Super Typhoon Haiyan Hits the Philippines, Chinese Reactions

The damaged houses in Iloilo of the Philippines after the attack of the typhoon.

From NetEase:

Super Typhoon “Haiyan” May Cause Thousands of Deaths in the Philippines

The central region of the Philippines has been attacked by super typhoon “Haiyan” for days. This typhoon is considered the strongest typhoon that the Philippines has encountered in history and as of the 10th, it has caused 151 deaths though local authorities reckon the number of deaths may continue to rise. However, according to the estimates by the Red Cross of the Philippines, when super typhoon “Haiyan” hit, more than 1,000 people died in the coastal city Tacloban and, in another severely afflicted area Samar, there were also at least more than 200 deaths. According to Peng Meiyu, General Secretary of the Red Cross of the Philippines, 1,000 deaths is only an “approximate figure”. From ChinaNews.

The damaged houses in Iloilo of the Philippines after the attack of the typhoon.

Picture is an aerial photo showing the damaged houses in Iloilo of the Philippines after the typhoon hit, on November 11, local time.

Survivors are waiting for the rescue after the attack of the typhoon.

Tacloban City of the Philippines, survivors waiting for rescue after the typhoon hit.

The airport of Acloban City of the Philippines is a mess after the attack of the typhoon.

The airport of Tacloban City of the Philippines in a mess after the typhoon hit.

Acloban City of the Philippines is a mess after the attack of the typhoon.

Acloban City of the Philippines is a mess after the attack of the typhoon.

Some survivors of the typhoon attack are transferring the dead body of a victim.

Survivors of the typhoon transporting the dead body of a victim.

Palawan of the Philippines, a mess scene after the typhoon attack.

Palawan of the Philippines, in a mess after the typhoon hit.

People are walking on the city road after the typhoon attack.

People walking on the city road after the typhoon.

Children are playing in the ruins after the typhoon attack.

Children playing in the ruins after the typhoon.

Comments from NetEase:

漫舞天下 [网易山东省烟台市网友]:

May the dead rest in peace.

永权3 [网易浙江省杭州市手机网友]:

A natural disaster! I pray for the disaster-stricken people! Hope Aquino can stop laughing.

网易湖南省株洲市手机网友 ip:175.4.*.*:

May the deceased rest in peace…

正义之聲 [网易广东省中山市网友]:

What people are doing, God is watching. They have committed to many wicked deeds, and God can tolerate it no longer. Also, many regions in out country are still in difficulties, I hope [the government] won’t take our taxpayers’ money and donate it to those Philippine dogs.

网易辽宁省盘锦市手机网友 ip:221.202.*.*: (responding to above)

I agree.

哎哟嗷喂 [网易广东省深圳市网友]:

Can people stop being so extreme, OK? The deceased are all ordinary common people. Everyone of them was a living life~~~

网易福建省厦门市手机网友 ip:211.97.*.*:

The Philippines, a dog-like country.

网易福建省手机网友 ip:58.22.*.*:

Sigh! No matter what, it’s a natural disaster! It’s too horrible to look at! The typhoon was so terrible, over 10, with winds of several hundred kilometers per hour!

网易山东省潍坊市网友 ip:112.243.*.*:

Good timing, praise!

芳華绝代 [网易福建省厦门市网友]:

Good, very good.

网易安徽省合肥市手机网友 ip:223.240.*.*:

Pray for them!

Comments from Sohu:

搜狐新闻客户端网友 [搜狐广东省广州市网友]:

We hereby show our greatest sympathy to the Philippines for the natural disaster they have suffered. We will promote humanitarian spirit: organize the Filipinos in China to raise money, and then donate it to the Philippines in the name of China! Those who agree, please repost/forward! [5,060 upvotes at time of translation]

天涯醉酒 [手机搜狐网友]:

Does this count as karma???

搜狐新闻客户端网友 [搜狐辽宁省沈阳市网友]:

Don’t be like this, have some compassion. Those who perished are all ordinary common people.

搜狐新闻客户端网友 [搜狐网友]:

When facing natural disasters, humans are very fragile. This isn’t karma. People are dead. Have a little decency.

搜狐新闻客户端网友 [搜狐江苏省南京市网友]:

It should be karma, but no matter what, may the deceased rest in peace.

曹孟徳的春天 [搜狐广东省阳江市网友]:

Are you still human beings or not! Over ten thousand people are dead! Those who died are people, not pigs. People are dead and you’re still laughing at other people’s misfortunes. You don’t deserve to be Chinese. Chinese people have been hailed as a land of etiquette and manners since ancient times and we’re always talking about how great our people are in this or that way, but I guess we’re all idiots making jokes [proving ourselves wrong]. The people of the Philippines are innocent and you should treat the matter separately [politics from people]. Although we can’t donate, we still shouldn’t be laughing at their misfortune! Is this the kind of talk the sons and daughters of great China should be saying? it’s not me being self-righteous, we can’t let the Americans look down upon us, and we can’t let the Japanese look down upon us even more. We mustn’t let others look down upon Chinese people.

搜狐新闻客户端网友 [搜狐湖北省武汉市网友]:

Oppose China providing help to the Philippines. If you are Chinese, ding this up! [1,046 upvotes during the time of translation]

QQ缘1205在搜狐 [搜狐甘肃省网友]:

The earthquake in Japan, the typhoon in the Philippines. It’s good that they have happened, and happened at the right times.

逍遥剑客0319 [搜狐湖南省网友]:

Ha ha ha! So happy! Why couldn’t it have blown Aquino the bastard to death. It would’ve been even better! … Ha ha ha!

浅末年华55966281 [搜狐四川省网友]:

Oh, I see, not important. I pray we won’t do the same stupid thing we did in 2011 after the tsunami hit Japan, when China donated 20,000 tons of oil and 20,000 tons of diesel for free.

Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • Probotector

    They couldn’t resist making a few slurs could they? China: a nation of hate.

    Also, sofa!

    • Cauffiel

      Quite of few, I’d say.

      • mr.wiener

        But not all,do I dare think common sense is breaking out in china?

        • Cauffiel

          No, it could only be that the education system is starting to falter, or they are shifting their distribution of disdain and contempt to other more resource rich venues.

  • mr.wiener

    “What people are doing, God is watching. They have committed to many wicked deeds, and God can tolerate it no longer. Also, many regions in out country are still in difficulties, I hope [the government] won’t take our taxpayers’ money and donate it to those Philippine dogs.”

    I can’t help thinking of the ancient wiccan lore that what ever bad you wish on people comes back on you three fold. Fortunately the bulk of the replies above are not as petty and spiteful as this. If the Chinese had some smarts they’d park a battle group of their navy [after they re-name it to something different from the PRC army/navy] off the coast of the Phillipines and start flying in supplies and aid.

    • Guest23

      I kinda anticipated these kind of reactions, but still a bit sad on the loss of life, helping with the relief works by collecting goods to send, the super typhoon was pretty much the strongest we ever had for the entire year, bad enough we still got problems to solve before all of this.

      Pretty pessimistic of me to think what will the they say after the typhoon is done with Vietnam, hope they are prepared.

    • Cauffiel

      Why would they ever do that in a longtime American ally and country facilitating U.S. Naval bases?

      • mr.wiener

        Good will mate, good will.
        You remember that big arse eathquake they had in Turkey where the Greeks sent a whole bunch of aid? It ended centuries of hatred and mistrust in one fell swoop.

