a veiled disaster waiting to happen. Fuck the rich. Everyone on this planet deserves equal love, care, and support.

    • don mario

      strange post. unhappy china doesn’t fit the definition of communism but you go ahead and label it another thing it doesn’t fit into.

    • meo fio

      “Fuck the rich. Everyone on this planet deserves equal love, care, and support.”

      dat contradiction

      • HaakonKL

        Dude, the rich need to get laid too.

    • Chang Liu

      No they don’t, that notion is ridiculous. People need to have had fought and shed blood for their rights in order for it to be meaningful. Democratic institutions that protects individual rights did not happen by magic. They evolved out of historical circumstances and if you where to just dump it on everyone it will not work.

      • meo fio

        My opinion on individual rights is closer to Marx: “so-called rights of man, the droits de l’homme as distinct from the droits du citoyen, are nothing but the rights of a member of civil society – i.e., the rights of egoistic man, of man separated from other men and from the community”

        • Chang Liu

          How could you arrive at man outside of a societal context? Such abstract notion suffers from the a common fallacy which is that man is always shaped by its societal role and cannot be separated from it and be meaningfully discussed in terms his/her rights. There is no decontextualised absolute ‘man’ to start with. Marx had this ridiculous notion of the ‘noble savage’ and that our ancestor lived in harmony with nature, which is a 18th century romantic invention with absolutely no scientific basis. Loads of teleological nonsense.

          • the other guy

            I suggest you read The Fall by Steve Taylor. He pose’s that there was in fact a “primitive socialism” and he bases his research of plenty of archeological data.

          • Chang Liu

            I am sure there is, thats not the same as the ‘noble savage’ and the popular 18th century belief that all early humans lead a relatively egalitarian life in harmony with their surroundings. Or that Hegelian Dialectical history is a scientific concept.

          • Actually Marx very clearly does not talk about some abstract “man”, but says that man can only be seen within its societal context?

          • Chang Liu

            To talk about the Right of man and Right of Citizen does necessitate certain essentialisation of what those notions are. And as far as I can see he is deeply influenced by popular notions of he day.

    • Rebel scum.

  • Alex

    Un cabron menos.

    • Alex

      vos eres cabron

      • grovesman

        carbon credits

  • Alex

    少了一个SB

    • Chang Liu

      That will happen when you jump off a tall building.

      • Or if your mom aborted you

        Alex

  • Mr.Ant

    Selective picking of post I see, there’s plenty of grievers in China for Chavez, far more than a select few disrespectful postings. In the age of information and wide dissemination of information, blogs like these are not fooling anyone. Chinese people are not stupid, and I feel insulted just reading a blatantly propagandized blog like this.

    • mr.wiener

      Care to supply us with some examples? No really I’d appreciate it if you would. I too was surprised at the largely negative posts seen above, but maybe it’s getting to the point that the liking that Chinese netizins have for some one who tweaks America’s nose is outweighed by their closeness to China’s govt and the ecconomic favoritism they receive.
      When Osama Bin Laden was killed I was surprised at the level of support for him in China, but of course there was someone who had hurt America , but was not seen as being in bed with the Chinese govt.

    • Reila90

      The writer is 老外. You know..

    • Kai

      Not exactly. Look at the most upvoted comments on the NetEase articles linked. You can make an argument that NetEase has a lot of pro-West sympathizers or Chinese government critics just as we could make an argument that a site like Tiexue has a lot of nationalists, but I think Ryan has been faithful to our editorial mission and methodology. We clearly cite our sources for a reason.

      I agree with you that there are plenty of grievers in China for Chavez (though even more people who don’t really know or care who he is), but like it or not, NetEase is a popular Chinese web portal and upvoted comments are upvoted comments. Before accusing us of propaganda, try to at least understand the limitations of how we do things and the characteristics of the Chinese internet landscape.

    • 900DeadPigsinHuangPuRiver
    • You’re an idiot.

