Chang’e 3 and ‘Jade Rabbit’ Rover Lands on Moon, Reactions

China's Yu Tu aka Jade Rabbit lunar rover.

The following #hashtag# on China’s leading microblogging platform Sina Weibo claims over 3.6m discussions…

From Sina Weibo:

#Chang’e 3 Moon Landing#

Upon the decision of launch command, the “Chang’e 3” probe was launched at 1:30am on December 2nd from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center “Chang’e 3” carries the “Yutu” [or “Jade Rabbit”] moon rover and will perform a soft landing on the Moon and explore the lunar surface for the first time, as well as carry out scientific exploration of lunar topology and geological structure and so on. “Chang’e 3”, jia you!

From Sina Weibo:

@央视新闻 [CCTV News]: #Chang’e 3 Moon Landing# Flight to Moon Succeeds! geili — China becomes the third country after the United States and Soviet Union to accomplish a soft landing on the Moon! “Yutu” will gallop on the Moon! Mighty China! geilivw

the lander

Comments from Sina Weibo:

涣然冰释2000:

At that moment, my eyes were filled with tears, proud of our homeland, proud of being Chinese!

许雅妮:

Seeing everyone’s comments, I want to say we should no longer discuss or even call into question whether or not the country spending money persisting in space exploration is worth it or not. To explore, is the innate ability of humanity. Without such abilities, I bet we would still be cavemen right now. So, were it not for our ancestors’ exploration, we wouldn’t be where we are today; what we do today is also paving the road for our descendents. I suddenly feel like my consciousness is really high today, am I right?! [偷笑][偷笑][偷笑]

了时了了:

The starry sky is too beautiful that I couldn’t bear to blink. Salute to all the unknown, salute to the people on the road of exploration. Surefooted career doesn’t allow the least bit of exaggeration, careless and self-deception. Let us encourage each other. (As an old military man who grew up alongside the nation, my grandpa reminisced for a long time when as he watched on live TV: China, incredible! I think this is the truest patriotic feeling. I hope our nation will accomplish even more inspiring national dreams.)

白色恋歌的围脖:

Throws flower pedals. So niu! Hahaha.

布布gg:

Made in China [good]

本泽锅:

Faster, farther, humanity must not be forever confined in this area of space.

路l人r甲j:

Hurry and put up a picture of the national flag.

952100kj:

geili

From Phoenix Online:

Jade Rabbit Lands on the Lunar Surface, All Six Wheels On The Ground

Original title: “Chang’e 3” Lander and Rover Successfully Separated This Morning

China News December 15th report —- According to CCTV reports, at 4:35am this morning, the “Chang’e 3” lander and rover successfully separated, with “Yutu” [or Jade Rabbit] rolling onto the moon surface.

CCTV information says the rover landed slowly after touching down on the lunar surface left a deep trace [on the lunar soil]. The data collected will be promptly transmitted to the Earth.

After the separation, the rover and lander will start their own scientific explorations, and have the experiment of photographing each other.

Jade Rabbit touched down the lunar surface

Jade Rabbit just after landing on the lunar surface, all six-wheels on the ground.

Jade Rabbit rolls to moon surface

Jade Rabbit on the lunar surface having traveled a distance.

Comments from Phoenix Online:

凤凰网湖北省武汉市网友:手机用户

As long as we are given the opportunity, China’s innovation is as great as [developed countries]. Our countrymen should have self-confidence.

凤凰网北京市网友:手机用户

On TV, that most of the [China] Aerospace personnel are young people makes Chinese people even more gratified and self-confident [in the future of China].

凤凰网中国网友:手机用户

All imperialism are paper tigers. A strong China, a strong Chinese people, I thank the hardworking people behind the screen. I as an ordinary common person extremely thank you all.

凤凰网未知IP网友:手机用户

Our countrymen have truly realized [the dream] Chairman Mao said: To grasp the moon in the Ninth Heaven and seize turtles deep in the Five Seas. This is worth cheering! I love you, China!

凤凰网北京市网友:手机用户

Strengthen our national power.

凤凰网山东省菏泽市网友:桂英挂帅

After the cheering, may the government officials please not forget to increase the salary of the scientific and technical staff!!

凤凰网湖北省随州市网友:手机用户

Great China. I’m proud of the Chinese nation.

凤凰网中国网友:手机用户

May our motherland be more powerful!

凤凰网北京市网友:手机用户

Well done, China Aerospace.

China's Chang'e 3 Lunar Probe and Lander.

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  • Middle_Kingdum

    Ancient maps discovered under my SOFA clearly show that the moon has been the territory of China since the earliest millenia.

