Expired Moldy Bread Given to Hainan Typhoon Disaster Victims

Moldy expired bread distributed to disaster victims as relief supplies in Hainan, China, after a typhoon.

Currently the most discussed article on Chinese web portal NetEase…

From NetEase:

Hainan Officials Admit Disaster Victims Received Expired Bread, Establish Special Investigation Team

CNR.cn Haikou July 21 report — According to a report, today [July 21] at 3pm in the afternoon, the Hainan provincial government held a press conference on the damage suffered by the entire province from the typhoon as well as the typhoon relief efforts.

To help the people in disaster areas get through the current difficulties, the Hainan provincial government has already launched contingency plans [emergency response plans], providing a 900 yuan allowance to villagers whose homes have collapsed from the disaster and have no means of making a living. The Hainan provincial government has also disbursed funds to help residents rebuild their collapsed homes, with the subsidy amounts being 15,000 yuan per household with a collapsed home, and 3000 yuan per household with a damaged home. On the 19th in Wenchang city’s Wengtian town, many villagers reported that the bread [or pastries] they received was actually expired [past date], which the head of the Hainan Provincial Civil Affairs Bureau Miao Jianzhong admitted to at today’s press conference. He had dispatched people to Wenchang to verify this and said the problem that the ordinary common people report was indeed true, that he abhorred this issue, that it was the fault of the Civil Affairs Bureau, that they have already established a special investigation team to thoroughly investigate, will determine responsibility, and make sure those responsible are held accountable.

(Original title: Hainan Officials Admit Disaster Victims Received Expired Bread, Have Already Established Special Investigation Team)

expired-moldy-bread-pastries-given-to-hainan-typhoon-disaster-victims-as-relief-02

expired-moldy-bread-pastries-given-to-hainan-typhoon-disaster-victims-as-relief-03

Comments from NetEase:

小禅师 [网易广西南宁市手机网友]:

They say it is for disaster relief, but it is actually just cleaning out stock.

屠龙术 [网易吉林省长春市网友]:

A photo has been posted on the internet, so they had no choice but to admit it.

人民日报人民日 [网易北京市网友]:

Officials: Doesn’t look like eating it will kill people.

网易广东省深圳市手机网友 ip:112.97.*.*

CNM! If you people had just a tiny bit of humanity, you wouldn’t be able to do this kind of thing!

无敌的精神原子弹 [网易天津市手机网友]:

They’ve never taken the people seriously!

tousong [网易上海市手机网友]:

These government officials are hopeless.

christ840518 [网易广西桂林市网友]:

I’m 24 years old. Every day I go on a website called Lusiwu and then jack off. Does everyone think me doing this is good?

网易江苏省南通市手机网友 ip:61.177.*.*

Sent by the Red Cross?

[Note: China’s Red Cross Society is still suffering a public credibility crisis after a number of controversies including the one involving Guo Meimei.]

ZYE2100 [网易黑龙江省哈尔滨市手机网友]:

Fuck, there sure are a lot of people who want to die.

网易山东省淄博市手机网友 ip:222.175.*.*

Strictly punish [the culprits/those responsible]!

expired-moldy-bread-pastries-given-to-hainan-typhoon-disaster-victims-as-relief-b

expired-moldy-bread-pastries-given-to-hainan-typhoon-disaster-victims-as-relief-c

Comments from NetEase:

网易江西省手机网友 ip:182.108.*.*

When it comes to disaster relief, it is not about what the ordinary common people need, but about what the Red Cross happens to have.

网易山东省济南市网友 ip:60.216.*.*

In the future, When it comes to disaster relief supplies and especially food, whoever distributes them shall be responsible for first using themselves as an example and eating it before giving it to others to eat. Those who agree, give me a ding. Motherfuckers.

网易广东省深圳市网友 [mengxiang35]: (responding to above)

When providing emergency aid/disaster relief to foreign disaster victims, we always give the best we have, but when giving emergency relief to domestic disaster victims, it is always the worst. Don’t blame others for looking down on China. Who would respect a country that doesn’t even treat its own people as people?

hsmzj03 [网易浙江省温州市网友]: (responding to above)

Giving foreigners the best and giving Chinese the worst, just what kind of mentality is this?

网易新加坡手机网友 ip:118.200.*.*

What? Will an investigation be of any use?