        • whuddyasack

          Wiener, don’t get me wrong. I do agree and believe in showing good will even if it means to help a country that is geopolitically in opposition with your own.

          “It ended centuries of hatred and mistrust in one fell swoop.”

          However, I wished the above was actually true. However, it isn’t so. During the 2011 Earthquake, the Chinese did show good will and sent aid to Japan. Incidentally, a few years back in 08, the Japanese had done the same for China. To make matters worse, the general media did not try nor intend to capitalize on this to settle the issue once and for all even if there were Chinese and Japanese who were brought closer over this.

          However, petty grudges and grievances didn’t end there. Some of the commentators here seem to seethe in that old mindset of “the ungrateful recipient”.

          Many failed to see that there were in fact many Japanese/Chinese who were grateful for what the other had done and it isn’t hard to find comments showing actual appreciation for foreign good will; I’ve read one comment where a Japanese girl who couldn’t understand the animosity the “Chinese” had for her people and she wrote that during 3/11, the Japanese truly appreciated and were grateful for the Chinese that did decide to help, feeling closer towards them. Needless to say, it was clear that the rash actions of the demonstrators had a very negative affect on her views.

          Which was very saddening. Saddening because people always choose to focus on the bad. I wish more Chinese broadened their horizons and look at the bigger picture instead of looking at everyone as an enemy.

          But then again, that’s humanity. As a species, we’d much prefer to believe in “losing our faith in humanity” then seeking outlets and taking action to restore that faith.

          • Riddler

            Hey, I’m sorry for the past shit. Really. In moments like this we realise that petty arguments pale in the face of tragedy. I offer a hand to you in friendship and apology should you accept. Your comments are admirable Sir.

          • whuddyasack

            Hey Riddler, I’m sorry too. You needn’t worry too much about things on your end, it might not look like it, but I don’t really take internet brawls too personally. I actually did have some good laughs over your comments and enjoyed reading them especially the one about the colors in a person.

            It’s just the internet and we’re bound to go overboard with our words and egos.

            You are right, in difficult times, we are united and overcome our pettiness. It’s our moment to shine as human beings and rise above politics and personal grudges.That’s the beauty of it all.

            I can’t put it better myself than what yuri has written here:

            http://www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/coast-guard-saves-64-chinese-seamen-from-burning-freighter

            “Think the PRC Navy would save the crew of a Japanese ship. When you are out there and an emergency happens, politics takes the rear seat. Radio to stricken ship, do you request our assistance? Then render assistance,This is a protocol as old as sea travel.”

            And she was right.

            “I offer a hand to you in friendship and apology should you accept. Your comments are admirable Sir.”

            Your offer is accepted, appreciated and much commended.

          • Riddler

            Thanks for that man. Its really odd how these things can start and turn out. Really pleased to have made peace. Likewise, I had a good giggle over many of your comments and I’m sure we will cross blades again but all in good fun and friendly needling:-) See on on the field soldier:-)

          • whuddyasack

            You are welcome and thank you.

            I’m not in the mainland at the moment, but someday I’m sure we could all meet up and have a nice chat and some drinks together.

          • Riddler

            Hmmm, i replied to this but it seems discus is slow. I’ll wait and if it doesn’t show i’ll re-type it.

          • Riddler

            But we DID have some pretty funny exchanges:-) I had to laugh at myself and actually copied/pasted some of your jokes on me. None of it was taken personally at all. As you said, it was a good laugh.

          • whuddyasack

            Good sir, you’re a good sport. ;-)

          • mr.wiener

            Can you feel the love tonight?

          • whuddyasack

            Haha, that was a good one. :)

          • mr.wiener

            No worries mate, nice to see you burying the hatchet in somewhere other than each others heads :)

        • Riddler

          Yup, and now with the greek side having economical issues, they pop over the border because daily food stuff is cheaper. The turks don’t accept money, they share what they have. Now you have turks and greeks hanging out together, sipping on tea and beers, chilling and without any discomfort. It’s a lovely thing to see.

        • Cauffiel

          Ooooh, I’m pretty sure they need to ask permission before they start parking their Navy anywhere but off their own shore.

    • whuddyasack

      “Fortunately the bulk of the replies above are not as petty and spiteful as this.”

      I agree. While there are the jerks and assholes, I was actually pleasantly surprised at the many comments that showed sympathy for the Filipinos and also those that stood up against the hateful trolls.

      ” …off the coast of the Phillipines and start flying in supplies and aid.”

      Yes, I agree. That would be the smart thing to do. Or even better, they could officially offer aid to the Government of the Philippines. That way, it’d be seen as less threatening, since it will be the Philippines that would give them the permission to enter.

      Showing goodwill and helping another country in difficult times isn’t a sign of weakness or “pansy”. Helping another, even if that other is deemed an “enemy” is the most honorable thing to do.

      • Kai

        LoL, pretty sure China wouldn’t start violating air space to air drop supplies without the permission of the Philippines government. There’s still protocol for these things.

        • whuddyasack

          Hahaha, you’re right. I admit, I did take Wiener’s initial comment too literally.

          I mean the Chinese can be crazy at times, but ramboing head with military vehicles, first into a country with aid is beyond anyone, even Chinese.

    • Kai

      I agree. While such a grand gesture won’t end regional political tensions and will inevitably be received with apprehension (it’s going to be seen as buying good will whether the Chinese government likes it or not), it’s still something that could be built upon into something better.

      Reciprocity in international aid during such natural disasters is also pretty common so it’ll be interesting to see what China does. According to Wikipedia, the Philippines donated 450k USD and a medical team to Sichuan in 2008. Mobilizing an entire battle group might be a bit lopsided in reciprocity but if you wanna be a niubi nation, you gotta do niubi things.

      Interestingly, also according to Wikipedia, Hong Kong is postponing its economic sanctions against the Philippines for the hostage situation 3 years ago. I didn’t know that was still an issue or that it even made it that far in HK politics.

      • Guest23

        They did, ironically the guy who’s in the *People Power* (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People_Power_Revolution) party in Hong Kong wants bigger sanctions against the Philippines for “humiliating the Hong Kong people”

        • Kai

          Sigh.

      • nqk123

        the whole sanction is pretty much a threat by the mainland government. Hong Kong is no longer democratic. politic is controlled by Mainland

        • dollyrama

          Hong Kongers are pretty militant when it comes to the Philippines. In fact they blamed the Mainland for not being tough enuff on the pinoys. You got it the other way around.

          • linette lee

            HONG KONG: Relief efforts and cash donations have begun pouring in in Hong Kong to help the typhoon victims in the Philippines.

            Over the weekend, the local Filipino communities also helped to raise funds and provisions to send home.

            It is a race against time to raise money and collect daily necessities for the victims of Super Typhoon Haiyan.

            Aid organisation UNICEF Hong Kong has already allocated more than US$130,000 to support the relief work. It has airlifted US$1.3 million worth of supplies, including water purification tablets, and medical kits from its warehouse in Copenhagen.

            UNICEF Hong Kong Chief Executive Irene Chan said: “We hope that in total, immediately, we can help about 13,000 families but that is not enough. We estimate 4 million children could be affected, so we have to keep up the effort.

            “The Hong Kong people have always been very generous. In the last 18 hours, we’ve got about close to HK$200,000. It’s not very big but it keeps on coming, we have a lot of enquiries from the public about the situation in the Philippines.”