    • SonofSpermcube

      Parts of China lie within the region where the moon will pass directly overhead; so its claim is current and has been continuous.

      • Joey

        The Chinese have used a lunar calendar for over 5000 years, this means that surely the moon is Chinese territory.

        • Ivan Teo

          So the sun is China’s too since the Chinese use light million of years ago? Stop being greedy, China.

    • Zappa Frank

      do not joke too much about that, seems their exploration was about looking for elio-3 and a use of the moon for mining. Obviously no one can according to the Moon Agreement of ’79…
      In while I do not understand what’s to be proud since ESA and NASA send robots on Mars..and china is just doing what was done already more than 50years ago..By the way, no Chinese man on the moon..

      • Kai

        If you can be proud of doing something that others have already done years ago, like graduate from college, the Chinese can be proud of doing something that only two other countries have done before 50 years ago. Sending something to the moon isn’t easy and it takes a lot of resources, work, and will. To accomplish something difficult is sometimes its own reward. Let them be happy and shoot them down for stuff they have no reasonable reason to be proud of.

        • nqk123

          reasonable enough. no bashing on this event people

    • mr.wiener

      There was some tit in China selling real estate on the moon a few years ago i think.

      • the ace of books

        “And from this window you get a grand view of … well, everything, really.”

        • Cauffiel

          Half of everything.

          • the ace of books

            Always only half. What kind of a damn view is this? I want my money back!

          • Cauffiel

            Its a rip off, dude.

      • Germandude

        I am the owner of a star somewhere out there. At least that’s what this document shows me that my friend gave me as a wedding present.
        Luckily my wife really likes it.

      • moeimoei

        yea, and some dick bought it…

    • nqk123

      US will challenge that. They have more concrete evident suggesting the moon is their. US flags are still there.

    • Cauffiel

      They saw that shit before anywhere else. While the rest of the world was cloudy in antiquity, China was mighty! and clear!

    • aivbwbjnwjk

      If the Chinese rover does not discover an American flag, then technically speaking the moon is Terra Nullius, thus the Chinese should claim it.

  • What no selfies?

    • TJDubs

      It did litter and write its name on the moon’s surface, though.

  • mr.wiener

    Credit where credit is due, overly nationalist fools comments notwithstanding. Congrats to China. Lets work together for the future of mankind.

    • the ace of books

      Hell yeah.

    • Kai

      I suspect many of the top comments on Phoenix Online are astroturfed, meaning they were mass posted and voted up dishonestly through scripts and therefore not representing actual separate individuals.

      But don’t get me wrong, there’s enough legit comment and public sentiment out there that a lot of Chinese people are indeed proud of the achievement. Not quite like Americans with the much more impressive manned Moon landing but in a “we can do it too and that’s reassuring” sort of way.

    • Dr Sun

      I believe the USA stuck it’s flag there first, after spending billions of $ and losing mens lives,in the naive belief that it made them look cool, that there was oil, precious metals or the next las Vegas, there, but eventually gave it up as a waste of time, too expensive, just to find out it was not made of cheese. :)

  • mr.wiener

    Ah shore do liake me some O’ them sour grapes.

  • Wangandbang

    Congratulations!!!

  • Wangandbang

    Clearly you did not see the documents from the Wang Dynasty that clearly support China’s sovereignty over the region and our existing lunar Space Defense Zone. You 8 Imperialist armies will not hurt the feelings of the Chinese people and the U.S. and A must return all lunar rock relics back to China immediately!

  • Wangandbang

    Is it me or is the moon look more brown there as opposed the white in earlier pictures? Is that just because they were black and white photos before or that the pictures were taken with a Xiaomi phone? Wagabang!!!

  • the ace of books

    Nice! A little disappointed that I didn’t know this was happening – I could’ve watched or something! – but exciting nonetheless! I don’t care about nationalism, or which nation does it, I’m just excited humans are going back to the moon again! 加油, HUMANITY. MAKE SCIENCE FICTION HAPPEN.

    • Kai

      Seriously! I was promised interstellar space travel and off-world colonization with aliens and shit when I was a kid. How much longer do I have to wait? I’m running out of time here!

      • the ace of books

        I would be absolutely delighted if we could get real eyeball-views of other planets with biological stuff on them. Doesn’t have to be big and fancy, but something multicellular and with species variety would be super cool to see.

        If we manage that in the next seventy years, I’ll be happy with that – I know travel’d take a hella lot more teach and ability than we have now, and don’t expect it in my lifetime, but just a glimpse would be enough.

    • Mony Xie

      I constantly worry about that we will fail to invent something that can carry us out of the solar system and find another when the sun dies. I think we should devote all our resource to science and technology. Am I too paranoid?

