Beijing Chinese Aunties “Fight Japanese Devils” with “AK47s”

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-01

Currently the most discussed photo feature on Chinese web portal NetEase…

From NetEase:

Beijing Aunties Carry Guns and Dance on the Streets “Fighting [Japanese] Devils”

2014 June 27 report, Beijing — Recently, a group of aunties carrying toy guns have been putting on a “fighting [Japanese] devils” show in front of a mall in Dongzhimen. They carry toy AK47 rifles and alternate between walking in formation and brandishing their rifles. At the climax of the performance, a “Japanese devil” wearing a Japanese military cap and white t-shirt appears and the aunties suddenly become “wives of the resistance against Japanese aggression” who with their guns surround the “devil”, forcing the “devil” to have no choice but to raise his arms in surrender. Photos: CFP

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-02

Photo is of the old man who plays the “Japanese devil” appearing in the performance. Photo: Ma Ke

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-03

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-04

Photo is of the “Japanese devil” being surrounded.

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-05

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-06

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-07

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-08

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-09

Photo is of the aunties wielding swords on the street.

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-10

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-11

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-12

Photo is of the scene of the aunties dancing.

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-13

Photo is of the aunties carrying guns plaza dancing on the street.

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-14

Chinese "aunties" (older middle-aged women) carying toy AK-47 rifles plaza dancing and "fighting Japanese devils" on the streets of Beijing.

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-16

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-17

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-18

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-19

beijing-chinese-aunties-fight-imperial-japanese-devils-toy-guns-street-performance-20

Comments from NetEase:

网易江苏省连云港市手机网友 ip:180.105.*.*:

Don’t stop medical treatment.

网易广东省广州市手机网友 ip:117.136.*.*:

So much YY.

网易新加坡手机网友(14.100.*.*):

Probably thugs/scoundrels when they were young, and still the same now that they’re old.

daoban008200 [网易天津市网友]: (responding to above)

It’s not that the old have become bad, but that the bad have become old.

咬人的兔子 [网易浙江省宁波市手机网友]:

Unbelievable, a bunch of old garbage who have only worn red armbands [of the Red Guard in the Cultural Revolution] beating up Chinese people want to fight Japanese devils.

另一种真相 [网易上海市网友]:

1. There’s nothing wrong with plaza dancing, it is just a way of exercising, and quite effective [as exercise] too.
2. A minority of people next to residential areas affecting the rest of other people, is wrong, and should be criticized, but many more middle to old aged people are in public plazas, parks, and such areas [not affecting residents]. I see a lot of young people also joining in, so what is wrong with this?
3. The [city] planning for leisure spaces for the masses is unreasonable, so criticisms should be unanimously aimed at land developers, aimed at city planners. Why should the masses fight against themselves?
4. There are a lot of people who disturb others. Those who don’t respect traffic regulations, who litter everywhere, who set up barbeque skewer stands on the side of the street with thick smoke affecting others…you don’t criticize. Land developers stealing your money, your boss docking your hard-earned wages…you don’t criticize. Instead you focus only on criticizing the elderly, as if you were so heroic.

5. Those who say elderly people exercising are “remaining evils” [of the Cultural Revolution] who should hurry up and die, please ask your parents, aunts, uncles, etc. to die first, because it just so happens that these generations of “remaining evil” were the ones who raised you.
6. The reason a lot of old people plaza dance is because their children are busy working and can’t spend time with them. They are killing time and relieving boredom. When you criticize and curse the elderly, first think about how much you have cared and provided for your parents’ waning years and how much filial piety you have lived up to.
7. Apart from plaza dancing, are there things such as elderly scamming/extorting people [with false injury claims] and making unreasonable scenes on public transportation? Yes! However, those are a minority of elderly people. The media and public intellectuals/commentators always just report the negatives of a minority of elderly people. But how many kindly elderly people are there in this country? How many positive energy [influence] elderly are there throughout the country? Why aren’t they reported on? If we put aside the elderly altogether, there are N amount of people in society who do good things, but why doesn’t the media and public commentators report about them? The One Foundation also has problems, but why does the media and public commentators only criticize Chen Guangbiao? Etc.?

This kind of long-term selectivity in what news/information is shown you, is it not also a kind of brainwashing? Have you ever wondered why? A flock of people who only know how to spend their days doing nothing by cursing and criticizing.
Let me tell you something:
“Don’t treat ignorance as personality!!!”

kingdeeceo [网易广东省深圳市网友]:

It’s said that when the chengguan are annihilated [defeated]… dispatch the Chinese aunties… then… Tokyo will be surrounded within two days… When the general offensive commences… all of Tokyo will suddenly sound “the vast sky is my love…” [lyrics to a song popular with plaza dancing Chinese aunties, see below]… the aunties will dance… negative attack power… then… the auntie soldiers… Japan is taken…

抽烟的夜猫 [网易江苏省常州市网友]:

There is this group of people:
When American police open fire, it is called upholding justice, but when Chinese police who open fire, it is called treating people’s lives as nothing. When the United States updates its weapons, it is called safeguarding world peace, but when China builds an aircraft carrier, it is called exhausting the nation’s resources to build up military power. When the United States cracks down on terrorism, it is called patriotism, but when China cracks down on terrorism, it is called violating [human rights]. When Americans run red lights, it is called freedom and no big deal, but when Chinese people run red lights, it is called the inferiority of an ethnicity. When Americans do garish things for art, it is called freedom of art, but when aunties dance and sing some elegant old songs, then they are “remaining evils” who must die terrible deaths.

Still this group of people:
They cry for freedom of speech every day but the Edward Snowden who exposed the PRISM program is criticized in every possible way. Every day they yap about democracy and constitutional government but say nothing when the United States supports the Egyptian military in overthrowing the democratically elected government. They harshly ridicule Chinese for putting on shows [publicity stunts] yet flatter and fawn over Obama buying a pumpkin.

Even still this group of people:
When Russia and China stands together in opposing the United States, they will say Putin is a dictator. When someone compares Russia and China, they say Russia has realized democracy and freedom. When Russia stands off against the United States, they jeer that Russia has already been reduced to a second-rate/second-world country. When comparing the development of China and Russia, they praise Russia as being stronger and more powerful than the Soviet Union.

I want to say [to this group]:
You idiots, why are you so ridiculous? Would it kill you to not be so hypocritical [have such double standards]?

dbdlsq [网易辽宁省大连市网友]:

I don’t dare say Dalian is where plaza dancing appeared earliest, but it was one of the earliest places where it appeared in the country. However, the dancers and onlookers (city residents who don’t participate in the dancing) in Dalian are very harmonious. The dancers in their revelry get to manifest their inner selves, exercise their bodies, refine their characters. The onlookers are in turn influenced and get pleasant enjoyment. It is very harmonious. The key is that plaza dancing must have quality, aesthetic beauty, be classy, where the dancers dance and the onlookers are [positively] influenced. The government shouldn’t necessarily meddle in everything, but it can guide it in a positive direction, by dispatching professionals to provide instruction to the ordinary common people dancers, to constantly raise their artistic ability, making them become a scenic part of the city. Dalian, it is worth coming to visit.
Everyone has elderly people in their families, and everyone will get old. The elderly having interests/hobbies is not a bad thing. If your interests can bring happiness to others, that would be the best. Thank you, everyone.