            Filipino organisations in Hong Kong, like the Philippines Independent Church and even the local churches like St John’s Cathedral, have started fundraising campaigns since Sunday. Monies raised would be sent to rescue organisations in the Philippines.”

            Medicins Sans Frontieres’ (MSF) disaster management team for the region is based out of Hong Kong. It has already sent 30 specialists — medical personnel, logisticians — to Cebu and will be beefing up the number to 100 in the coming weeks.

            The two biggest problems, according to MSF, are accessibility and the ability to scale up their rescue efforts.

            MSF executive director Remi Carrier said: “Water is going to be key, treating people is going to be key. There has been a succession of disasters for the past months, and their team, the rescuers have been overstretched by the level of intervention that they have to support this year.

            “We are coordinating with the government to identify the gaps and to agree which are the areas where MSF can be useful.”

            The Hong Kong government is also seeking lawmaker approval to inject another US$5 million into its Disaster Relief Fund on Friday, in part to benefit the typhoon victims.

            http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/hong-kong-sends-aid-to/884022.html

          • dollyrama

            Most of the donations are from local pinoys working in HK and foreign NGOs based in HK, not HKers. Please read the article properly.

    • Germandude

      The Chinese actually do help by sending support to the Phillippines, I read that Chinese catastrophe units are already on their way.

      What I don’t understand though is the following: The Phillippines knew this was coming at least 3 days prior to the hit. How come they totally ignored taking any precautions and get people out of there and made sure that aid is close-by?

      • Guest23

        Preparations were made, but they weren’t enough, matter of fact, truth be told we had to contend with an earthquake and a city-siege in the months before, our resources were spread too thin, and no one expected the typhoon to be like a tsunami, we get them a lot on years on end, but never to this extent.

        • Germandude

          I know, but it still looks like it wasn’t prepared properly. I can’t stop but feel that the fact that a very poor part of the country was hit lead to “less than stellar” preparations.
          No offense and I know I might be wrong on this. I am just overwhelmed by the pictures and tragical stories…

          • Guest23

            Understandable, we should have made better preparations, but as usual politics, bureaucracy, and corruption takes a prime lead than to safety, our national disaster response organizations have crappy equipment, budget that seems to disappear, don’t get me wrong, the people who are in those agencies try to do more with less, we’re a disaster-prone country. But it isn’t really a time for that, we’ll have to take responsibility later, not play the blame game, my mom’s side of the family lived right on the path of the typhoon, thank god they managed to get to safety, but the damage is surreal.

          • Germandude

            Excuse my ignorance. I didn’t know you were Phillippino… Good to know everybody on your side is safe.

            Also note that I am by no means blaming the people. Just the government.

          • Guest23

            Thanks, by the way, correct spelling is either “Pilipino” or “Filipino”, no worries, we kinda have this crab mentality that we try to get other people down to our level, but we try to rise above it, the government is blamed but also the people for always electing these dangs actors or crooked politicians and their promises to the senate, that will be another story.

          • Riddler

            Condolences to you Sir for this disaster on your country. Hearts and prayers with you. Please ignore the shameless comments left above by heartless creatures.

            May God grant you patience and strength in this moment of pain…words just cannot suffice..

      • winterbitten

        I want to say in conjunction to the reasons that have been mentioned, there are probably plenty of stubborn people who were not willing to leave as well as people who downplayed power of this storm and thought they could wait it out in their homes.

    • David

      The U.S. Navy/Marines are already carrying out rescue/relief efforts. Hopefully Japan, Korea and China will also add their services (hey what would Korea men do without the Philippines to visit? lol).

  • BigBaddWolf

    Chinese – dogs and pieces of shit to the end

    • Probotector

      I’m sure China will manufacture an event from the past in which Filipinos wronged them somehow in order to justify their hate.

      • Guest23

        They already did, it wasn’t so hot years ago, but they really keep the heat up with the constant media news of our wrong doings, real or imaginative, justified or unjustified.

    • mr.wiener

      All Chinese? Jumping to conclusions is a poor form of exercise.

      • Probotector

        Many Chinese wouldn’t think so.

        • Kai

          Why emulate the very thing you have contempt for?

          • Probotector

            If you read carefully, I said “Many Chinese”, not all Chinese Troll elsewhere.

          • DearDairy

            He’s got a point Kai.

          • Kai

            If you read carefully, I didn’t say you said “all”. I asked “why emulate the very thing you have contempt for.”

            I agree with @mrwiener:disqus that “jumping to conclusions is a poor form of exercise.” I think your penchant to turn his general statement into a specific one about the Chinese belies certain motivations but what I said is still different from what you’re saying I said.

            @deardairy:disqus

            As do I?

        • Riddler

          Well that is true!

    • DearDairy

      taking it too far. superlatives! you should at least say “most” so your argument could be somewhat defensible.

    • Riddler

      That is one fucked up comment. You need your head examined. One day, some bad shit will happen to you and it will be a chinese person who comes and saves your ass. Moron.

    • David

      “to the end” You mean like the end of the empire whose symbol you use (the one that no longer exists)? Are you still mad because Mao and Khrushchev didn’t play nice together?

  • Cauffiel

    Looks like Netease and Sohu could use chinasmack’s snappy new email verification policy, or at least a few needlessly employed internet police to at least control the genuine racism.

    • Kai

      Hate to break it to you, but our snappy new email verification policy isn’t really to control racism.

      • Germandude

        I assume it’s to counter multiple nicknames?

        • Cauffiel

          Nicknames are much worse than racism.

          • Germandude

            Nah, I assume it is countering multiple nicknames because it destroys any kind of discussion in the sense of people not knowing who they are talking with?

          • Cauffiel

            What’s in a name? A Robert Rou by any other name smells as douchey.

        • Kai

          It’s for a number of reasons. Have you seen our announcement post? http://www.chinasmack.com/2013/announcements/changes-to-comment-policy-verification-of-email-addresses.html

          If it is of any small comfort to @Cauffiel:disqus , some genuine and casual racism will inevitably be affected by this comment policy change. I’m just saying our policy of not moderating on the basis of what may be racist alone remains.

      • Cauffiel

        Seriously? How can you Jew us like that?

        • Kai

          -_-;

  • Guest23

    Glad to see some compassionate comments, bit disappointed but not so surprising to see that a lot of Chinese still go with the “Asian totem pole” with regards to my compatriots, unbelievable with these grudges.

    • Cauffiel

      I was surprised when I first learned Chinese look down on the Philippines. What the hell did Filipino’s ever do to anyone?

      • Guest23

        Regional rivalries, we’re allied with the US, and the not so surprising thing is racism, we’re the underdog, but to them we’re a dog who bites the hand that feeds them, not so much racial conflict between Chinese or Filipinos that much, we got a huge Filipino-Chinese community here, this hate has a lot to do with the Manila hostage stand-off and Spratly Islands.

        • David

          I was just going to ask if it was aggravated by economic factors (i.e. Spratly islands, fishing/oil rights in the ocean near the Philippines that China claims etc…). That tends to get governments upset and then they like to turn their people against other nationalities. However this was a humanitarian disaster which will only get worse.

          • Guest23

            Astonishing estimate of 9 Billion dollars worth of damages of property, bad enough we’re still computing damages for the earthquake last month ago and the Zamboanga siege two months ago.