      • the ace of books

        To answer your questions: probably.

        1) The sun’s got at least another 5 million years before we need to start worrying – and if you plan to be around 5 million years from now, you have far longer-term plans than I do.

        2) There’s hundreds of life-supporting-available planets out there, so it’s notsomuch a matter of finding as it is getting out there.

        3) The biggest problem is not leaving the solar system – that’s no big. It’s getting those thirty or forty light-years to other stars and star systems that’s the hard part.

        Note I’m being pretty tongue-in-cheek, so don’t get mad at any of this. But science’s priorities do need to be spread out – getting off-planet is important and worthy, yes, but so is a lot of other current research and tech going on, and those shouldn’t be put aside just to focus single-mindedly on one thing.

        • mopedchi

          1) I’m pretty sure it’s 5 billion year until Sol become a red giant so we have plenty of time.

          I agree with 2) & 3) though there are stars closer than 30 light years but they’re all currently out of reach.

          I work for a company that’s trying to send colonists to Mars. One step at a time…

          • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

            That wouldn’t be part of the Mars One project is it?

          • mopedchi

            Nope… SpaceX. I don’t understand the Mars One business model, other than collecting “application” fees. I put their chance of an unmanned mission to Mars on a Falcon Heavy in 2018 at 0.0%.

          • the ace of books

            1) you’re right, I typed it wrong. I know how long it is, don’t know why I put an M instead of a B. must’ve been tired (wrote that reply at Ass O’clock in the AM).

            3) picked 30/40 arbitrarily. Really, once you start talking about the interstellar neighborhood, everything’s prettty far. Maybe quantum will help us?

          • Cauffiel

            Sun’s got 5 billion years left, but Earth will be unlivable in a period of years measured by millions. The Sun will undergo changes that will make it brighter and hotter.

            But still, enormous amounts of time left. ;-)

      • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

        Let me put it this way. Between 1600 to 2000, we went from boats that went barely a mile a minute to rockets that could carry equipment and robots to mars. That was our advancement in the last 400 years of our 10k+ history. I think we’re going pretty fast.

        • hailexiao

          A mile a minute is 60 miles per hour. I’m pretty sure no one was going 60 mph in 1600 unless some Chinese guy built a gunpowder rocket sled.

          • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

            Meant to put ‘hour’.

  • Kai

    I smell a moon landing hoax conspiracy theorist…

    • mr.wiener

      Please watch, best and most objective thing I’ve heard on the subject:

    • the ace of books

      The horrified cringe that I experience every time I hear someone earnestly defending the “the moon landing was faked” conspiracy is sort of like a spasm – an uncontrollable, overall feeling of FUCK NO GET THE STUPID AWAY FROM ME

  • marksman

    congratulation, historic landing on the moon it’s triumph for china

  • Stefan Xu

    Are they going to claim the large cheese reserves?

    • Kai

      I hope so, then maybe cheese will be cheaper and easier to find in China.

      Unfortunately, I think I’m starting to become lactose intolerant as I get older…

      • Cauffiel

        It would be nice if more Chinese understood cheese is not limited to that dogshit they put on your pizza at Pizza Hut.

        • Nick in Beijing

          And didn’t charge ridiculous prices for decent cheese in the rip-off import markets.

          • Cauffiel

            I don’t really care about that, I just don’t like that my native food is so repulsive to them because we only export our shittiest food. Fucking Pizza Hut and McDonalds and KFC.

            But I guess even good quality American food would probably not fit the majority of Chinese’s palate.

          • ex-expat

            Actually those foods sell well in China, but you are right that it wouldn’t matter regardless. Stories of tourists eating 方便面 in hotel rooms are heard the world over, not just the US, so it’s certainly a Western/Chinese thing as opposed to a Chinese/American thing. I think part of it is ignorance, part of it is cultural hubris, and part is just plain close-mindedness. I remember being in Wuhan, and a woman that was next to me looked over and said “good thing we are in China, your people only eat hamburgers.” Though I wanted to make her choke on her 牛肉面,I suppose I could take solace in the fact that she will be stuck in that shithole city eating gutter oil dog shit for the rest of her life.

  • Germandude

    Considering the exaggerated opinion of oneself of German leaders, I think it’s fair to say that the moon belongs as much to Germany as much as Germany ends at the Volga river.

    Consider your sources incorrect.

  • vonskippy

    If you look up at the moon and squint a bit, you can practically see the diesel exhaust fumes coming from the Chinese rover.