从文革过来 [网易广东省江门市网友]:

The capital city has an exceptionally large amount of retards, probably related to smog entering their brains.

春哥附体 [网易广东省深圳市网友]:

The most disgusting period of history, the most disgusting generation of people.

Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • lonetrey / Dan

    This article is anti-government!!! These events are clearly biased and insulting to our ancestor’s memories!

    Clearly, they mean to call our brave young men who served as soldiers weak as old aunties! I mean, they even reinforce that attack on their character by censoring their strength! How else would you explain the lack of hand-ripping apart Japanese devils in half?!?

    • David

      lol

  • Repatriated

    I wish the media would stop giving these idiots attention.

  • bujiebuke

    Oh noes! Who gave Chinese aunties AK47s?? The plastic orange tip and duck tape suggest it’s a new communist prototype, perhaps it shoots lasers instead of bullets. Just look at their smiling and galavanting faces – those cherubic little flirts. We all know this is the prelude to a Chinese invasion of “defenceless” Japan.

    Relax and have a McGriddle people, they’re allowed to have some fun. And if it’s at the expensive of some past invaders then so fucking be it. At least Chinese aunties seem to enjoy life, as opposed to the younger generation who walk around like zombies.

    Oh btw, lovely title and description of guns without any sort of qualification. Not sensational at all. No alarmists here, no sir.

    • Kai

      I think the scare quotes around “Japanese Devils” was a sort of qualification. As for the description of the guns, the actual description for the post explicitly says “toy guns” but if you’re upset about the title itself, I can understand and I’ll see if I can squeeze two more scare quotes in there. Otherwise, it’s a fairly descriptive title echoing the title of the original Chinese article.

      • bujiebuke

        Haha. Yes, gotta insert “yellow peril” somewhere, otherwise what’s the point of the article.

  • bang2tang

    new cultural creation of PRC reminds me of war dance by maori.

  • Insomnicide

    “Unbelievable, a bunch of old garbage who have only worn red armbands [of the Red Guard in the Cultural Revolution] beating up Chinese people want to fight Japanese devils.”

    Exactly. I’m so done with hearing anti-Japanese sentiments from that generation. They are the least qualified to be considered patriots and role models considering how much they’ve stabbed their own kind in the back.

    • Mighty曹

      Not to mention stabbing their own parents’ backs.

      • JabroniZamboni

        I think I know where you are coming from, but for the sake of entertainment as well as being slightly sloppy….elaborate.

        • Mighty曹

          Many of these Red Guards, who were in their youth, informed on their own parents as “Counter Revolutionary”.

          • JabroniZamboni

            that wasn’t very entertaining:(.

          • Mighty曹

            Some find it entertaining in the fact that most of these brainwashed Red Guards don’t even understand what ‘counter revolutionary’ meant.

          • Honibaz

            Reminds me of Nineteen Eighty-Four.

          • Mighty曹

            Orson Welles? Wrote a book essay on it.

    • JabroniZamboni

      They have no problem with Japan being China’s 5th biggest trading partner. Essentially, with a history as checkered as China’s in the past 50+ years, an enemy is needed to take the mind off of these things. As someone with western eyes, I can’t say that I agree with this mentality; however, it does seem to work to drum up a little bit of patriotism. You can’t expect them to stand up and say, “Our country is shit in a xioalongbao!”. We foreigners might not agree, but alas they do not have a recent history to find great pride in. Every culture needs pride. You can never be against who you are. Human nature, regardless of ethnicity.

      • Paulistano

        You might right about chinese recent history, but I do think that chinese has enough reasons to be proud about being chinese, their history is a proof of pride even though numerous mistakes and shames. Actually, I sincerely think some chinese are very arrogant, they think that China is the center of the world and Asia, thus earning the right to smash other countries. China is a superb country with great ancient culture and history, but their greatness come from quantity and not quality.

        • ElectricTurtle

          China has been the cultural center of East Asia since basically forever. Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Mongolia, etc. have copied and syncretized Chinese writing, music, art, fashion, design, philosophy, food, strategy, etc. for thousands of years… and to say it’s quantity over quality is to be ignorant (and to perpetuate ignorance) of the breadth and depth of millennia of artifacts that were the pinnacle of human ability. Look at the Sword of Goujian and other bronzework from the nearly thousand years of the Zhou Dynasty alone, all before Rome was anything more than a village.

          • JabroniZamboni

            I wholeheartedly agree with some of the historic aspects of this argument,; however, Chinese culture has also infringed on a few traditions that were not strictly its own.

            While culture promotes an “identity”, cultural pillaging actually at times helps to further other cultures into a broader spectrum of understanding.

            Modern China needs to find a real identity. This could be a really great country if there is more attention paid to “social training”. I sound like Hitler with a comment as such; however, if the world at large viewed China as a more progressive place, with slightly more manners introduced at a basic level in their schooling…this country could very well assume its contentions towards becoming the global hegemony that they seem to desire to be!

          • ElectricTurtle

            Name these infringements. Of course China wasn’t immune to some outside influences, especially during high water mark trading periods, but it hasn’t been until the last couple centuries that they’ve really lost their ‘identity’.

            It’s really not surprising, the Manchus learned their history properly so as not to repeat the Mongols’ mistakes. China’s identity was deliberately destroyed in the culture war that occurred parallel to and following the Ming-Qing transition. Chinese hairstyles and dress were banned on pain of death, and the saddest part is that after four centuries of that shit, the Chinese themselves forgot who they were. When the Qing were overthrown the proscriptions were gone but the momentum was such that many Han Chinese thought queues and mandarin collars were “their” culture since that had been forced on them for so many generations. I actually have a painting on silk where the figures are wearing hanfu but the wrap is going the wrong direction… and it’s because the artist didn’t know which direction was right…

            Post-Xinhai China started copying the West because of the real and perceived success of Japan’s copying the West and industrialization (not coincidental with the time Dr. Sun Yat-sen spent in Japan). Then along came Mao who convinced the country that copying the West was bad unless it was the communist West, so for the next several dozen years they copied the communist West (and of its shitty, shitty architecture and art and music) until Mao died and Deng and his successors thought it would be good to go back to copying the capitalist West (which did indeed improve the architecture, art, music etc. among the more obvious economic things).

            All that aside China remains schizophrenic about it’s pseudo-Western cultural facade and its own semi-lapsed traditions and aesthetic. Some of the traditional architecture is finally coming back, and there is also the hanfu movement however marginal, but how likely is it and/or how necessary is it for China to overcome the world monoculture? Traditions of style and art and such have died throughout the world, practiced now only by each culture’s luddites, anachronists and hipsters. I don’t think it’s truly rational to expect China to be an exception.

          • Chris

            Let me guess, you believe that Japanese language come from Chinese? I talk about the language, not the writing system, I heard this shit so many times from pro-China ignorant morons, they couldn’t be further from the truth.

          • Confucius

            Chris, a lot of Japanese language and culture does come from China. The same can be said about many languages. In fact, many modern day Chinese terms are directly borrowed from English, although it isn’t as pervasive as the Chinese influence on Japan. But the sense of superiority one feels from the Chinese when they say things like that does irritate. It should be pointed out to them that they are borrowing Japanese words and concepts now as well. Don’t let your irritation and bias influence your knowledge and beliefs.