            The looting and search for the missing and dead is quite serious, people are desperate and any areas not affected are bringing in volunteers and relief goods quickly.

    • whuddyasack

      Guest23, thank you for a balanced view and not holding all Chinese accountable for the indefensible. If it’s any comfort to you, those comments actually made me sick. I’m proud that many of my compatriots chose to stand up against such blatant “crap”.

      Such a disappointment and disgrace. If someone did say the same things about the Chinese during their typhoons and earthquakes, they would be outraged. So I don’t really think what they did was appropriate, it was disgusting.

      And you’re right about the grudges; They’re petty. As for “Asian totem poles”, that’s equally ridiculous. In my eyes, Filipinos have a lot to be proud of, and I think humility, openness and warmth is generally a good thing. I don’t think Filipinos are lower at all, and anyone who thinks of another as lower because they are a different nationality are lowly. This is why I hate politics and excess zeal over national differences.

      So while it won’t mean much, I’ll apologize for the foolish, insensitive words of fellow Chinese.

      • Guest23

        Thanks, the internet can really bring out the dark side on some people.

        You’re right about the zeal or fanaticism over nationality, I’ve seen my fair share of idiotic Filipino netizens gloating over bad things that happened to the Chinese, a lot of us call out their bullshit excuse that they have only the balls to criticize but not think critically.

        • whuddyasack

          Wise words. And it can indeed bring out the worst in people. The veil of anonymity means cowards can make offensive, despicable and hurtful remarks with impunity.

          Those comments about donating were shocking, there’s nothing weak or treacherous about donating and helping the meek and poor (China isn’t rich either). I’d happily do it myself as I think this is a good cause.

          While some Chinese can give a lot of flak towards the Taiwanese, I’m afraid that Taiwan has shamed the “mighty PRC” here.

          http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201311110013.aspx

          Add to me seeing all blogs detailing the support groups and people wishing the best for the Philippines and the fact that there WAS a RECENT diplomatic row between Taiwan and the Philippines makes it even more deplorable.

          The hostage crisis or dispute in the Spratleys is just a lame cop out and excuse to say the inexcusable.

          Regarding Filipinos, I’ve seen the Filipinos doing the honorable and standing up for Chinese victims of disasters myself. I think with every group of people, you have the good and the bad. They say that Filipinos are always willing to smile even after being beaten down and horribly abused. I say that this saying is true and a most admirable thing.

          • Guest23

            It pretty much makes me glad that people can drop the tough guy act or bickering to work together and help one another, to all those countries that helped, thank you very much.

          • whuddyasack

            It does indeed, doesn’t it. There’s nothing worse than humanity, yet there’s nothing better about it either. It’s either the glass half full or the glass half empty for us.

            You know, usually I don’t handle topics like this very well. Seeing the hateful comments was confronting. Seeing the good comments comforting. Seeing how gracious you were, well… this might sound cliche but it did “restore my faith in humanity”.

            Above it all though was the knowledge that in spite of losing loved ones, and the tragic loss of life, Filipinos will stay strong and united, and that people around the world would support you over there. The jackasses will laugh but they will never win. I hope for the best for everyone in the Philippines, but leave with a hope and knowledge that your people and nation would overcome this like you’ve always overcome all adversities headed your way.

          • Riddler

            Hey man is that REALLY you? Respects to that comment SIr.

          • Germandude

            I have to agree. Kudos to whuddyasack for some great comments here. Far better than the usual “All foreigners in China are criminals and child-molesters” crap.

            Keep up the good work!

          • Riddler

            I actually blinked, rubbed my eyes, got a magnifying glass AND used the zoom function on the laptop to double check the name and corresponding comments. Yes, balanced and mature comments.

          • Germandude

            I actually went to church to thank god.

          • Riddler

            BWahahahaha! Excellent!

          • Germandude

            I wasn’t even joking…

          • linette lee

            You need to go more often.

          • Germandude

            Why would you care? I would not pray for you.

          • whuddyasack

            Yes, it’s me.

            @Germandude
            Thank you and appreciate your kind words.

            I think I don’t deserve the accolades from the likes of you gentlemen hahaha

          • Riddler

            Hahahha. You do, you do.

            It would be interesting for all of us to meet up one day and have a laugh over a beer. I think Probotector is looking to meet up so i think we could arrange a CS gathering. I can visualise it all, all the guys hanging out at a bar. Then Eattot arrives. it would be fun.

          • David

            lol I know Eattot bugs the heck out of many people but she does not really bother me at all (I take what she says with a huge chunk of salt) I suspect Linette would be more sociable to have a beer with (and she would probably pay for her own drinks).

      • DearDairy

        Gotta say though, most of the population isn’t so educated or ever traveled outside the country let alone their tiny village. The rational voices are more exception than the rule.

        • Kai

          Very true, but it’s nonetheless good that they’re speaking up. You need people like this to combat the ignorant, petty, and spiteful in a society.

          While it’s not like anyone who is poorly educated or has never left the country is maliciously gloating, let’s still hope the ratio of exception to rule improves. As it is, the amount of hypocritical gloating is still uncomfortably too prevalent.

          • DearDairy

            Unfortunately, China is too big a place with too big a population for that ratio to ever find a reasonable balance. We’re talking about resources for education applied evenly across the entire populace. The resources and or political will for education is weak at best now, what happens during a economic downturn, which is already happening with future GDP growth looking around 4-6% to 2020? Education will never be a priority, especially for the current regime who would prefer a population that is compliant, and doesn’t ask questions as long as their are things to buy. Additionally, money will have to go to Social Security and healthcare and environment first, otherwise, social stability cannot be managed.

            For every 1 awesome person I meet in China, there are about 100,000 not so awesome, this is not going to change is our lifetimes. Logistically impossible.

            And consider, also the brain drain. The best and brightest, the most educated, the most diligent, many of them do go overseas, and there is some percentage of those, who don’t come back.

          • Kai

            All very legitimate concerns in my opinion and my response is that I’m an optimist. If something is ever to be achieved, if improvement is ever to be made, someone has to believe in it.

            I agree that logistically it will be very unlikely that the raio will reach a balance closer to what we want in our lifetimes. People are notoriously slow to change their habits and modes of thinking so even if there is change, we’ll probably die before the norms reach levels we want.

            I probably won’t be able to travel the stars in my lifetime based on the rate of investment in space technology, but I still believe it’s possible and I’ll still celebrate whatever progress we make that gets us closer to that. That there are statistically significant numbers of Chinese netizens shaming the assholes and articulating non-assholic views, that’s still a victory in my book. This victory doesn’t mean the battle is over, but it’s good for morale.

          • Germandude

            ” If something is ever to be achieved, if improvement is ever to be made, someone has to believe in it.”

            My answer to that: “Yes we can”.

          • Kai

            Obama is a good orator.

            I just finished helping review a bunch of really obnoxious Chinese netizen comments related to this Philippines typhoon disaster. I’m demoralized again.

          • Germandude

            I read them pretty late last night and was demorilized to reply any of your comments to me. Really pathetic…

          • David

            Yea, I read them this morning and while I keep telling myself “it isn’t all like this” I have to go make myself talk to Chinese friends tonight to see what those I respect think.

          • David

            And of course we get to pick who we spend out time with and most will spend their time talking, debating and discussing with people who are worth that time.

          • Kai

            Yeah. This sort of natural selection and filtering also shapes our impressions of the world. Sometimes it’s good to take a look at what people who aren’t like us are saying and thinking. It can be disturbing, or reassuring.