    Just kidding, good job China. You stole most of the IP from the west, bought most of the tech and engineering from Russia, and educated all of your Scientists and Engineers in the States or UK, but by golly, it’s still rocket science, and you guys did it – Good Job.

    • Jobjed

      Actually, multi-stage rocketry was a Chinese invention; the world should be paying China several centuries worth of royalties for their unauthorised use. So, think of current Chinese practices as getting even with the rest of the world for “stealing” Chinese inventions and refusing to pay royalties.

      • Zappa Frank

        funny… wait… are you serious? because it would make it even more funny.

        • Jobjed

          Depends on what you mean by ‘serious’. I don’t care about alleged Chinese violations of ‘IP’ rights. The way I see it, the West got to where it is today through taking stuff from around the world by force, it’s more than justifiable for China to take stuff around the world by ‘theft’; kills a lot less people than using force too.

          • Irvin

            I myself never liked the so called copy rights, it’s a definite way of limiting innovation, at least the way it is in america.

            People there just think of half ass ideas then patent it and sit their ass on it, sponging off people that actually seek to make the stuff works.

            Imagine if the wheel was first invented with the current ip laws, some idiot thought of a square wheel then patent it and sit on it. The someone went and make the actual wheels that we know today but got sued by the idiot with the square wheel idea.

            copyright laws my ass! All inventions should be free for all humanity to use and improved upon.

          • Cauffiel

            That is an extremely bad idea. Believe me, no one will copy it.

      • ReddSept .

        actually the Germans invented the the first real 2 stage rocket…it was called the V-2

  • FYIADragoon

    And naturally, whereas the American confirmation of the landing shared the achievement as something for all mankind……China’s still thinking me me me as usual haha.

    • Mony Xie

      Is that funny?

      • FYIADragoon

        I’ve been dealing with them long enough that I can only laugh at their shortcomings now.

        • Jobjed

          Classic case of schadenfreude douchebaggery.

          • Alex Dương

            FYIADragoon is the only China basher honest enough to admit that he “works for a group that actively benefits from it.”

        • YourSupremeCommander

          Says the reject.

  • Damn a lot of nationlism in those comments. A great success for sure and worthy of being proud. But why is it always linked to phrases like “Strong China” and China in general?

    • Cauffiel

      Because they have nothing else to lean on.

      • Nick in Beijing

        Because they seek anything that can be compared with anything in the West looking for justification of their grandiose self-image.

  • YourSupremeCommander

    Nice work but please please change these god damn AWFUL & CORNY as hell names!

  • plorf

    You know, all nationalism and chest-thumbing aside, it’s actually pretty cool to see that thing on the moon. Well done I say.

    • Nick in Beijing

      I certainly thought it was cool when I saw it. It was a bit of a downer when it was that I heard it from a student, who only said it as a way of trying to prove how great China is.

      He got offended at the idea of calling it a human achievement, rather than a national achievement.

  • lasolitaria

    WAIT!!! The shadows are misplaced…

  • MeCampbell30

    Well done China! To infinity and beyond!

    Only good things can come from a rigorous and well funded space program. Both technologically and socially.

  • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

    So they reenacted 2 and a half hours worth of oxygen just for the sake of a show, in an operation that was all calculated with pen and paper…yeah and Winston Churchill was never real.

  • KamikaziPilot

    Well better late than never. But really congrats to China for this accomplishment as it is a big accomplishment, if anything to create further interest in science and exploration for the Chinese people. I’m curious to know how many countries have the capability to do what China just did but for some reason or another haven’t done so yet?

    • Cauffiel

      Nevermind the fact 180,000 people were moved from their homes to launch this thing from Sichuan.

      • KamikaziPilot

        They were? Wonder why they couldn’t build a launch pad somewhere in the countryside without any people nearby.

        • Nick in Beijing

          Assuming that is true, I am not sure the Chinese government is terribly interested in that aspect of managing society.

          What does the opinion of close to 200k of it’s citizens mean to them when they are talking about gaining face for the nation?

          • KamikaziPilot

            Yeah but I think those 180,000 were only evacuated from their homes temporarily, not permanently. I don’t see much of a problem with this. I mean I know the government puts the launch priorities first but it isn’t like the 180,000 people were displaced and forced to move.

          • Nick in Beijing

            No you’re right, totally.

            I am only saying that they likely won’t move launch locations because things like relocating people (even temporarily) out of the launch path probably aren’t something that they worry about getting backlash from.

            Then again, this is all speculation being as I haven’t actually read anything on the issue.