    • Ma

      I don’t like Chavez, and I’m Chinese…

  • Tey

    Some people just love being controlled. They will support any dictator who does not listen to the people. Whereas they ridicule leaders of the free world any chance they get. I can agree with any pro-dictatorship comments as long as the commenters actually lived under one!

    • Chang Liu

      Hmmm. In your world view what other systems exists beside dictatorships and democracies?

    • Dr Sun

      I know, they support the same old Elephant, just with a different face, without question and carry their card with pride.
      Always Reminds me of that scene from “Jungle book”

    • the other guy

      So after almost 14 years , where all sorts of things happened, good & bad, all you can remember is the “they ridicule leaders of the free world” Are you serious? man, where do you read your news? I Bet is FOX…

      Besides, I don’t think the “Leaders of the Free World” need anyone’s help being ridiculous. Specially when most of the united nations oppose a ridiculous war and the “Leaders of the Free World” use they ridiculous veto power to still invade a ridiculous nation that as “it tuns out” does not have any ridiculous weapons of mass destruction, but they still invade it any way, killing and destroys things just to label them with the ridiculous title of “Collateral Damage” and the even more ridiculous “Insurgents”

      Thant, my friends is very ridiculous all by itself.

      • the other guy

        So after almost 14 years , where all sorts of things happened, good &
        bad, all you can remember is the “they ridicule leaders of the free
        world” Are you serious? man, where do you read your news? I Bet is
        FOX…

        Besides, I don’t think the “Leaders of the Free World” need anyone’s
        help being ridiculous. Specially when most of the united nations oppose
        a ridiculous war and the “Leaders of the Free World” use they
        ridiculous veto power to still invade a ridiculous nation that as “it
        tuns out” does not have any ridiculous weapons of mass destruction, but
        they still invade it any way, killing and destroys things just to label
        them with the ridiculous title of “Collateral Damage” and the even more
        ridiculous “Insurgents”

        Thant, my friends is very ridiculous all by itself.

  • YourSupremeCommander

    Who’s Huge Chavez?

    • The biggest Chavez you will ever know.

    • linette lee

      He is extremely popular among the latin people. He was the president of venezuela and he loved making outrageous speeches. He danced and sang on TV.

      • Chang Liu

        I think you missed the point…

      • MrT

        hahahahahahahahaha, and you in New York!

        You blonde?

    • Kai

      LoL, d’oh! I’ve gone ahead and fixed that.

    • Germandude

      That’s probably the nickname of Hugo’s best friend, if you know what I mean.

      • mr.wiener

        I call mine Mr. Salami :)

        • Germandude

          No offense, but I wouldn’t even be surprised if that was true ;-)

          • A guy

            Rico suave.

  • grand

    why only select comments that are negative to chaves when 90%+ of the comments posted were supportive of him? what nonsense is this? whoever translated this, what’s you agenda behind this?

    • BiggJ

      It’s to get people talking about how Chinese are ass holes. We don’t care about the 90% that are alright, just the 10 % that are dicks. And then judge all of China by the 10%. If this web page was “CHinaeverythingsuperhappyhour”…nobody would come here to read anything. It isn’t any fun when they make chinese look like normal humans.

      • linette lee

        “CHinaeverythingsuperhappyhour”

        I like this title better than chinasmack. lol

      • radbab

        …although when I first came here it were more the funny offbeat news that made me come back. Nowadays it’s a lot of WTF? news that really make you wonder about humanity in a really bad way. I wouldn’t mind if Chinasmack would change its direction a bit towards the more funny, weird and exotic. was just more entertaining

      • MrT

        My day to day experiences puts it at 80%ass holes.
        10% alright. The rest i cant work out.
        10% is still a lot of people thou! So all good for me;-)

    • Kai

      Why are the most upvoted comments on NetEase “negative” to Chavez? Why does the Chinese media present him as a friend to the Chinese people? Why the seeming difference between what you expect and what you see? What are the possible causes for the difference? What evidence do you have to support your arguments and position?

      All questions you should be asking.