          • ElectricTurtle

            I said writing, not language. I know my history rather well, in case you weren’t paying attention, which you evidently weren’t. Though on the subject of language, I’m of the camp that believes Japanese was derived from Altaic languages, which also bothers some Japanese people since that would make clear that they migrated to Japan from the Steppes.

          • NiceOne

            I rather enjoy reading ElectricTurtle’s comments. They feel quite objective and very informative. Confucious (as posted above) concluded nicely: “Don’t let your irritation and bias influence your knowledge and beliefs.” I couldn’t agree more. I’m enjoying this thread.

          • Mike

            Actually it’s quite true if we’re talking about Japanese vocabulary/expressions/phrases and not about grammar/syntax.

            All the ON-yomi words in Japanese have Chinese origins. This means >50% of the Japanese words currently in use are from China. The KUN-yomi words are native to Japan and they make up the other 50%.

          • Dick Leigh

            China doesn’t need a cultural identity, it needs freedom. The only reason anti-japanese dramas are so big in the first place is because it was one of the least censored genres.

            Taiwan and Hong Kong are relatively free, and they have secure cultural identities too.

          • Paulistano

            Yes, I agree that China was very influential in East Asia and no one can deny that.
            No, will repeat my statemant, ”their greatness come from quantity and not quality”, Europe invented much more things in one hundread years (1800-1900) than Han and Manchu people in almost two thousand years (0-1900 A.D) considering that chinese people had much more brains (10x, 100x more??). If China didn’t invented anything with so many people, China would be mocked as stupid people.

            Pinnacle of human ability? Chinese artifacts are cool and interesting (no trolling), but Middle East said ”bitch please”. While I agree Zhou Dynasty is a very interesting subject to study, you can’t compare with Rome. Rome brought much more technological, science and laws advance for the world than Zhou dynasty (you compared first), even modern german states (Holy Roman Empire) were proud to carry ”roman” in their name (although it has nothing rome about) until nineteenth century.

          • ElectricTurtle

            China didn’t invent so much? O RLY? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_inventions

            Not to mention without Chinese inventions Europe would have all of jack and shit. Where would Europe or indeed the world be without paper and gunpowder?

            I’m sorry, would you like to show me some Middle Eastern swords that are 2500 years old? Oh wait, you can’t, because only China figured out the proper metallurgical techniques to forge things that would last that long in near mint condition.

            And I didn’t compare the Zhou Dynasty to Rome, I merely related it in time as a reference. If you want to compare against Rome, there is the Tang Dynasty whose capital Chang’an was at its height four times larger than Rome ever was, and indeed was the largest city ever built by mankind until 19th century London reset the stats. And this was achieved while Europe was in a dark age of illiteracy and cultural recession ushered in by the collapse of Rome in the West, which, I hasten to add for all its cyclic turmoil has never happened in China.

            Rome actually was far more an inheritor than a producer of technological progress. Aside from some architectural triumphs, most “Roman” technology of significance was “borrowed” from the more scientific Greeks and their colonies. Either way, they actually lagged China important aspects. The Chinese invented a calendar as accurate as the Julian centuries earlier and were using both natural gas and oil albeit at a fairly localized and limited capacity.

            As for law, the Chinese meritocratic system was more effective than the Roman, since very few lower class Romans were ever able to change their fortunes or wield meaningful power. With few exceptions (most notably Cicero), the most plebeians could hope for was tribuneship, and that was more a bone thrown to the vulgar masses by the Senate than a real position of power. However since legalism effectively ended aristocracy and hereditary class in China before the Roman republic had even left Italy, many Chinese of inherent talent were able to achieve high offices and change the fortunes of their families and clans on a regular basis. Indeed, legalism itself is worth praising as one of the first coherent and complete secular systems of law and governance. Whereas if you read things like Cicero’s De Legibus he makes all sorts of insinuations about divine backgrounds even as he tries to build a case for natural law. (Then again, that’s a common theme in the West, as Aquinas and Locke did the same sort of shit. Personally I think that natural law is fundamentally at odds with any sort of superstitious/supernatural “foundation”, but then that view is entirely a product of the last century.)

          • jon9521

            The ancient Greeks had steel quench hardened swords around 2500 year ago..

          • ElectricTurtle

            So, show me one that is in a condition equivalent to the Sword of Goujian. It’s not simply the forging method, it’s the metallurgical alloy mixtures at different points.

          • jon9521

            The Tang dynasty was after the height of the Roman empire. Rome was an empire that subdued many races and countries, The tang dynasty was master over the pre-united Chinese people. Not the same.

          • ElectricTurtle

            There is never going to be a pure apples to apples comparison of human achievements across cultures, eras and geographies.

          • Myk

            “I’m sorry, would you like to show me some Middle Eastern swords that are 2500 years old?”

            5000 years old swords found in Turkey:
            http://dekunukem.deviantart.com/journal/Oldest-Swords-Found-in-Turkey-369725919

          • ElectricTurtle

            That’s not the Middle East, that’s the Near East. Furthermore those look like total shit and are pitted and corroded unlike the sword of Goujian.

          • Myk

            Well, Quality wasn’t actually a part of your question, but let’s continue this discussion in another 2500 years or so and lets see what your sword looks like then.

          • Zappa Frank

            CHang’an was estimated to had 1 milion people, that is the same as the imperial Rome. However population numbers do not have any meaning..
            chinese did not invented wheels.. in the ancient rome even a soldier had chance to become imperator, and in fact happened.
            i don’t go further because i’m afraid this can easily become a flame.

          • donscarletti

            Check it out, not so hard: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronze_Age_sword Also, you should visit the British Museum some time. IIRC they have a great collection of swords from the Bronze and Iron ages from Europe and the Middle East.

            Anyway. What your missing is that while China made great discoveries in many areas in ancient times, it also missed out on many others. Mathematics, geometry and astronomy were particularly lacking in China until their introduction from Europe by Jesuits in the 16th century.

            Chemistry too, despite the fortuitous discovery of
            gunpowder was sorely lacking compared to the Arab and Persian people, even during the Tang and Song dynasties when Chinese economy and military power was the greatest in the world.

            The Han dynasty calender suffered from pretty irregular drift of both the new lunar month and the solar new year and had a 19 year cycle. The accurate Chinese calender you refer to (current lunar calender or 农历) was actually divised by Xu Guangqi in the 16th century based on western astronomical models. Most of the books Xu Guangqi (who’s district I was honoured to live in for a year) translated from into Chinese, like Euclid’s work, were actually close to two millenia old at the time and that knowledge that was unknown in China until then.

            I sense from you that you are young and have a great admiration for Chinese history. This is not wrong. But you cannot simply bash everything else like you did just then. The Romans may not have done as much for mathematics as the Greeks for instance, but they invented concrete, municipal water supply, central heating, swimming pools, and their calendar only had a 4 year cycle and minimal drift of solstace or calculated new moons.

            You can point to Hadrian’s wall and ask why it is not as high or as strong as great as the great wall of China. But you could also ask why the Han Dynasty didn’t build anything as delicate but enduring like the Pantheon. Or compare the Qin’s Lingqu canal with a Roman aqueduct, one is wide, one is high. Qin could not have built the Pont du Guard or Sergovia Aqueduct any more than Caesar could have built a terracotta army.