          • KamikaziPilot

            Okay I get it. I just don’t know why Cauffiel had to bring up the 180,000 people being temporarily evacuated from their homes. I know it’s an inconvenience but unless I’m missing something else, it doesn’t seem so bad. I hope the government gave them a place to stay during their evacuation. And also they need to buy insurance to cover any losses, like the Americans and Europeans.

          • Cauffiel

            If you don’t understand why forcing 180,000 people to get out of town is wrong, I’m not sure I can explain it to you. If you ever get booted out of your house, though, I think you’ll get the idea.

          • KamikaziPilot

            Well it seems logical that the government would tell the people to evacuate for a day at most and then be allowed to return. Isn’t that what happens? If the government provides temporary accommodations it’s an inconvenience but not a huge problem. Get what I’m saying? Anyways, yes it’s a negative part of the launch but I still think it’s a major accomplishment for China.

        • Cauffiel

          Yes, in fact, some houses were hit when the rockets dropped the boosters, the solution for which was (as suggested by authorities) to set up an insurance plan for people who live in launch paths, i.e., there is no plan to shift to a more transparent aerospace program. Read http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/363314

          • KamikaziPilot

            So the issue is that China should have an insurance policy to cover losses from launches like in the US and Europe right? I think falling debris can happen everywhere so can’t really blame China for this. I want to see how the frequency of falling debris compares to other countries’ launches. If other countries also have this problem, I can’t really single out China. I think those 180,000 were only evacuated for the launch and then allowed to go back to their homes so it isn’t too bad, even thought that one poor guy was at home when a piece crash through his roof. He must have shit his pants.

          • Cauffiel

            All multi-stage rockets have falling debris. To avoid injury or property damage, most countries launch over the ocean. But China wants to keep its 40 year old technology shrouded from the prying eyes of other country’s observation ships (hallmark of a country up to no good). So falling debris does not happen “everywhere.” It happens in an area predetermined by aerospace engineers.

            Check this out (best part is around 2:20!): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvSRnOJ8x38

        • Cauffiel

          The launch area is intentionally built inland, like the Russians did a generation ago, to hide the development of their technology from obnoxious observation ships of multiple countries in the ocean.

          As I read, a launch site is being constructed in Hainan, but it is designed only for certain spacecraft, all unmanned.

    • Nick in Beijing

      I had a similar thought.

  • Free Man

    I wonder how long until it takes until they claim the moon as chinese territory …

  • Foreign Devil

    coming soon: territorial claims and disputes on lunar land.

    • Cauffiel

      Hey…. Japan was there first, man.

  • anon101

    Its nice to see China doing something thats new and not copied from anywhere. Also I hear there is a big problem with it, If you look under the wheel it says “Made In China”.

  • Nick in Beijing

    If China focused on being a scientific power, instead of an economic bully and attempting to become a military power, I would be proud to be living in China.

    Scientific pioneers are what we as a race should be. Abandon national considerations when talking about science and instead adopt a species-wide gaze into the future.

    If China can get over it’s simplistic national agenda in it’s scientific endeavors and begins progressing as a place that makes progress in science for the sake of scientific progress, then China could find itself in a position to become a soft power that people around the world will look to for guidance. As it currently is, the world can only view China’s developments and forward steps with suspicion.

    • Alex Dương

      An implication from your comment is that you aren’t proud of living in China. Then why have you been there since March 2008? Is it because you aren’t entrepreneurial enough to make it in the U.S. and thus the only way you could make a living was to move to a “frontier”-ish developing country like China?

      • Nick in Beijing

        I know you are on some kind of crusade against me. Why I continue to live in China really isn’t any of your business, is it? In the few posts we have exchanged i have the impression you are very binary thinker. Never any subtleties or nuanced reasoning for things.

        I am bored with you.

        • Alex Dương

          Of course it’s none of my business. I just find it hilarious that expats like you hate your adopted country so much, yet you can’t leave because you aren’t skilled enough to find employment or creative enough to employ yourself back home.

          As for “nuance,” Nick, there’s nothing nuanced about selectively reading comments that fit your prejudices. In fact, that’s the very opposite of nuance.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Take a few moments to apply your uncreative thought process to life and discover that there is more to living than economic prospects. You don’t know me, so I am not bothered by your biased accusations. When you can drop your silly preconceptions about expats, then maybe you will say something worth giving a more thoughtful reply to.

            Just because I am not proud of China, doesn’t mean I am not happy with my life here.

            Besides, whoever said China is my adopted country? Talk about presumptuous.

          • Alex Dương

            Is your selective reading of comments just a manifestation of your overall poor reading ability? I said “expats like you,” not “expats.” I’m sure there are many expats in China, who while critical of the country’s policies, don’t make blanket statements about how Chinese people are frighteningly jingoist.