      • Chang Liu

        Thats easy. China hasn’t had deep or meaningful relationship with Venezuela. The trade relation is almost entirely comprised of Oil and weapons. For CCTV to all of sudden claim Chavez was a friend of Chinese people? Well people are not stupid, and they hate CCTV.

        • Kai

          I was suggesting questions for grand to think about as mental exercises before jumping to the conclusions and making the accusations he did.

          You offered an an answer for why Chinese netizens might be negative to Chavez (which I don’t disagree with). However, my response to grand was aimed towards getting people to think about why certain comments or sentiments are popular or unpopular amongst specifically NetEase commenters, about the intersection between mainstream media and the diversity of online public opinion, about personal biases and fallacies.

          I don’t think people should jump to assumptions of nefarious agendas just because they see information they don’t expect or like.

          • Chang Liu

            Sometimes even rhetorical questions have answers.

          • Kai

            No, I understand that. I was explaining what I was trying to do. I believe asking questions is often more important than having answers ready.

        • Kai

          That’s definitely one possibility, but for what though? For the prevalence of grieving sentiments on the Chinese internet? On NetEase? How did they lose to those posting negative comments against Chavez and those voting those comments up? What about their accusations that there are internet commenters paid by foreign forces intent on destabilizing China through public opinion? Just as they think they are the ones trying to guide public opinion in the “right” direction, they often suggest the existence of another side. This is what I think is interesting about sentiments online in China, and then we have to ask ourselves, what’s our evidence and arguments?

  • Irvin

    I had to take a transfer at Caracas airport once and I was afraid to leave the airport and that all I gotta say.

    • Chang Liu

      Why? Afraid Chavez was out there personally with a baseball bat ready to go wild on your ass?

      • Irvin

        Have you even been to Venezuela? It’s an extreme police state, I was just at the airport and got asked for my passport twice. One of my friend who was veneszulian born Chinese told me if he went back now he’ll get kidnap right outta the airport.

        I admit I acted on presumption but with the information I had then what would you have done?

        • the other guy

          No crap, they asked for your passport in an airport?

          All sarcasm aside, the reason why controls are so tight in the airports it is because Venezuela is the gate for Colombian and Peruvian drugs, that are smuggled up the border in to Europe and North America.

          It can be irritating, sure, but calling it a police state? Did you actually go to the street to find out? Please if anything Venezuela lacks policing, specially with all the crime rate skyrocketing.

          • Irvin

            Asked for passport while sitting on a bench by people that dress like Fidel Castro? Never happened anywhere else for me.

          • the other guy

            It still is their duty if you are suspected of smuggling drugs. I know plenty of people that have been to Venezuela many times, and this is the first time I hear about this. Irritating, sure… Unnecessary, I don’t think so…

        • Chang Liu

          Checked it out for myself?

    • the other guy

      Great story, Irvin. Great story…

  • linette lee

    Chavez he is a cool guy. He made some outrageous speech against usa president. “I smell evil in the house” when bush was voted president. “The house smell good” when obama was voted president. Hahaha…he is something.

    • Chang Liu

      Did he end each sentence with brruuuuf?

  • meo fio

    Jiang Zemin and Hu Jintao’s ancestrial hometown is xuancheng, Anhui; no wonder they both look like southerner.

    • Chinese

      And Xi Jinping looks like Chavez.

  • Dr Sun

    Like him or not, he was democratically elected by the popular vote. No electoral college needed to “fix it” so he could become president..

    • A guy

      This says it all.

      http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/09/opinion/frum-chavez-venezuela

      And really you are gonna bring up the electoral college? It doesn’t do what you think it does. The votes have to go the way the state voted. The electoral college is used to ensure states rights as it stands today. Was it envisioned as a tool to avoid populist missteps? yes, but as it stands today it does not serve that purpose. Today it only serves to treat each state as having it’s own voting rights. I think it is archaic and needs to be removed, but it is not a tool to silence the masses. Where as almost every policy Chavez implemented was.