未闻慰问微闻维稳 [网易广东省佛山市网友]:

Hmph~ Trying to steal the limelight from our Red Cross distributing cotton blankets as disaster relief in hot weather?
Don’t even think about it!! [Also a pun here with Guo Meimei.]

shouji3328 [网易浙江省杭州市网友]:

Looks like not adding preservatives isn’t a good idea, haha.

网易广东省珠海市手机网友 ip:113.76.*.*

Wrapping myself in a cotton blanket eating expired bread during the hottest part of summer. I actually don’t want to die!

网易安徽省铜陵市手机网友 ip:117.70.*.*

Just how much is this crap that the Red Cross Society uses for disaster relief worth? Is it enough for Meimei to go to Macau once?

poi009999 [网易浙江省温州市网友]:

With the current weather in the south, the ordinary shelf life for bread is at most only 3 days. Those have already been 20 days, truly TMD. I bet it was purchased for cheap, declared [on accounting books/documents] at a high price, and the extra money all pocketed into their own wallets.

This news story is also currently the highest trending hashtag (#Moldy Bread at Disaster Area#) on Chinese social network Sina Weibo.

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  • Mmmm. Looks about as tasty and palatable as a Russian denial….

    • Mighty曹

      Ffilled with artificial flavored Putin (pudding).

      • mr.wiener

        But who wants bread with Moldova it?

        • Mighty曹

          haha!

  • diverdude7

    I thought relief type food was supposed to be like ol Army c-rations. stuff that lasts a long time with no special care. vienna sausages & soda-crackers. tins of beans.

    • Mighty曹

      MRE’s these days are quite tasty.

      • lacompacida

        But that is an American ideas and therefore evil, not used in PRC.

        • mr.wiener

          I suppose the Chinese army would be looking at instant noodles rather than MREs.(an evil Taiwanese~Japanese invention)

          • ninxay

            Ah, MREs – meals rejected by the enemy!

    • mr.wiener

      Yes. like plumpy~nut stuff or high protein dry biscuits. Stuff that can be prepared months or years in advance.

  • Don’t Believe the Hype

    When will these people realize that any attempt to set up a disaster relief fund is better than just bitching about Red Cross/gov’t corruption. This is the same problem we have in the US with healthcare, it is so much easier to criticize than to actually try offering alternatives

    • Ale Jandro

      Nationalization of the Healthcare System, maybe? Oh, sorry I am European…

  • Mighty曹

    The relief must be operating under the motto, “Beggers can’t be choosers”.

    • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

      Or maybe they were hoping to give everyone complementary penicillin.

      • mr.wiener

        heh, I thought that as soon as I saw the picture.

    • mr.wiener

      …Or, “Don”t you know there are children starving in Africa?”.

      • Mighty曹

        My mom really used to tell us that.

  • lacompacida

    In that kind of temperature and humidity, pastries with high sugar content go moldy in about a day. Bread and pastries are poor choice of relief food for that part of the world, especially not adequately packaged ones. That’s why some countries use irradiated food in vacuum sealed thick plastic bags. But that takes preparation, any not suitable for areas where storms are extremely rare.

    • mr.wiener

      Earthquakes? Typhoons? floods? to name but a few. In what year does China not have any of these?
      You are correct though. More thought money and preparation needed.

    • Da didi

      Nah, I live in Sanya which is way hotter and much more humid than the affected areas. buy a loaf of fresh made bread and it’ll last maybe three or four days out of the fridge, in the fridge way longer. But this stuff is the plastic packaged filled with all kinds of crap stuff that you buy at corner stores all over the place in Sanya. They’re not refrigerated and the last forever. I wasn’t even sure they could go moldy before I saw this.

  • Cv

    I disagree with the post giving the foreigners the best in China, we are far from getting the best in China. We pay high price for good things and for our shit. Many times i never got the best so i pay for the best now. Want get things in life you have to pay high price for them. Giving Chinese this kind of bread is awful but it seems like they do not care in the first place. Soooooooo

    • Paul Schoe

      they are not referring to what foreigners get in China, but to the support that China’s sends abroad when an emergency happens in another country.

      • Cv

        I know this, i mean look at the Chinese comments above. I am referring too the Chinese comments. What one said.

        • ninxay

          Doesn’t make much sense because China’s foreign aid spending is tiny. Before considering malice, don’t leave out stupidity: I think the mouldy bread was caused by a logistics mixup in a warehouse somewhere. Bread like that has tons of preservatives inside so it won’t go bad for weeks.