            I could buy your “more to living than economic prospects” thing if the comments you posted here made it seem like you actually enjoy living in China. As is, your posts give the impression that you think you’re better than the people you live amongst, and you think the country sucks, but you can’t leave because you cannot make a living outside of China.

          • Nick in Beijing

            We are posting on a website called ChinaSMACK, responding to largely negative stories about China and Chinese society and culture… please take just a few moments to consider these kinds of things before making blind stabs to try to inflame strangers on the internet. You will make yourself look less stupid. Keep this in mind the next time you call someone out for being selective in the way they respond to postings.

          • Alex Dương

            And…thank you for continuing to demonstrate your poor reading comprehension skills. This web site’s “about” link describes itself as “provid[ing] non-Chinese language readers a glimpse into modern China and
            Chinese society by translating popular and trending Chinese internet content and netizen discussions…”

            No where does this web site say that its purpose is “responding to largely negative stories about China and Chinese society and culture.” Do negative stories tend to attract discussion and thus be “popular and trending”? Sure. Is every translated story in chinaSMACK about a negative event? Uh, no.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Fact is, most of the stories are negative, so they will draw negative remarks.

            I know you are getting some kind of hate-boner for me and are trying to bate me, but if your only argument is that I don’t read your posts and can’t make a living abroad, then you really are thick.

            Buh buh now.

          • Alex Dương

            Oh, it’s not my posts, although you certainly don’t read them carefully since I acknowledged that negative stories tend to be popular and trending. No, it’s that you selectively read comments, ignoring the ones that don’t fit your preconceived prejudices, and call such behavior “nuance.” You don’t know what that word means.

            And I didn’t say you can’t make a living abroad. I said you can’t make a living back home; only by going abroad to China can you survive economically. That will forever be the irony here.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Say whatever makes you happy. If your world view is as limited as what you express to me (people only leave the U.S. who can’t make a living there, people who respond to things that interest them but things that don’t lack nuance, if someone doesn’t agree with you or respond to your posts in their entirety then they are selective etc. etc.), then your need to attack strangers online is understandable. Something about a void needing to be filled comes to mind.

          • Alex Dương

            Is every expat in China like you? No. By your own admission, you’re a high school dropout. High school curricula nationwide have weakened to where a high school diploma isn’t a standard of competence anymore. You don’t even have that, so the only way you could make a living in the U.S. would be through self-employment.

            You really don’t know what “nuance” means. Being nuanced means being able to appreciate subtleties. An implication is that you can see the whole picture. You have proven repeatedly that you can’t do that. It’s not about “responding to things that interest you”; it’s about recognizing that not every translated comment fits your prejudice about the Chinese being Nazi jingoists. Really, you don’t have to be nuanced to recognize that; you just need to not be an idiot.

          • Nick in Beijing

            So you read my Disqus profile. I suppose you also read about my other educational experience. And you accuse me of being selective? You are certainly a hypocrite, as well as desperate for the attention that controversy ought to bring you.

          • Alex Dương

            Yes, I did. What of it? It doesn’t seem relevant at all since you apparently work as a teacher in China and not for any IT firm.

            I’m surprised that it took you this long to realize that I clicked your name once, seeing as how my first reply to you here asked you why you’ve been living in China since March 2008 when you obviously think the country sucks. That’s not a unjustified opinion, but the real anger here is that you are pretty much forced to live in such a country because you can’t cut it back home.

          • Nick in Beijing

            I don’t care if you clicked my name and read my profile. I wrote it up there, so why should i be bothered by someone reading it? And besides, people often work outside the field they majored in.

            You are grasping at straws.

          • Alex Dương

            That mostly applies to people who majored in liberal arts subjects, not technical or trade subjects, which is what you studied.

          • Nick in Beijing

            So?

          • Alex Dương

            So that comment is mostly irrelevant to you.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Are you trying to imply that people who work outside their area of study are failures?

          • Alex Dương

            No. I’m telling you that comparing yourself to an English major who subsequently studied law, for example, is not appropriate. People who major in trade subjects at technical colleges usually work in areas where skills taught in those trade subjects are in demand.

            If that wasn’t your case, that doesn’t make you a failure. You are employed; you aren’t a deadbeat. Your problem, from my perspective, is that you hate that you have to live in a country you hate just to earn a living.

          • Nick in Beijing

            I hate a lot about China. I hated a lot about Japan, and I hated a lot about the U.S., if you can’t see past criticism then that is your own fault, I don’t remember every saying I was unhappy with my life in China.

          • Alex Dương

            So you’re not proud to live in China, but neither are you “unhappy.” Um, OK.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Are the two dependent upon each other? If your happiness depends on pride in the nation of your residence, then I should imagine that you lack other things to be proud of.