            Also, you have to remember that Europe was not completely dead in the middle ages. Machinery in particular, such as clocks and mills were surpassing both Rome and China is sophistication. The blast furnace, the origin of modern steel making was invented in medievil Europe, as was the book, the printing press (rather than Chinese printing blocks, and movable type blocks which were not practical or widely used). So while Tang was richer and more powerful than any European state, it was not universally dominent in every aspect.

            So I think you should just acknowledge that before the age of the internet, information travelled slowly and various places had various gaps in their knowledge. Ancient Chinese did many brilliant things, but so did many other ancient people.

      • Jahar

        I thought Japan was China’s second largest trade partner

    • Paulistano

      Actually, I have pity of them, they (some of them) were truly pratriots by heart when they were young, but their ignorance and wrong support for their leader nearly destroyed China.

    • mr.wiener

      Good to see most of the netizins are seeing through this BS.

    • kenhansen

      Just FYI, then China is a harmonious society and peace loving country that seek mutually beneficial solutions through dialogue

      • anon101

        its not chinas fault that is has land disputes with Japan, South Korea, Veitnam, the Philippines, Thailand, Pakistan, India, North Korea (Baekdu Mountain + Jiandao), Cambodia, Bhutan, Malaysia, Brunei, Tajikistan.. not to mention parts that china has military control over but they dont like or want to be ruled by beijing like most of the west of china, Tibet, hong kong etc.

        • Alex Dương

          Oh, it’s amazing indoor plumbing guy again. I’m very curious to know how China can have land disputes with Thailand and Cambodia when it doesn’t share a border with either of those two countries (who perhaps not coincidentally, do in fact have a border dispute). As for Pakistan and Tajikistan, you might be forgiven for not knowing that China and Tajikistan resolved their dispute in 2011, but China and Pakistan resolved their dispute in 1963.

          Otherwise, yes, China has disputes with Japan, Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines, India, Malaysia, and Brunei. Good job.

    • mike921

      I wonder how many of them were collaborators now trying to clear their consciences before the end of their lives…

  • ex-expat

    Jesus come off the Japanese stuff already…

  • The real enemy of China is….Chinese stupidity

    • Mighty曹

      Such irony!

    • The real enemy of the world is human stupidity. Doesn’t apply only to China, Fred

      • KamikaziPilot

        As much as stupidity makes me nauseous, I’d have to rank greed ahead of it

      • fabulous

        His comment does apply to the article though.

        • fabulous observation

          • fabulous

            Does his comment not apply to the article though?

    • NeverMind

      Oh girls just wanna have some fun…

    • David Smith

      “When Americans run red lights, it is called freedom and no big deal, but when Chinese people run red lights, it is called the inferiority of an ethnicity.”

      /facepalm.

      Proof Chinese have no idea what freedom even means.

      • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

        Pretty sure that guy is either an wumao or way off topic.

      • Nor Bolbe

        How would you know what something is, if you’ve never experienced it?

        Think “its like a bag of sand” (40 year old virgin).

        He still made a valid point overall.

    • mr.wiener

      Stupidity in general is the enemy of people everywhere. If only we could harness it as a renewable source of propulsion.

  • Freddi BuBu

    Just a matter of time before Americans develop a fetish for these Chinese “aunties”…..lol!

    • Paulistano

      Errrrrrrr………no!!!

    • JabroniZamboni

      If they have no teeth, i suppose it could be sexy.

      • Mighty曹

        Hahahaha…. eww……. no thanks!

      • Chris

        Rotten teeth are considered beautiful in northern China, so many people have them, or don’t have them.

  • Mighty曹

    Commie Aunties and Nazi salutes don’t mix. (pic #15)

  • JabroniZamboni

    If my ayi was only as handy with a sponge, as with a toy machine gun….

    • Mighty曹

      They should all be handy with brooms and volunteer to sweep the streets instead of doing silly dances.

      • JabroniZamboni

        I just want a clean house. 2 months training to properly clean a bathroom:p

        • Mighty曹

          Ayi can accomplish that goal in a month if she doesn’t waste time on plaza dancing. :D

          • JabroniZamboni

            No she can’t. 5 different tries. My standard of clean, and their standard of “clean”, are on amazingly different levels. My toilet/shower doesn’t need a spit-shine. It needs bleach.

          • Mighty曹

            Very true about ‘different levels’ on standard of clean. Their clean is my “Are you sure that’s clean” clean.

          • ex-expat

            Lol at my last job in China the woman who would clean would use the toilet as a bucket for her mop.

          • Chris

            You have to show them once and they should do it the right way.
            My ayi used to clean the windows and mirrors with water, I introduced her to the window cleaner, now she does it perfectly. She used to clean the toilet bowl with the toilet brush, I showed her the toilet bowl bleach and the gloves.

  • PixelPulse

    I told you Chinese aunties plaza dancing were gonna take over the world, now there gonna start doing it with guns and swords.

  • What a waste of plastic… the ghosts from the past

  • YourSupremeCommander

    These brainwashed got nothing better to do and past their prime chicks are almost nut jobs.

    • JabroniZamboni

      The backdoor is still locked. Young for 5 minutes.

  • wnsk

    Could it be that it’s just a “theme”, and that the aunties aren’t taking it as seriously as the netizens/commentators are?

  • Guest

    ;)

  • Guest

    I bet this guy has more balls

    • NeverMind

      Just like Edward Snowden

      • David

        Snowden did not stand up to anything. He simply betrayed his country in secret than ran away to hide with its enemies. Zero balls.

        • ex-expat

          Exactly. He’s a fucking traitor, nothing more.

          • Nor Bolbe

            Who did Snowden betray? His Gov’t or the Citizens of the US? The NSA treats the US citizens like terrorists.

          • Dr Sun

            He betrayed no one but a secret government organization that was ( and most likely still is breaking the law), his actions defended the constitution and all people in the USA. He is a Hero and should be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and made the permanent head of the ” Intelligence oversight committee”

        • Kai

          I agree he ran away, and that’s for self-preservation, but I disagree that he “didn’t stand up to anything”. He stood up against the most powerful country in the world and hides with the only other political entities that could reasonably stand up against the US’s influence and reach. It takes alot of balls to give up your existing life and become a fugitive over an ideal.

          Nobody knows what happened to tank man, but we do know a lot about many of the student leaders who fled Tiananmen, for their own self-preservation, while so many others died or have suffered for them. Is that cowardly of them? In some ways, maybe, but in other ways, it doesn’t or at least shouldn’t completely detract from what they did and why. Same for Snowden.

          • David

            Except he didn’t give up his life for an idea. He was found out. He stayed and leaked secrets for as long as he thought he could do it safely. He has been portrayed as some kind of hero. He is just a guy who (instead of reporting the abuse to the proper oversight organization) gave reams of classified information to a group of hackers who published it. This has cost the U.S. so much in terms of ruined assets, the number of lives ruined will never bee= known for sure (he ruined many lives of people who thought they were doing the right thing by actually standing up to THEIR countries horrible human rights abuses and cooperating with the U.S.) He gave raw intelligence that was posted on-line without, in many cases, having names removed. He betrayed those who trusted him with the safety of my country. All for what? To tell the world the NSA spies on people? Wow, what a major break. BTW many of the hundreds of of thousands of documents released were not about spying abuses. There is no such thing as spying abuses, you spy on anybody and everybody you can, EVERY country does it, we just did it better than others. He deserves a traitors death. And the country that is harboring him is only doing it to stick a finger in our eye. If he had been a Russian or Chinese intelligence officer who had done it, they would have killed him long ago for doing the exact same thing. Of course people who don’t like the U.S.and foreign governments were happy with him.