          • David

            This is a good point. In the U.S. (and many other countries) owning a computer is no longer a sign of even middle class wealth, so it is very difficult to tell where people fall on the social/economic scale. However, in China, is it fair to say that almost anybody who is commenting is at least the equivalent of “lower middle class” or do they have plenty of computers and internet access in the poorer communities?

          • Guest23

            Internet cafes, they popped up a lot during the early 2000’s.

          • Kai

            They do. 网吧s (internat bars). Spending a few kuai for hours of internet access or gaming is within reach for a lot of people who are rather poor, often poorly educated, usually young.

        • whuddyasack

          Hmmm… a fair point. I can see where you’re coming from and relate.

          I did tour and visit some of the more remote and poorer areas of China, in particular around the Hunan province, which were mostly a congregation of a few houses.

          Many of those people were so poor that they could only afford to send one child to school, lacked dinner plates, wore rags etc. They were all too busy with trying to make ends meet to even care about hating others.

          • David

            Can I ask how you go about visiting an area like that? By bus? Car? I have wanted to but it seems pretty daunting when I don’t have a car in this country (I can always bring a Chinese friend with for interpreter).

          • whuddyasack

            Not a problem, it’s encouraging to see that you have an interest to visit these places. Not many people I know would like to go to such remote places and you’re right about it being a daunting process. Heck, if I were in your situation, I’d probably not even think twice about it. You could also meet a lot of different ethnic groups in the process, and while they live simply, there is beauty in their culture and traditional wear.

            Actually, this might sound stereotypical, but dad took me on a tour comprising entirely of medical volunteers because he wanted to show me how “privileged” I was. Dad’s just dad, big heart for people.

            Going with friends and an interpreter is actually a very good idea. It’s even better if you have local friends who are interested in travel or even part of some charitable organization. The thing about Chinese people is once you do find a good friend amongst them, they’d very likely be some of your closest friends for life and go the extra mile for you.

            If all else fails, try looking for tour groups in your area. If it’s hard to find a tour where you live, there are some China tours available online as well, such as China Culture Tour or the Dong Village Hotel.

          • David

            Thanks for the suggestions. Although I am a historian and not a sociologist, I came to China to study the country from a grassroots level. So it is not only important to me to get out of the city more (Wuxi is not Shanghai but it is still a city) it is much more interesting to me to see how more rural communities are set up and how people respond to those circumstances.

          • whuddyasack

            You’re welcome. And yes, visiting the rural villages is great way to understand the other side of China. The side that has not caught on with the rest of the world, no internet connection, computers, tv, etc. I remembered reading the news lately how one lady didn’t even know who the Chinese president was.

            Staying and experiencing the culture and livelihood of ethnic minorities like the Dong, Miao, Naxi, Tujia, Hani and many others is a good way to understand the history at a grassroots level and experiencing China that much better. Some of them have very violent histories, I found the Ming dynasty especially cruel towards the Miao, with their Northern and Turk armies. I’m quite fond of history, and try to keep an open mind on world history.

            I’m sorry I couldn’t help you much. I guess I made suggestions on joining charitable group trips because that was one of the very limited ways of getting there that I was aware of. Of course with friends, that would be even better.

    • David

      There were quite a few horrible comments from Chinese netizens but there were also a few kind and thoughtful comments who took the others to task. Obviously these do not represent all Chinese opinions but I will say I have had very few (Chinese) friends talk about what happened in their own backyard. Those of you who speak Chinese, what is the general mood of people you know? Again, I don’t expect that it represents everybody but I am interested in seeing a bigger picture even if I can’t read Chinese.

  • markus peg

    Quote “Ha ha ha! So happy!” – What a moron.

    • Probotector

      One man’s moron is a Chinaman’s patriot.

      • markus peg

        Even if he loves China and Chinese people so much (or in a delusional way), 10,000 dead does not mean they are all Filipino, many Chinese people are their too. Although it should not matter where they are from its still a horrible story regardless.

        • Probotector

          I know. It’s like when the Boston bombing happened, and they were all out cheering, until they found out one of the victims was Chinese.

          • nqk123

            Patriotic Chinese mentality: China vs the world. it’s OK for Chinese to beat Chinese, but not OK for foreigner to beat Chinese. Chinese government is always right. China is the center of the world. Non-Chinese can go fuk themselves. there quite a few more, i just don’t remember.

          • Probotector

            Normally they just laugh at foreigners because they’re afraid of what is different.

      • Riddler

        That is one of the most painful yet truthful comments I have read on this site.

        • Probotector

          You wanna hook up?

          • Riddler

            Yeah man, lets do that.

  • BigBaddWolf

    I’m sure the Party Thugs are gearing up to help the Philippine people by sending some warships over to “protect” Philippine islands

    • YourSupremeCommander

      Good idea.

    • Germandude

      Rule #1

      • YourSupremeCommander

        You should, just lace the food with poison first.

    • Riddler

      With an American fleet stationed over there? Doubt it somehow unless it is a coordinated effort.

    • Probotector

      Has the Tea Party ever committed violence?

  • Probotector

    I love the way CS headlines always say “Chinese netizen reactions”, as if the world waits with bated breath for the Chinese internet community’s approval of the story in hand.

    • Cauffiel

      I love it cause it needlessly defines chinasmack on every article.

    • Jahar

      you mean we don’t?

  • Germandude

    While a bishop in Germany is able to spend 30 million (!) EUR on his new residence in Germany, the church suggests that the German people shall donate money (which they do anyway as always). The church itself didn’t spend any money as of yet. Which is pretty disturbing considering the Church’s activities of convert so many Phillippinos into Christianity… How come that now the church doesn’t have the money (or is not willing to spend it) to the people in need?

    And then, the German foreign minister gives half a million (!) EUR as direct aid to the Phillippines while they just announced a tax surplus (above expectations) of around 17 billion (!) EUR just in last months tax balance. It’s such a disgrace and so shameful. You guys cannot imagine the discussions on German webpages regarding this…’

    I hope, and assume, that the government will quickly stock those donations up. And I really hope that the support is reaching the Phillippines as quickly as possible.

    I hope the people in need are soon receiving all the help possible.

    • Kai

      Maybe the German churches think the responsibility falls on the Spanish churches? It was Spanish missionaries who did most of the whole world-wide Christianity-fest thing, right?

      • Guest23

        Funny and sad thing with the Catholic churches, they pretty much did a lot, Jesuits, Franciscans, and Dominicans did a lot of missionary work.

        Side note that on the Philippine’s earthquake disaster, several of those hundred year churches fell like card houses.

      • Germandude

        The German church is the only church in the world (not sure if Switzerland has one as well) that gets money through taxes. Yes, that’s right. 9% of your income tax is actually church tax.
        Now you are able to leave the church and through that won’t have to pay taxes anymore but that also means you can’t have a wedding at the church anymore (members-only, haha).
        Through all the scandals in the last year, I have decided that the first thing I do when coming back to GER is to register myself in the city I am living and the 2nd move is to leave the church.

        While you are right about German churches not really joining the converting of people to become Christians, one has to understand that the church is a company. Sure, it does good, but still it’s out for profit.

        And in history, the Christian church has comitted numerous crimes in the name of god. Crusades, Inquisition witch-hunts, not to mention their role under the Nazi-regime and the Holocaust.