          • Nick in Beijing

            I should rephrase that slightly. I am proud to be living abroad, far away from home, and entirely independently. However, the name of the nation that I am living in means little to me. I would feel pride if China transformed itself into a bastion of progress and humanitarian works. My grandfather was proud to relocate to America from Greece in the 1910s. That doesn’t mean he couldn’t hack it in Greece, it meant that he saw opportunity in a new land. His pride in being a new American grew when the system he found himself in granted him freedoms and opportunities that his homeland denied him which allowed him to become prosperous.

            China’s newest visa policies are both troubling for those who are susceptible to such changes, but promising with regards to how the Chinese government’s regard for foreigners who intend to purchase land in China is changing.

            If China were to make efforts to integrate itself in the international community more, develop itself as a scientific power which strives to make modern contributions to the human species, rather than simply following nationalistic agendas, then I would feel pride for the nation of my residence. Until then I have plenty to be proud of about myself, and pride in a nation is not required to sustain me.

          • ReddSept .

            Alex, move on, you lost the debate. What you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever
            read. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to
            anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is
            now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have
            mercy on your soul. Now tell your Mom goodnight and close the basement door.

          • Alex Dương

          • Nick in Beijing

            You should have been tipped off that he was quoting something when he wrote “listened” instead of “read”.

          • Alex Dương

            I’ve watched Billy Madison before.

          • Nick in Beijing

            Then that makes you part of a very elite club consisting only of millions upon millions who have also watched the movie. Congratulations.

          • Alex Dương

            You probably should’ve guessed that seeing as how I responded with a link of that clip within two minutes.

          • Nick in Beijing

            I guess it’s true that sarcasm isn’t conveyed well online.

          • Alex Dương

            Oh, I knew you were being sarcastic. I was just pointing out that it was misplaced.

          • Nick in Beijing

            And I was pointing out that it was obvious.

          • Nick in Beijing

            By the way, nice job taking my posting about how we as a species should be working towards mutual progress and development and turning it into some garbage about nationality.

          • Alex Dương

            You did that yourself when you implied that you weren’t proud of living in China. If you don’t like it, then leave. So many Chinese have already done that for that very reason. Oh wait, you can’t leave because while there’s more to life than financial security, without China, you have no way of earning a living.

          • moody

            i think very few expats regard China as being there adopted country.
            No matter how much you love the country, it often shows it does not love you back, and are often told you are not desired here and can go back home.
            as for thinking that expats are here because they can’t get a job back home, it simply is moronic.

          • Terrik

            I love it when people give that “you can’t make it back home” comeback to criticisms about China. Who exactly is being insulted here—the expat, or the country that apparently is satisfied with taking the “refuse” of foreign countries?

          • Alex Dương

            It wasn’t a “comeback to a criticism about China” because expressing an opinion that you aren’t proud to live in China isn’t a criticism about China. Selectively reading comments to fit a prejudice that Chinese people are Nazi jingoists isn’t criticism, either; it’s just dishonest behavior.

            I simply find it amusing that a person continues to live in China even though he openly states that he isn’t proud of living in the country. If so, why doesn’t he move? Simple answer: he can’t. Only in China can he make a living.

            Not all expats in China are like Nick, but clearly you and Moody are his type. As for who is being insulted, don’t people like you always like to talk about how U.S. embassies in China are filled with Chinese people trying to get out whereas the opposite is not true in the U.S.? Gee, what does that say about you?

          • KamikaziPilot

            And then there are those like me who will never love any country. I only love people, those that are close to me. I still don’t get how people can honestly say they love a whole country.

          • moody

            you are so right KP
            i sort of meant it’s people.

            How have you been my favorite Proboscis monkey ?
            how’s it hanging ? literally :-p

          • KamikaziPilot

            Haha, I’m surprised so many people know the name of my monkey. BTW my nose really looks like that. I’ve been good. How about you? I’m guessing you haven’t been getting much sleep with your Mini-me running circles around you.

          • moody

            Wow, such nose, you certainly keep tha lady happy
            You could not be more spot on actually, must have a camera inside my place, it s impossible otherwise.
            my kid look just like me and he just started walking,
            well, not on his own, so the wife and I hold him up and let the little bugger put one feet in front of the other until he gets tired.
            thing is, we are exhausted in a matter of minutes, while he seems unstopable
            I’m a little worried, he has a fascination for the Kitchen, all those shinny appliances, not sure how we are going to keep him out of there to be on the safe side
            the best to you my Primate friend

          • Alex Dương

            You also have bad reading comprehension ability. I said “expats like you,” not “expats.” “Like you” is a qualifier.