          • Kai

            What you’re saying doesn’t reconcile with the information I’ve read in the past and summarized on Wikipedia. For example:

            1. If he was “found out”, he wouldn’t have been given the leave he needed to go to Hong Kong.

            2. He first leaked information to a journalist and documentary filmmaker, not hackers. He went to the press first, and that single-handedly did the most good.

            3. He says he reported the abuse to multiple officials and had exhausted his legal avenues for recourse/whistleblowing.

            4. I think there are valid criticisms of how he handled the disclosure of information, and the damage his disclosures may have had on people who don’t deserve it. However, I don’t think it can be denied that he has done something that has helped the public consider the “good” and “desirability” of what the US government and its partners are doing to them and others ostensibly “in their name” yet “without their knowledge”. Both need to be recognized, not played off each other to justify each. They stand on their own.

            5. Just because everyone does it doesn’t make it right.

            6. The American people deserve to know what their government is doing to them as codified in American law and by past judicial precedent.

            7. Yeah, Russia and China would likely have Russian and Chinese intelligence officers killed for doing the same thing, and they have gotten asylum in the US. The countries that habor him definitely want to stick a finger in the US’s eye. The US arguably deserves a finger it its eye for its hypocrisy just as these other countries get a finger in their eye for theirs.

            Your emphatic arguments here are an appeal to a fallacy, a fallacy of bias, bias against these countries, an appeal to nationalism. I don’t agree with that. I empathize with self-interest and I empathize with wanting to defend your (our) country, but I believe there are limits to what our government can do in the name of “protecting” us or itself. If you disagree with Snowden’s actions, he’s a “traitor”. If you agree with his actions or at least his motivations, he’s a “whistleblower”. Both terms exist for good reasons. We all have to judge which term we want to call him.

            Snowden believes in something and he gave up his life to become a fugitive of the world’s most powerful nation for it. However bad what he released makes the US government look, that we as Americans can publicly and freely debate about it is still a credit to the US government. That Snowden HASN’T been offed is also a credit to the US government. These stand apart from whether or not what the government was doing was “right” and thus whether or not it was “right” for Snowden to bring greater public scruitny to it.

            Ultimately, whether people see him as a traitor or a whistleblower depends on your values, the relative priorities you ascribe to values of privacy, surveillance, safety, security, freedom, oversight, accountability, etc. Snowden obviously valued some of these over others and acted accordingly. Those who disagree likely value other values more. That’s understandable. What we choose as a society is a product of these disagreements. If we ever have an Orewellian state, it is because we ultimately “agreed” to it.

          • Confucius

            Yes.

          • ex-expat

            You make some good points, but I am with Dave on this one. My main issues are that he released things that had nothing to do with NSA spying on American civilians. Talking about American spying on foreign governments – what good can that possibly do? In addition, he already claims to have “won,” so why continue to release documents? The NSA also made public the communication between Snowden and relevant authorities and there was I believe a total of one or two emails that were very vague. And that broadcast on Russian TV with Putin was just ridiculous.

          • Kai

            That’s fine. Like I said, I think there are valid criticisms of him and his actions.

            He said he “won” in a metaphorical sense, in that he has gotten the world and especially the American public to care about and scrutinize what the government is doing. I think he’s releasing documents in the interest of providing the public with information he feels they need to know.

            I specifically said he said he reported his concerns to officials, because frankly, I can see how that can be a hearsay sort of situation. I’d be hesitant about how both he and the NSA represent the situation because neither can be counted on to be objective.

            Overall, again, I think how someone concludes whether Snowden’s actions was a net good or a net bad reflects their priority of values. Ideally, people can discuss him without making it a black or white issue.

          • Dr Sun

            Personally Kai, I think he is a Hero that exposed the out of control mentality of the U.S secret police agencies.

          • Dr Sun

            so what you are saying is that its Ok for the USA’S, NSA to spy on you, hack into anyone’s computer anywhere in the world, spy on foreign corporations, foreign politicians, basically to every and anyone, even if it breaks INTERNATIONAL LAW and the laws of many countries ?
            But then on another thread you bitch China does the same

          • Confucius

            You make a very tenuous argument. The accusations of gross overreach into person privacy by the NSA have been around for more than 20 years but no one could prove it so there had been no change. Out comes Snowden and within a year the US is moving to curtail their spying – although apparently it is still alright to lie to Congress as the director f NSA blatantly did. You also argue that every country spies, therefore it isn’t a problem. Well, that’s not what the US says about China and Russia. So, is it a case of do as I say, not as I do? My American friends tell me that there is a lot of debate in the US about the Snowden revelations so clearly there is also a sizeable number who believe he is right. Snowden is clearly a patriot. Whether he is also a traitor I think is a question with more nuances than you can argue on an Internet forum, starting with how you view a whistleblower and where you believe the US constitution trumps the national laws. All said, the guy has balls. Huge wrecking ball-sized ones. Let none ever accuse the guy of having no balls.

          • ex-expat

            I expect all countries to spy on each other to whatever extent they have the power to do so. Where China is different is that it hacks corporations for the theft of intellectual property, which is an extremely unfair business practice.

          • Dr Sun

            you really think only China does this,if so you must be a very naive boy lol

            All countries do it and all corporations do it, no matter where they are from/based.

          • Kai

            “Corporate espionage” is hardly something the Chinese invented or are uniquely engaged in, both now and throughout history.

          • ex-expat

            Were you being condescending (you deleted “It’s called”)? Obviously China didn’t event it, but there it is state sanctioned and state conducted. Government espionage is generally for purposes of national security.

          • Kai

            I edited it because it sounded harsher than I intended. “Hardly” was enough for emphasis.

            I don’t think “state-sanctioned and state-conducted” is accurate. What the Chinese government is more “guilty” of is “forced” tech transfer in exchange for market access than “hacking corporations for theft of intellectual property” as a “business practice”. The Chinese government generally uses their hackers for government “national security” purposes and leaves the companies to do their own hacking if they’re so inclined.

            Don’t get me wrong, there’s tons of intellectual property theft in China, but the notion of Chinese government hackers spending their time hacking foreign companies to steal business secrets or whatever is overstated. There’s way more simple reverse-engineering and copy-pasting.

          • ex-expat

            But, as you know, many companies are state-owned enterprises. You haven’t read the numerous reports and documentation? The following article highlights one of the more comprehensive:

            http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/what-the-mandiant-report-reveals-about-the-future-of-cyber-espionage/

          • Kai

            Yeah, many companies are state-owned enterprises. The issue is what information we have of SOEs engaging in, exploiting, and then benefiting from corporate espionage of intellectual property as carried out by government hackers.

            If an SOE employs a hacker to do corporate espionage, is it doing so on behalf of the state or on behalf of itself as a company engaged in competition? If an SOE engineering company hacks a rival for their presentation plans to a prospective client, is it doing so on behalf of the government of China or simply because it wants to win the contract?

            This is important for determining “state-sanctioned and state-conducted”.

            About Mandiant, I may have read more than you have, including criticisms and hesitations about its analysis (and criticism about those criticisms). Mandiant itself acknowledged the issue I pointed above, that they have no direct evidence of how the data stolen is processed or used, if at all.