        Enough reasons for me to be against it.

        • David

          Just remember, you can’t judge a religion by the people who practice it. I hope after you get home you can find a group you feel comfortable with and who make you feel happy in a spiritual way.

          • Germandude

            I am not judging people that believe in god. To each their own. I am criticising ALL religions for playing with people’s fears and making money out of it. Add to that wars etc. and that’s enough for me.

            The only group I feel happy with in a spiritual way is my football club.

            As I said: Everybody should try to find happiness as long as it doesn’t interfere with others in a bad way.

          • David

            Well, my “American Football” team just lost this week, so I am feeling pretty abandoned by God right now.

          • Riddler

            People often complain about organised religion. I think the problems people are facing are somehow connected to DISorganised religion. Just a thought..

          • xiaode

            I think my fellow countryman didn´t judge a faith or religion, but the church – and I guess we mainly talk about the catholic church – who used the name of god for almost 2000 years to committed inexpressible cruelties….

            In my eyes the church has nothing, absolutely nothing to do with to believe in god! … one can completely work without the other!

          • David

            Well, in Germany I guess I already assumed he was talking about the Catholic Church. Raised Catholic I can certainly sympathize with the rude awakening one gets when they learn of some of the things history is full of. But I would say this, it is not really fair to judge the Catholic Church of yesteryear by the standards of today. The people then were doing what they thought was best for their congregants souls. In addition, to all the harm that they did they also gave people who were suffering very low standards of living (compared to today) a reason to live and strive and hope for a better situation in the afterlife. They codified a moral regime that (for good or ill) helped to advance civilization for millennium and the Church was also responsible for the preservation of knowledge through the middle ages (by monks in monasteries). So the Crusades (the successful ones and the ones which went horribly wrong) were certainly responsible for a lot of bloodshed, but so were the Muslim invasions (and the reformation and counter-reformation) not to mention religious institutions like the Mayans and Incas. Now, contemporary problems in the church (sex abuse by priests and the coverups that followed, ostentatious spending of donations that could be used to help the poor, the silence during the holocaust) should certainly be discussed and they should be held accountable for. I am no longer a practicing Catholic myself so I have no reason to praise or absolve the Church for its ‘sins of the past’ but it does still give a great deal of comfort to millions of people on a daily basis and that must count for something. Anyway, best of luck.

          • Germandude

            “But I would say this, it is not really fair to judge the Catholic Church of yesteryear by the standards of today.”

            Hm, okay, let’s see some of the today’s issues with the Catholic Church:

            1. Child sex abuse
            2. Vatican bank scandal
            3. Refusing gay rights
            4. Birth control (especially in Africa and other poor parts of the world) add AIDS to that
            5. Focusing on “traditional” gender roles
            6. Apartheid

            Just to name a few. The church has simply not reached the 21st century yet. Maybe hasn’t even passed the 19th century.
            I am not going into detail and won’t hit on any other religions, which I think are by no means better.

          • David

            I can certainly agree with 1, 2, 5 and 6. 3 and 4 are not going to change as they are against basic tenets of their religion (of course there are plenty of Christian religions who have no problem with being gay). In fairness, they do a lot of charity work for adoptions of unwanted babies around the world (Catholic Charities) and they also do a lot of work for AIDS relief in Africa (just not involving birth control). Like I said, I am not an apologist for the Catholic Church, I just think that those who are interested in reforming it should focus on current problems (like the ones you mention).

          • Germandude

            Ok.

            Point 3: Catholic church. The vatican. I am ONLY referring to them when I am criticising. And truth be told, all those minor churches that we have in Southern Germany, or that you guys have down in the US, are just freeloaders in my eyes that are in there for an easy buck.
            I am not blaming people to believe (alone or in a group). I am blaming those who make money out of it. That includes all religious institutions unfortunately. Including Islam, Buddhism and the freaks that believe in the spaghetti monster.

            Point 4, birth control: The church is against the use of condoms (sigh!). The church is heavily recruiting in Africa and Asia, ESPECIALLY in “young and quickly developing nations”. Now there the church pops up and is against condoms, but to wash their hands clean, supports people on HIV. How cynical is that, especially when considering that the marketing excuse of actually being there is not the converting of people but to fight HIV?

          • David

            For point 3, obviously this is not a new problem for the Church, otherwise there might not have been a reformation (I say might, because the sale of indulgences and other money making schemes were just one of many problems). I suppose it has to do with the inherit weakness of humans. For point 4, The best, realistic way to prevent HIV infection in a social climate like most of rural Africa is a condom. While abstinence would be nice and is what the Church teaches, the incidence of rape, especially as a political tool of terrorism, is so wide spread that abstinence becomes useless. I am not sure it is cynical as much as being consistent in their desire to nurture the soul first and the body next.

          • xiaode

            Sorry, but I do have another opinion! (I am raised catholic as well; we don´t need to discuss this here, would be too much off topic… )

          • David

            Fair enough. Lots of room for friendly discussion in the world.

        • Kai

          Wow, is that so? I didn’t know that. I do know that 9% of one’s taxes isn’t quite a tithe though. ;) I was just about to ask if it made sense to tax everyone for a religious institution but I think you answered me that only members of that church are taxed so that’s fine. So German churches actually use the government tax system in order to get money from its members?

          I agree with you about religion and religious organizations being susceptible to profit motives. I know a lot of people who try to do good with them, but also a lot of people who use them for more questionable ends.

          I think each person needs to figure out their own relationship with their God. Any church should be a resource in the relationship, not an intermediary.

          • Germandude

            I agree with your post, so I will just answer your question:
            The Catholic church received the right to tax in the Weimarer republic in 1919. You know, after WW I, many Germans suffered and didn’t have money, while they were pretty religious. A church tax was supposed to be given to the church which again should use this money to help those in need. The population accepted that more because of religious beliefs and good intentions.
            During the Nazi-regime, those taxes were increased to be split between the church (Hitler feared the church could be his opponent and wanted to appease them) and the Nazis.

            In 1949, through great lobbying efforts, the church made sure that the church tax is written into the German basic law.

        • hess

          “The German church is the only church in the world (not sure if Switzerland has one as well) that gets money through taxes.” Nope.jpg The Swedish church gets its money through taxes as well

          • Germandude

            Well fuck me. I didn’t know that. So thanks, hess. I can finally say that on one thing Germany is as good as Sweden. hehe ;-)

  • DearDairy

    Have you ever been to China and see how they treat their own compatriots?

  • YourSupremeCommander

    My condolences to the Filipino people, hope you can get through with this nightmare!

    On a different note, for a poor south east Asian country, where the people should normally be small and dark, they sure are well fed and looking fat. I have never came across a skinny Filipino, ever!

  • Washington Bullets

    Why would they hate on the Philippines so much? I know that China’s eyeing up a lot of the South China Sea for oil and gas, but I didn’t think that people would be happy about this kind of disaster. Unexpected, but maybe I’m uninformed. People were happy about the earthquakes in Japan, yeah yeah yeah, I “get it”, but a Typhoon ravages an island nation that has never oppressed or trodden on any part of Chinese history, and people are happy???

    • Stefan Xu

      The Philippines claims some Chinese islands to be theirs.

      • Cauffiel

        I think you have that backwards.

      • David

        Considering China has not really been a sailing/exploring country for about 600 years I also think you have that backwards. However, either way it is certainly a source of some tension for the governments but I can’t imagine why Chinese citizens would care and be all upset about some islands they will never see.