      • Dr Sun

        seriously CNN ? *raises eyebrows *

        • A guy

          Yes seriously. Do you want me to quote something like al-jazeera that would gloss over all the bad in the interest of supporting a “people power” agenda. Yes the article was heavy handed, but elections don’t happen in vacuums and threats, unfair media practices are other ways to rig an election. Did more Venezuelans want him in power? yes apparently, did his opponents get a fair shot to make their case? No. You need both answers to be yes for it to be free and fair elections. I think the book this article is reviewing would be a good read.

          On another unrelated note.
          Did I despise this man? Absolutely.
          Do I hope he is in heaven? Yes.
          I respect that he was a human being and hope those who mourn him can find peace, but in the midst of this we cannot neglect to show his true legacy as a leader.

          http://www.economist.com/news/books-and-arts/21573084-stimulating-biography-great-showman-and-bad-president-who-died-aged-58

      • Chang Liu

        You realised because of his justifiably anti US stance, there were a documented but failed plot at a coup early during his reign right? I am not sure US news sources are going to be unbiased about him. Wish someone can point me to a more objective measure of weather he was good for the country.

        • A guy

          Hello (insert wildly unfounded assertion here but end it with a question mark so it’s not a statement) see that is why all news sources from said country are no good.

          I have one for you.

          Didn’t Chang Liu masturbate at a elementary school playground last week? I’m not sure his mother should be working to root out molestation in schools. Can’t we get a more objective employee to tell me what perverse acts are.

          • the other guy

            Watch South of the Border by Oliver Stone of War on Democracy by John Pilger. They show very well how most of the US media was biased towards Chavez.

            I am not saying the man was a saint, but still most of the media was completely bias.

          • mattsm84

            Oliver Stone is famous for his level headed political commentary, rather than that he can be a bit of nut.

          • the other guy

            Watch the documentary first and then tell me is American media is not bias or you can choose to watch one from a “real”journalist. John Pilger is after all very respected in the field…

          • Chang Liu

            Are you saying CNN is unbiased towards Venezuela? Read ‘Manufacturing Consent’ to understand the relationship of news production and Imperialism.

          • mattsm84

            Well, if Noam Chomsky says it then it must be true…

          • Chang Liu

            Maybe maybe not, sure is better then uninformed guesses.

  • Chavez finds friendship with dictators than any democratically elected leaders. That says his characters.

    • Dr Sun

      OMG, that’s so funny considering how many dictators America put in place in Latin America.
      And how many Latin American generals learnt their skills at the “College of America” Georgia USA..

      • the other guy

        I know, right…

      • A guy

        You are right. It was under the fear of the spread of communism, and the whole world hung in the balance in the US’s eyes, but it doesn’t excuse it and it is the main cause of America’s image problem in Latin America. (I am a horrible writer run-on much) It was college of the America’s, by the way. If you compare the reasons you’ll find a deference in the character however. One did it for show, the other to try to keep the world away from nuclear holocaust. Just saying, but good point though.

        • the other guy

          Tell that to the the families of all the people who where tortured or disappeared during the reign of US backed dictators, See how they feel.

          • A guy

            Tell that to all the families of the innocent civilians that were killed or raped by leftist rebels during those years as well. Things aren’t black and white and even then US aid came with conditions that were often broken by those dictatorships. The US tried to do as much as it could to hold the region together and keep it from falling into chaos. You can look back and cast stones at what certain people did or didn’t do or you can look at what is going on now.

    • Chang Liu

      As far as I understand most of SA is democratically elected except Cuba. And he is pretty chummy with all of them. Logic FAIL.

  • MrT

    We all love oil!

  • cb4242

    Good riddance.

  • naxi

    All baddies are friends of China. Hitler, Stalin, Saddam Huessin, Pol Pot, Kim Il-sung, Gaddafi you name it. I can only conclude that China itself is a baddy.

    • DavidisDawei

      Everyone needs “friends”….
      The ‘enemy’ of your ‘enemy’ is your friend.

  • Henry

    :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

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