      • Kai

        You’re not the only person who feels Nick comments with a glaringly consistent and irksome prejudice but I think you made the mistake of calling him out on it with an ad hominem, and that is beneath your level of demonstrated intelligence.

        You’re annoyed by his behavior and decided to respond by putting him down, highlighting what you think to be embarrassing aspects of his education, history, work, etc. You’re ultimately trying to counter his speech by eroding his credibility in the eyes of others. It’s character assassination and you’re smarter than this.

        You don’t think he comments with context or nuance, either out of ignorance or deliberate contempt. That can be a legitimate criticism. So provide that context and nuance to show how he is being unfair or unreasonable. Even more impressive is if you could actually subtly steer him towards realizing it himself without him ever seeing you as an antagonist. Granted, few people are Socrates, much less myself.

        Anyway, know that your gripe isn’t necessarily unwarranted, but I think you’d have to admit your chosen course of response here wasn’t smart either. It’s just a variation of how some critics of China dismiss disagreement by characterizing detractors as “brainwashed”, “apologists”, or “ethnically biased”.

        • Alex Dương

          Rebuke accepted. I have to admit that I have an axe to grind here because I’ve encountered people like Nick elsewhere: they state that they work in China, but they trash the country constantly to the point where I ask, “why are you even there?” And then the ad hominems start flying, which I agree is not proper.

          • Kai

            Trust me, I can empathize with your annoyance and frustration. I won’t lie, while there is some subjective gratification, there’s just little real profit in responding to demagoguery with more demagoguery. All it does is pander to the poles when the real fight is for the middle.

  • Germandude

    Honestly, I never heard of the skydisk. Interesting read, thank you for that.

  • Cauffiel

    Maybe this landing should come with an announcement that all Soviet-style inland launch sites, designed to hide technology rather than enhance it, and which force mass evacuations in the launch path, are to be closed, and further launches will be take place near the coast line…. but no, the government will just do more horrible shit, and everyone will give them a pass with a chuckle and a shrug.

  • Nick in Beijing

    Maybe next time they will attach rockets to the people living underground to lift them out of the manholes.

  • nqk123

    the flag is still there. although it turn white now

  • ReddSept .

    you should really watch the video, unless you’d rather just live in your “broken camera” alternative reality

  • Cameron

    China, in its current form, though growing in influence, wiill never replace the US in importance or influence. human innovation and expression will always be suffocated in a Communist state, one that prizes the communal over the individual, and breeds third rate universities and companies that can only offer bargain basement versions of US/ European products.

    • shit religion

      go learn what communism means again :) china is not a communist country anymore.

    • Probotector

      Not only that, American popular culture is one of the main driving forces behind it’s status as the world super power, and by implication, although not exclusively, one of the main driving forces behind it’s economy. American influence in movies, music, literature, fashion, sports, architecture, etc. etc. The rest of the world that subscribes to American popular culture is not all of a sudden going to put down hamburgers and stop watching Angelina Jolie movies and start picking up chop sticks and fangbian mian and start watching Fan Bing Bing movies.

      Then again, look at how Japanese culture began taking the West by storm in the 80s and 90s. This gives your point about the suffocation of human expression and innovation in China more merit. Still, they were unable to penetrate as far, and it’s unlikely that any country, even if they’re as creative as Japan, will ever hold a cultural influence over the world as strong as America’s. American culture reigns supreme in the world because it appeals to our basic pleasures and because it’s presented in English.

  • Stamos

    The moon was, is and always will be an integral part of China. Any attempt to interfere with the internal affairs of China’s Moon will severely hurt the feelings of 1.3 billion Chinese.

  • Tony Heaney

    Hello china, i have a special request. The place where Neil Armstrong landed on the moon is not documented. July 21, 1969 is however given as the date when he officially landed on the moon. Several allegations have since emerged that NASA faked the landing with most questioning the authenticity of the photographic evidence. Could you have a look around and let us know if they lied.

  • Nick in Beijing

    I’m not sure what it is that makes you think I care about what you have to say, given your lack of participation in the debate, so I kindly request that you go fuck yourself.

  • Rationalise

    I wonder, if China is really so great, why does it need to open its economy?

    • Nessquick Choco

      because it is that great, so they open to the rest of the world, and share the resources, research and ingeneering with us. You don’t know this simple fact ?

      • Rationalise

        So why didn’t it become great while still closed?

        • Nessquick Choco

          sarcasm bro…

          yea, they was that faked up, that the last think they was willing to do, have come true. so they open the gates

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