            Hackers infiltrate companies and exfiltrate data all the time, often just to say and prove that they did it. What we need to know is how the data is being used and if the entire hack was perpetrated specifically as a “business practice” on behalf of “business”.

            For example, there’s a difference between a government hacking journalism targets for fear of negative reporting and a company using government hackers to hack another company to steal a manufacturing process. There’s a difference between a government hacking another government’s military contractors to steal blueprints for weapons systems and a company using government hackers to hack another company to steal the Colonel’s secret recipe. And these are different from some hacker who simply wanted to hack a target just to know he can, or for shits and giggles.

            Do you follow the distinction I’m trying to communicate here and introduce into this discussion so we can better determine “state-sanctioned and state-conducted”?

            Personally, and as I’ve said before, I think the Chinese government is definitely engaged in cyber espionage, just like other countries are. I also believe Chinese companies engage in corporate espionage, including the use of hackers, again, just as other companies do. What I’m hesitant to fully agree with is your statement here:

            Where China is different is that it [as a government or nation state] hacks corporations for the theft of intellectual property, which is an extremely unfair business practice.

            Clarification added by me to make clear how I interpreted your statement.

            I don’t think hackers on government time are spending so much time hacking foreign intellectual property to help domestic businesses in their businesses. They might, but we have no evidence of it, only assumptions that SOME of the data in terabytes stolen COULD be useful for such mundane competitive business applications. As I said earlier, reverse engineering and simple copy-pasting accounts for far more Chinese intellectual property theft and characterizes Chinese “business practices” far more than “hacking” does, especially hacking by government hackers.

            What I’m trying to back away from is the notion of Chinese companies, SOEs or otherwise, regularly using an army of government-provided hackers to steal intellectual property in order to become more competitive in their industries with the Chinese government looking on and nodding.with approval. The Chinese government has better things to do with its hackers that are closer to its core interests.

        • Nor Bolbe

          You’re an idiot. You could never do what Snowden did.

          • David

            Your right I couldn’t betray my country. I worked in intelligence in the Air Force in the 80’s for 7 years, I did not know anybody who would have considered doing this. When I got out I got an offer to work for the NSA but I had no desire to live in MD (nothing against MD I went to U of M but would never want to live there even if I could have afforded it back then, which I probably could not ave). In response to what Kai said, I was not saying ‘everybody does it’ so doing a bad thing makes it OK. I was saying it is OK so everybody does it. To not do everything you can to protect the citizens of the country you work for is a betrayal of the trust people put in you when you accept the job. What he did cost people their lives. If you don’t believe that you do not know how the release of unfiltered intelligence works. Listen to the lies if it makes you feel better. Nothing you say bothers me in the least, simply shows you do not understand what your saying.

          • Kai

            To not do everything you can to protect the citizens of the country you work for is a betrayal of the trust people put in you when you accept the job.

            Not when the citizens of the country you serve and who give you a job are divided on what is actually necessary and desirable to be done for their protection. That’s the issue here, that people disagree on whether or not these things are “necessary for their protection”. It isn’t black or white, but a spectrum of grey, that constituents ought to have a say in or else it becomes tyranny.

            What he did cost people their lives.

            A lot of things done in this world cost lives. Like you, I’m not saying this makes anything OK. I’m saying this because it is an appeal to emotion, a fallacy. It has no bearing on the “objective value” of his leaks.

            I’m not sure why your last two sentences are so hostile. If you feel I’ve said anything wrong, please go ahead and argue how they are. Don’t just dismiss them as “lies” and accusing me of listening to them because they make me “feel better”. What the heck? What did I say to suggest I want to “feel better” or am trying to “bother” you? I thought I’ve been very civil in this discussion, why are you suddenly getting all up in my face?

          • David

            “A lot of things done in this world cost lives. Like you, I’m not saying
            this makes anything OK. I’m saying this because it is an appeal to
            emotion, a fallacy”

            it would be if I was using it as a justification for disagreeing with him, but I am not. I am saying this as an explanation of consequences of his actions. It was not a benign release of information that hurt nobody and helped everybody. To justify that action you must overcome the good with the bad (in your personal moral relevance). I think many people who support what he did do not truly understand the consequences of his actions. The snowball effect of not only the actual loss of intelligence assets but that we have lost the trust of so many of our allies (no because we spied on them, most countries really could give a crap about that at the highest office) because THEIR intelligence and resources were compromised. So when you weigh what you perceive as “the good” done by this massive disclosure, know that it is almost impossible to accurately fill the scales on the “bad” side. I have no reason other than his word (which means as much to me as any criminal who says ‘I didn’t do it’) to believe he “did everything he could have” to report this to the proper authorities. Many IG (inspector General) offices have said afterwards that they received no warnings from him. Personally I think he complained to his immediate boss, was told to shut up or that they already knew and to shut up and he decided to leak it because he was mad. Their are literally DOZENS of government agencies he could have talked to (including his own congressional representatives that he did not contact) or even if he DID feel there was no other choice he could have leaked some of the info to a newspaper like the NYT who would have investigated and reported it responsibly, not just spill so many secrets out on the internet for every enemy intelligence agency to enjoy.

            BTW that comment was aimed at “Nor Bolbe” who simply called me an idiot, not at you Kai.

          • Kai

            I didn’t say it was “benign release of information that hurt nobody and helped everybody”. I don’t think anyone else did. Characterizing it as such is a straw man.

            To justify an action, you must overcome the bad with the good, yes.

            When you say you feel many people support him because they don’t understand the consequences of his actions, wouldn’t the counterargument (actually, counter-accusation) be that you are not supporting his actions because you “do not truly understand the consequences” of his inaction, or of allowing the government to continue its actions.

            This argument is a dead end in both forms. This is basically calling the person who disagrees with you stupid when it is more a difference of each person’s consideration of the relative values of each good and bad and thus how they offset each other in the final calculation.

            I’ve already said the same thing.

            The thing is, you value the bad (consequences) more than the good (consequences). A lot of people share your perspective. The problem is a lot of people value the good more than the bad and a lot of people share that perspective too. This is what makes the matter a controversy in the first place, the lack of consensus. So the question is, are we just going to call the other side stupid?

            There are certainly pro-Snowden people who haven’t really considered the all the negative consequences of his actions. Articulating them for them is good. What do you do when they still decide his actions were a net good?

            Likewise, there are certainly anti-Snowden people who haven’t really considered the negative consequences of inaction, or the positive conseqences of his actions. There’s snowball effects to factor in too. We can also say it is impossible to accurately fill the scales on the “good” side. What then?

            I think the fairest way to judge Snowden is to simply acknwoledge the consequences of his actions, both desirable and undesirable.

            Personally, I don’t think Snowden meets the definition of being a “traitor”, at least no more than I think the US government (or at least parts of it) has “betrayed” its constituents and their legal rights and protections. I actually think Snowden had good intentions, as did the US government. The latter thinks its actions are for the greater good. So does the former. That’s the problem.

            Re: BTW

            I thought everything after “in response to Kai” was directed at me. Thanks for clearing that up.