        • al in china

          Because they are dumb and don’t know how to get smart!

      • al in china

        They are their’s dummy!

        • Alex Dương

          Nope. Vietnamese.

  • Stefan Xu

    The Philippines – a disgusting shit-hole of a country.

    • Riddler

      That’s a bit rich coming from china.

    • Guang Xiang

      Meanwhile – you are just a shit-hole

    • styx

      and you people eat fetus and you call yourselves civilized..

      • Stefan Xu

        liar, we don’t eat fetus.

        • Cauffiel

          The fuck you don’t. You Guangdong freaks’ll eat toenails if someone tells you it’ll cure your…. whatever awful infection you have.

          • Stefan Xu

            I am not Cantonese, I agree they are barbarians.

          • Cauffiel

            Oh…. then, I take it back. Guangdong is actually a pretty cool place. Where ever you are from sucks.

          • al in china

            Maybe you should take a lot of knives with you and go kill some Cantonese. You guys are good at killing each other!

        • styx

          and kill endangered species to stir up ur sexual appeite and laced toys and milk with shit…Translation: you people are worse than animals…

          • Stefan Xu

            My comment wasn’t really serious, I don’t have anything against PH. It just wanted to see what the reactions were. I wouldn’t mind visiting PH.

            Many Chinese are bad people, but I am an educated one and nice person, I grew up in the west and I get to see both worlds.

            The milk scandal is the past now, it doesn’t happen anymore. Most of the toys made in China are not dangerous. China is developing fast and the bad things of the past hopefully shouldn’t be repeated again. China is a really country, as big as a continent, they will of course be some bad people her and there just like all over the world.

          • al in china

            Oh you are a nice Chinese dog ….I see……hahaha…….seems your face is gone. From the west you say! And I’m sure you speak for all the other Chinese. And you think your China is as big as a continent. Ha what a self centered bunch of bullshit. Listen I’ll give you some Canadian advice. Disassociate yourself from China if you come to visit Canada. Better say to people you are a Filipino as they are well liked in Canada and known around the world as descent people that respect others. We in Canada are sick of the trash from China in our Country to leach off our welfare system. They come, they get the passport, they never get a job, they never give anything back to the Canada, they go back to China to work and pay taxes there,when they get sick then come to Canada for free health care. Useless pack of dogs. Please don’t come to Canada, We don’t want rude ignorant Chinese dogs there.

      • mr.wiener

        @stefanyichengxumattsson:disqus and @robertoplant:disqus.
        Can we stop the tit- for tat BS please?

        • David

          Yes, it just leads to sore tats (not even going to say what it does to your tits)

    • Germandude

      ..

    • David

      I have been to the Philippines and I have found the people to be warm, and friendly. Granted, in the cities they will steal your gold fillings if you are not careful but that can be said of many cities around the world. I was there when Marcos was in charge and then again a few years later under Corazon Aquino. I think you should be more open minded Stefan.

    • al in china

      Guess what you live inside a shit hole…….China. Grow up

      • Stefan Xu

        China is actually much better than the PH in all development indicators. My comment wasn’t really serious, I don’t have anything against PH. It just wanted to see what the reactions were.

    • Stefan Xu

      My comment wasn’t really serious, I don’t have anything against PH. It just wanted to see what the reactions were.

      • Kai

        Please don’t do this. Saying things you don’t mean “just to see the reactions” is the definition of trolling, which is against our comment policy.

        • Stefan Xu

          ok

  • Alphy

    It makes me sick to see people laughing at other’s misfortune. That’s not call patriotism no matter what your political point of view is, that’s just inhumane.

    I don’t know why people think they cannot donate to the rescue/rebuilding effort, I did it pretty easily in China. Here are bunch of organizations that are pretty trust worthy:
    http://world.time.com/2013/11/10/how-to-help-typhoon-victims/

  • nqk123

    I saw so many comments like subhuman, happy day, excellent, etc when referring to Filipino and this tragedy. the odd thing is that it’s posted by traditional American names, (ie. John, Robert, Joe). I don’t think American people are like that, especially they themselves went through the sandy storm. from numerous sites

    • David

      I would say that for the most part, Filipinos are thought of very well in the U.S. (ok, maybe not 100 years ago in California) but today certainly. I have several immigrant and first generation Filipino/American friends.

    • al in china

      Chinese think western people are too dumb to learn their Chinese names. So they all gave themselves English names.

  • vonskippy

    “Chinese people have been hailed as a land of etiquette and manners since ancient times”

    Bwaahahahahahahaha – keep drinking that Government sponsored Koolaid.

    No one in the world thinks that.

  • Kochigachi

    Chiti chiti fang feng, typhoooong

  • Riddler

    Examples please?

  • al in china

    I guess the Chinese are just too scared to take them back. haha! They only kill each other,haha!

  • al in china

    “Sweetheart, we Chinese people are not good and simple minded, great-hearted, naive people like you.” wow you get a fucking life. Be better, fix your country, the whole fucking would is laughing. come on come and get us…….chicken shit for brains Chinese dog eaters!

  • Kai

    We just published a translation from Sina with a lot of obnoxious comments. I haven’t started looking through the pending queue but I’ll get to it soon. You should verify your email address if you don’t want to wait for your comments to be manually approved.

  • linette lee

    I was reading the hk news. The US navy ship docked at HK will be going over to help Philippine. I am glad US is sending out big ships. The US soldiers and their ship can carry tons of supplies and aid. I want to see USA use their soldiers like this. Not the way they use them in middle east.

    • David

      Well, I will say that having been in the military and been part of relief efforts and having been in war, all the military people prefer the relief efforts also (less chance of getting blown up).

  • nqk123

    Good point. however, i don’t see an overwhelming support for that type of comments.

  • Riddler

    You really are quivering in oblivious intoxicated ignorance.

  • Riddler

    Can you imagine them trying to pull this shit in London or New York? I mean just imagine what would happen…..

    That kid, they have no idea what this kid will be planning everyday till he grows in strength. Then? They will be wondering how what and why it happened.

  • Phil Ossiferz Stone

    Jesus. A lot of these people sound like lefties talking about the Tea Party.

  • Germandude

    I am sorry about not being precise enough. I meant the Christian church. I am pretty sure that the only catholic church that is allowed to claim a church tax. Still not sure about Switzerland as I am too lazy to look it up.

    If the Lutheran church taxes in Finland, I think that’s as wrong as the situation in Germany. Religion should be a free choice and not forced or supported by a government.

    • David

      I will give you an ‘Amen’ for that.

    • hess

      lutheran = christian

      • Germandude

        I know. I meant to write catholic church. I actually made that mistake more than once in this thread.
        Shame on me. I am only refering to the catholic church.

  • lasolitaria

    WTF? Seriously, dude?
    Your comment anally raped reality, common sense, logic and everything we know about human anatomy and physiology. If only I could electro-shock out of my head every memory of ever reading it…

  • Probotector

    But what of a person with no “Chinese blood”? Are you implying you’ll have no sympathy for them?

  • Probotector

    But then, what China wants is mastery of all Asia/ the Pacific and servitude of all Asian nations to China. How is China any different to America then?