          • David

            To be clear, I don’t think saying people are not fully informed is the same as calling them stupid. I think calling them stupid, like the comment above did, is calling them stupid. It is a very complex issue made even more difficult to understand by the fact that most people do not have personal experience with having the responsibility of handling classified information, therefore they do not think about the consequences of its release. They DO have experience with watching movies where the good guy is being kept down by ‘the man’ and he risks his life to release the important information tot he newspaper that will bring down the ‘corrupt administration’. In the movies (and books) it is always black and white (maybe with a little twist at the end). Snowden made the decision that with his own limited knowledge of WHY things were being done, his judgement was superior to those who had much more knowledge as well as decades of experience and the legal right to keep some information classified. Up to and including the President of the United States who certainly knew about it.

          • Kai

            I agree, it isn’t the exact same as calling them stupid. My point is that it can come across that way because it boils down to “if you were fully informed, you’d agree with me”. The natural reaction to that is, “what if I am just as informed but still don’t?” Know what I mean?

            I understand your feeling that people are socialized by pop culture to be biased for “whistleblowers” or “the oppressed” and generally lack experience with the subtleties and nuances of responsibility and consequence when handling sensitive information. This is definitely a good point to bring up in such discussions.

            The argument against this is that it is a very hard sell to demand acquiesence and compliance from people with things that affect them while insisting that they be kept ignorant. Trust only goes so far. Yes, Snowden ultimately had limited knowledge, and he did what he thought right with that limited knowledge. At some point, he has to make a decision because you can ALWAYS say he doesn’t ahve all the information and you can also ALWAYS deny him further information for one reason or another.

            Likewise for discussing this issue with people you feel are inexperienced with handling classified information and/or biased by pop culture notions. You’ll have to do your best to impart upon them the understanding you have of handling classified information and see if that changes their mind. But there will come a point where you’ll be making an argument like: “You’re not Chinese, so you wouldn’t understand.” People hate that sort of argument just as foreigners hate Chinese using that argument. “Why can’t I understand Make me understand. You’re just being lazy. That’s an excuse.” Etc.

            So there is a burden upon those who disagree with Snowden’s actions to convince those who agree that they should disagree. Arguments that, “you wouldn’t understand because you don’t have personal experience handling classified information” aren’t persuasive. So what do you do then?

            Your last two sentences boil down into an argument that superiors are to be fully trusted. One of the very things that define “America” is that superiors are not to be trusted, that power should not be centralized, and that government answers to its people. Of course, this is an ideal, and that in reality, there are compromises, and this is one of them.

          • David

            Listen, of course in the end it is a subjected opinion, I did not really think that needed to be said. OF course I THINK if most people knew what I knew they would agree but I also know that there are plenty of people who have different values than me and place different value on the things that I prioritize. so yes, people can certainly know as much as me (and more) and still think he was right. However, on an anecdotal side note, even of those in this administration (one of the most liberal in history) who have levels of clearance and know EXACTLY what happened and when it happened, and didn’t LIKE the surveillance programs, very few of THEM think what Snowden did was OK and to be admired. Yes, that is anecdotal and does not prove anything but for most of us who are on the outside of this it should signal to use that something is not right.

            Of course people in a superior position need to be held accountable. I don’t trust power as far as I can throw it but people also need to be able to do their jobs without people questioning every decision they make. That is what THEIR superiors are for and ultimately the President is responsible (who is responsible directly to the people). Congress (also directly responsible to the people) also plays a part for oversight of intelligence with their committees. This is why most ‘scandals’ really are not. A few are of course but some are simply party politics. Other than hm saying he tried, I have seen nothing (even reported by the liberal NYT) that shows he was frustrated at every turn to reveal what he felt were illegal activities up the proper chain of command.

            I think he liked the idea of going to this group and showing them everything he had and looking like a hero to them, Just like many other spies in the past who have done it out of sympathy for an idea not for money (you know when one of our intelligence officers spies on us, even when it is for an ally like Israel, we still put them in jail for life). Just my opinion.

          • Kai

            My point doesn’t boil down to saying opinions or values are subjective; it boils down to what arguments are ultimately persuasive, to a point about rhetoric and critical thinking.

            You’ve offered various reasons for your opinion and they are persuasive to you and they can be to others. I’m playing Devil’s Advocate in a way, by challenging each of those reasons in order to make the point that there are good reasons why there is dissent and lack of consensus on this issue.

            My point lies in responding to someone who says something is black NOT by saying it is white but by saying it is GREY. If there is a problem in much of American politics, it’s that people stake out black-or-white positions, either-or positions, right-or-wrong positions, democratic-or-republican positions, liberal-or-conservative positions, ultimately extremist positions that encourage groupthink and “voting” along ideological lines instead of actual reasoning or consideration of the specific circumstance.

          • David

            Fair enough, I can always appreciate being challenged on my beliefs and reasoning.

          • Nor Bolbe

            “Betray” your country? The NSA is treating its own citizens like terrorists. You can only betray your country if you give information to the enemy. Snowden gave information to the US Citizens. To the NSA/US Gov’t its citizens are the enemy.

            You do realize “To not do everything you can to protect the citizens of the country”. That would literally mean putting them in prisons. Because hey, its the safest place there is! They get food, shelter, and protection!

            Also “your” isn’t the same as “you’re”.

          • David

            Well, your last sentence was a valid point.

        • donscarletti

          He betrayed his employer, that’s for sure. He also certainly leaked some things that were harmful to his country’s interests as well, such as the legitimate espionage being conducted by America and its allies. Whether he betrayed his country or not is debateable, since the legitimate stuff he leaked was possibly just caught up in the illegal stuff he tried to expose. You cannot betray something by accident, or through stupidity.

          As for hiding with his country’s enemies, this is possibly just cold war thinking on your part. Sure, Russia is not particularly friendly with America right now, but it is not particularly hostile either. If he had joined Al-Qaeda or Iran or North Korea, then yes, clear cut treason. But Russia is more complex, more of a rival than an enemy, sort of like a more in-your-face offensive version of China.

          • David

            Yes, I served during the cold war, but if you do not think Russia an enemy of the United States enemy then we will simply have to agree to disagree for more reasons than worth discussing on a forum about China. :)

  • KamikaziPilot

    Would have been more entertaining if those rifles were loaded with globs of red paint or dye and then the aunties unloaded on that guy after he surrendered turning him into a bloody mess. Then the crowd would have worked into frenzy, haha.

  • Dr Sun

    preferred their dance to be honest , much more entertaining

    • Don’t Believe the Hype

      what is it about the way Chinese girls dance/act, it always ends up coming off like they want to attract pedophiles

  • Blue

    China lives in the past, and dreams of fairytale futures. The now is only for saving cash, and otherwise unimportant; which is strange considering how tangible they like things to be.

  • vonskippy

    Don’t they have high pressure fire hoses in China?

  • David

    I have to agree with this. I love the last line.

    “1. There’s nothing wrong with plaza dancing, it is just a way of exercising, and quite effective [as exercise] too.

    2. A minority of people next to residential areas affecting the rest of
    other people, is wrong, and should be criticized, but many more middle
    to old aged people are in public plazas, parks, and such areas [not
    affecting residents]. I see a lot of young people also joining in, so
    what is wrong with this?

    3. The [city] planning for leisure spaces for the masses is
    unreasonable, so criticisms should be unanimously aimed at land
    developers, aimed at city planners. Why should the masses fight against
    themselves?

    4. There are a lot of people who disturb others. Those who don’t respect
    traffic regulations, who litter everywhere, who set up barbeque skewer
    stands on the side of the street with thick smoke affecting others…you
    don’t criticize. Land developers stealing your money, your boss docking
    your hard-earned wages…you don’t criticize. Instead you focus only on
    criticizing the elderly, as if you were so heroic.