    • David

      The last time I looked America won a few wars and then helped those people get back on their feet, not take over their country. I don’t think we colonized Japan, Germany, Italy, Korea, Iraq or Afghanistan (and were not attempting to colonize Vietnam). If we just wanted to destroy their army, conquer them and take over it would have been much simpler for us (We beat the Iraqi military in a few weeks). So lets be fair about saying America is trying to take over the world (we have not even had a real territorial dispute with Canada since the middle of the 19th century). lol

      • Probotector

        Well, I meant how is China any different to America, insofar as his logic dictates.

        • David

          Yea, actually I got that. Sorry for the over reaction. : )

  • David

    The real problem is that about 1 billion of those anti-Chinese sentiments belong to Chinese. : ) (j/k kinda)

  • David

    Well, people will be people. I suppose the need somebody to hate.

  • David

    I have a map here that shows were my great (x20) ancestor once picked a flower in Fiji, so I think I need to claim the islands as my own. Everybody in Fiji has to move.

  • David

    Well, I am sure you know a lot of people who do NOT feel this way, so keep that in mind and pray for those who are suffering (and a donation to a charity you trust would be good too lol).

  • David

    You forgot the plague! OK, lets be a little fair and say this does not represent everybody. I only see one or two people pee/poo in the street each week while hundreds go home and do that. Also, all my Chinese friends are disgusted and horrified when they see this.

  • iLL

    It is fucked up how these young people thing. They forget not to long ago, China was a country like this, how poor they were, not like it is today. The young really never learned about the past struggles some people in China had. These people who wish this onto other. Its fucked up how people let invisible lines determine how you treat another human being, how this invisible line determines one level person worth compared to another persons worth. fucked up i tell ya, how we are really all team human.

    • dollyrama

      You should see the anti-China sites started by Pinoys, much more vitriol than the other way around. You have extremist views in any case.

      • iLL

        my view is extremist..How i believe all humans should help each other. How people should not put country ahead of humanity…ok if you believe that its fine. I just believe in humanity.
        These invisible lines determine how one person thinks or acts to another person is extremist. It is alright if you feel that.
        As for the anti China websites, i am sure there are many started by trolls. As a human and someone in a better position then someone. We should help the people in need. Look at China and all the anti Japanese websites. Still in 2008 Chengdu earthquake Japan donated over 9 million USD to that relief effort. They looked passed those tensions and helped with the relief effort. I understand government stance and the problems and disputes that China has with the PI, but we should always care for the innocent who are caught up in the horrible situation which is out of there control. If this view is extremist in your eyes, then i am extremist in your eyes and nothing i can say would change that. I would just hope majority of the people in the world do not have that same view as you.

        • dollyrama

          Actually, I meant both sides have extremist views, not you.

  • Germandude

    Ah boy. Once you get laid, you will view the world from another ancle.

  • Nessquick Choco

    wtf ? I want cry for comments like this :(

  • Duh

    How much did the Philippines donate to China during the 2008 earthquake?

  • Eric Xin

    China sent Japan 167K the first week Japan had the 2011 Earthquake. It eventually exploded into 9.2 million.

    Are you telling me China hate Philippines more than China hate Japan? Or maybe you spike the guns before China could get its own damage report on its own Haiyan damage? (Which is north of 700 USD million last counted)

    • Germandude

      Sichuan earthquake: Japan sent China 9.6 mio USD

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reactions_to_the_2008_Sichuan_earthquake

      Not that I think comparisons are necessary but you sound butthurt.

      • dollyrama

        It is idiotic at best to use China’s donation to the Philippines as a bashing tool. The 100K donated so far came from the Red Cross, as I am sure other donations from China will come in.

        • Germandude

          I didn’t?! I replied to Eric Xin who was bragging about Chinese donations to the Japanese earthquake in 2011. Which is around the same as Japan donated to China during the Sichuan earthquake.

          Please explain to me where I am bashing?

  • Joel M. Atienza

    • Don’t say, “The Philippines deserves the privilege of experiencing a strong typhoon because they’re a strong nation.” How would you feel if someone said, “Your family deserves the privilege of experiencing tragedy because you are a strong bunch”? Yeah, I thought so. Don’t say people in the Visayas region deserve it. It is not your place to judge whether or not a community deserves a projected death toll of 10,000, including innocent children. That is, unless you think you can read God’s mind.

  • Joel M. Atienza

    “Don’t say that these people deserve it. It is not your place to judge whether or not a community deserves a projected death toll of 10,000, including innocent children. That is, unless you think you can read God’s mind.• Don’t say, “The Philippines deserves the privilege of experiencing a strong typhoon because they’re a strong nation.” How would you feel if someone said, “Your family deserves the privilege of experiencing tragedy because you are a strong bunch”? Yeah, I thought so” – Stef Dela Cruz. These people are human beings and not dogs. If some of you consider them dogs, then you are rabid dogs, rabies went to your heads making you think you are superior than these people. If you don’t have anything to say then just shut up your mouths or the law of karma will hit you in the end.

  • Ralphrepo

    From the New York Times of 12 NOV 2013:

    “The United Nations has called for more than $300 million in aid, and
    many reliable past donors — the United States ($20 million), Japan ($10
    million), Australia ($9.3 million), Britain ($16 million) — are again
    proving generous. One exception is China, the world’s second-largest
    economy after the United States. China is at odds with the Philippines
    over claims to the South China Sea and has offered a paltry $200,000…”

    The old adage of action speaking louder than words certainly applies here. I recall reading many previous Chinese commentary about how other countries, despite having contributed millions, “failed” to step up to offer assistance to China during the various earthquakes. Then of course, one sees this remarkable Chinese effort.

    But why so generous? Why didn’t the PRC offer just a dollar instead? That would REALLY send a message about who and what China is, eh? The PRC government wants face so badly but it continually cuts its own nose off. As someone who is Chinese, this is such an embarrassment.

  • dollyrama

    Actually many did cheered when China had disasters, such as Sharon Stone and on many foreign forums, like yahoo etc. Even Filipinos on the I Hate China Facebook Page cheered the deaths of a few during a typhoon hit on China just this year.

  • dollyrama

    A lot of the donations from the Philippines for relief efforts in China came from Sino-Filipinos, with many still having strong links to their ancestral land.

  • dollyrama

    Yes, so was Marcos, Emilio Aguinaldo, Jose Rizal and a whole bunch of them.

  • dollyrama

    China might claim a few islands, but America has caused more death in Asia post WW2:

    1. Vietnam: Over 1 million killed.
    2. Pakistan: Thousands killed by drone attacks.
    3. Iraq: About 100-200K died as a consequence of American sanctions and invasions.
    4. Over 1 million Indonesians slaughtered in 1965, after a CIA backed coup.
    5. More bombs were dropped on Cambodia and Laos by America, than the entire tonnage dropped in the entire WW2.
    6. Overthrowing the democratic government of Mossadegh’s Iran.
    7. Supporting dictators like Suharto, Marcos, Shah of Iran, King of Saudi Arabia, Saddam Hussein (at 1 time), Bhutto et al!

    • mr.wiener

      FFS can we please stop throwing around atrocity stats like they are casino chips !?!
      @d2c8805b108614877fbfc58a8e1400e6:disqus you do this all the time and it is getting reeeealy old
      @dollyrama:disqus don’t feed the troll.

  • SimpsonsGoldenAge

    I’ve also got back to the UK and don’t plan on living in China ever again. This shit is just too much to handle.

  • Guest92

    No.

  • Yrrej Ial

    真的吗,你试试看。什么东西。

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