    5. Those who say elderly people exercising are “remaining evils”
    [of the Cultural Revolution] who should hurry up and die, please ask
    your parents, aunts, uncles, etc. to die first, because it just so
    happens that these generations of “remaining evil” were the ones who
    raised you.

    6. The reason a lot of old people plaza dance is because their children
    are busy working and can’t spend time with them. They are killing time
    and relieving boredom. When you criticize and curse the elderly, first
    think about how much you have cared and provided for your parents’
    waning years and how much filial piety you have lived up to.

    7. Apart from plaza dancing, are there things such as elderly
    scamming/extorting people [with false injury claims] and making
    unreasonable scenes on public transportation? Yes! However, those are a
    minority of elderly people. The media and public
    intellectuals/commentators always just report the negatives of a
    minority of elderly people. But how many kindly elderly people are there
    in this country? How many positive energy [influence] elderly are there
    throughout the country? Why aren’t they reported on? If we put aside
    the elderly altogether, there are N amount of people in society who do
    good things, but why doesn’t the media and public commentators report
    about them? The One Foundation also has problems, but why does the media and public commentators only criticize Chen Guangbiao? Etc.?

    This kind of long-term selectivity in what news/information is
    shown you, is it not also a kind of brainwashing? Have you ever wondered
    why? A flock of people who only know how to spend their days doing
    nothing by cursing and criticizing.

    Let me tell you something:

    “Don’t treat ignorance as personality!!!””

  • mike921

    Ha ha, they have more combat experience than the PLA. The aunties + the chengguan could take Taiwan if they wanted to ;)

    • Chris

      They do for sure, many of them were Red Guards during the Cultural Revolution, some even killed their own parents.

  • diverdude7

    I wonder if the music they were playing was that old song…. ‘Joy to the World’ ?

  • Science Patrol

    This message brought to you by the National Rifle Association.

  • Chris

    Old farts living in the past, strangely enough I rarely hear Chinese youths (under 30 years old) telling me that they hate the Japanese, some did, but usually they were poorly educated people from the countryside of third/fourth tier cities (yes, fourth tier cities exist). Young urban Chinese with a decent education, access to (uncensored using a VPN) internet and other points of view than that of the CCP are buying Japanese electronic, cultural products, watching Japanese animes and dramas (along with Koreans’), some even dream to travel in Japan, …

    The old Chinese? There’s no hope to ever change them, they have been brainwashed to hate Japan long before the internet appeared, let’s just hope that they remain insignificants until their death and don’t start a war between both countries that could (and will) escalate to a world war.

    As for the CCP it’s clear that they are only using the hate of Japan to mask inner problems such as corruption, debt rising, pollution or inequalities. The same about Taiwan.

    • 白色纯棉小裤裤

      If you look at the photos of the anti-japan protest in 2012, you will notice that most of the people are youths. We do hate Japan and the Japanese people who deny history and/or hate China. It’s not because of CCP’s brainwashing, actually, CCP have done a poor job at brainwashing and nobody give a fuck about CCTV/the text books. We hate japan because today most of us have access to the internet and free information, so we can see the true face of Japanese right wing politicians. In the translated comments from many Japanese netizens, we also find out what some paper medias tried to make us to believe is a lie – “Japanese people are all polite and civilized”. Many Japanese netizens hate China, and their comments about China are the worst kind of crap I have ever seem. Also the internet gives us some real information about the old war. We see the barbarity of Japanese soldiers in the photos of they smiling at civilian’s bodies, bayoneting babies for fun, raping girls and stabbing objects into their vaginas which we would have never seem without the internet. We therefore know that the anti-japan war was not some comedy portrayed by the TV series, but a real hell on earth.

      • vonskippy

        Hello? The 1940’s called and left a message for you – the message was: “GET OVER IT ALREADY, TIMES HAVE CHANGED, STOP LIVING & THINKING IN THE PAST”.

        • 白色纯棉小裤裤

          Hate Japan = living in the past?
          So where are those people who hate China living?

      • bang2tang

        yeah, you guys also done worst kind of crap to your own.

        • 白色纯棉小裤裤

          like killing infants for fun? No.

  • Kai

    No, it’s the same, though the contexts of your comparison are different.

    “Guizi” added to anything pretty much makes it a pejorative similar to pejoratives like gook, chink, nigger, etc. One thing to celebrate is that the author of the article had the sense to add quotes to it.

    The more politically correct foreign countries would be loathe to use racist pejorative in articles these days, sometimes even in quotes. But there were times when they weren’t so politically correct and use of pejoratives like this did appear in articles.

    China is in a time where they are not nearly as politically correct as many Western countries are. I remember a Chinese commentator for a World Cup game last week remarking about how song and dance are an important part of some African country’s culture while the African team was arriving at the stadium they were to play at and thinking how that would very unlikely be said in America these days. I could only shake my head.

  • Chris

    From my experience in China the further you go from the seat of power the more open minded people are.

    In Guangdong you can’t even feel the influence of the CCP, some young people are dressing according to Tokyo fashion codes and they even play Japanese pop songs in some crowded shops that sell imported Japanese products.

    In Beijing telling that you like Japan can result in a angry mob trying to beat you to death.

    Conclusion: Northern Chinese are dumb.

    • bang2tang

      really? I thought K-pop more popular than J-Pop now, lol

  • Chris

    “It’s China” = shut up stupid laowai.

  • pink panda

    why no girls on this site?

    • bang2tang

      probably more interested to k-pop

  • asiandragons

    Now we get the old aunties, known for their stupidity, gossip and screw up as red guards, doing their thing yet again. I saw the netizens are equally unimpressed by this generation of apparatchiks as I am. They should wear T-shirts with “I am with stupid”…they certainly deserve each other. These kind of ignorant people are the reason I am leaving this country after 20 years.

  • mr.wiener

    Only because their population is disproportionately large.

  • mr.wiener

    Then look up the photo spread for “American apparel”

  • 白色纯棉小裤裤

    Criticizing the government? No, you are criticizing the Chinese people who hate Japan, you said “they were poorly educated ” and “have been brainwashed” and that’s simply not the truth.

  • Freddi BuBu

    Is there a Facebook page where interested young men can meet these Chinese aunties….? lmao

    • Dr Sun

      Ask our “Tennis-Pro” ex-expat he will know. ;)

  • Surfeit

    I like their big Aladdin swords.

  • Mighty曹

    Even Mao. lol

  • WFH

    I’d love to shoot some Japanese babes with my AK-69…

  • Karze

    If Tibetans do such dances in Tibet against Chinese they will be imprisoned.

  • Karze

    These very aunties of whose generation destroyed the 5000 years of Chinese art, culture, language, history during the Mao mania.

  • David

    I do have to say I am very lucky, I guess. Or ‘aunties’ usually start around 7 and are finished by 9:00 around here and it is never so loud that it disturbs more people than the government announcements on loud speakers, the venders trying to sell stuff or the fireworks here (in fact the freaking fireworks at 5:00 am every Saturday morning is MUCH more of a problem to me).

  • wuju

    OMG, What is this?

  • mike921

    Universal rule – whether hood rats or commies, the bad guys always carry AK’s

Personals @ chinaSMACK - Meet people, make friends, find lovers? Don't be so serious!»