          • Paul Schoe

            Ninxay: I guess you are right. In China there often is no malice in such situations. People in China do things without thinking. They move boxes, without checking what it says on the box or what it is for.
            They are not aware (and mostly not interested) that they are part of a bigger system; in this case: emergency relief , and what the system is supposed to do. They only think about the task to move boxes from A to B. Hence: such logistics mistakes.

            As far as the foreign aid is concerned. I doubt if there are many Chinese who have any idea about how much foreign aid is being given (or received!!). It is not the quantity that counts it is the impression that China helps. In this case that creates a perception that China helps other countries and gives their own people rotten bread.

      • Cv

        hsmzj03 [网易浙江省温州市网友]: (responding to above)

        Giving foreigners the best and giving Chinese the worst, just what kind of mentality is this?

        I am talking about this……..

      • Surfeit

        LOL ‘abroad’.

      • Rick in China

        I want to know what situations they’re referring to though, because it sounds like another nonsensical bullshit myth. Like, um, Typhoon Haiyan in the Philipines, I believe the headlines were “China gives less than Ikea” — the best? IN WHAT WORLD?

        • Paul Schoe

          Common Rick. “want to know what situations they’re referring to“? Isn’t that what we all want?
          In discussions, when reading comments, just during conversations?

          With your experience, you know that the fast majority of comments, are just that; comments. Without any backing up by numbers, without logical reasoning.

          When asking about any background information, it usually starts with amazement that somebody asks for a foundation, that somebody is really interested in what they were saying.
          And then, one of two things happen:
          – either there is no answer, or,
          – when you ask again, it is all due to the Chinese situation or mind-set that you, as a foreigner, cannot understand.
          If, instead of giving up, you go one step further and ask again, because you are seriously interested, then you are seen as an arrogant laowei who has ‘no idea‘ about China.

          ‘Wanting to know what they are referring too’ sounds way too naive from somebody with your experience. In my experience, most of them do not refer to information or facts but only to underbelly feelings.
          (and because in China nothing is being questioned, among themselves, they easily get away with this. Nobody will ask them: “why?” or “how do you know?” or “where did you read that?”),

          • Kai

            Don’t take this the wrong way but, with your guys’ experience, presuming you guys are long-time readers of cS (and other English sites about China), you guys should have SOME idea of what they are thinking of and referring to when they make such comments.

            Now, to be doubly clear, you shouldn’t take their claims at face value because there is often exaggeration if not hyperbole, but you guys should know why a lot of Chinese people often feel they get the short end of the stick. Because it is often very true. Because there is often preferential treatment for foreigners in China, in both goods and services. Because the Chinese government does care about international image and does donate humanitarian aid in disasters. Because at the same time, there is always something lacking and people who are in need in China. Because there are so many instances of the Chinese government or people doing less than right by their own people when their own people are relying on them.

            What makes many of these comments idiotic and the people behind them idiots is that while they are based on some truth, they are also based on a number of fallacies, generalizing on misleading vividness, on confirmation bias, and on prejudice.

          • Paul Schoe

            Point taken, Kai, and your comments about a preferential treatment of foreigners (in general) is without doubt correct.

            But I disagree that I often have SOME idea of what the Chinese are thinking and the main reason for this is that they often seem to have no idea themselves.

            It has been extreme frustrating that in the fast majority of cases, you cannot argue a single serious point with Chinese people. The moment that you start asking for facts, numbers or a simple ‘why?’, they feel attacked and hide behind a “foreigners cannot understand Chinese“.

            Following their discussions, you find out that even among themselves they do not debate opinions with facts or information. To them, all that is printed can be lies, so nobody knows the real truth and therefor everybody seems to accept whatever opinion another person has about a topic.

            Of course this is an exaggeration, but it is surprising how with people in every other culture that i have experience with, you can discuss and debate, while in China more often then not:

            a) people are not used to form opinions based on facts (they do not know why they have or express a certain opinion),
            b) people feel attacked when foreigners are genuinely interested, want to know more and ask where they got their information from.

            So part of the ’empathy-attitude’ that I have developed in China is a ‘don’t-ask-further-even-when-you-are-interested attitude‘ as instead of clarification and getting closer to each other, it creates confusion and distance.

          • Kai

            I thought you demonstrated you had some idea of what the Chinese are thinking with your earlier comment.

            I agree that you and others may not always know what the Chinese are thinking and I agree that often the Chinese don’t even know what they’re thinking but vocalizing some knee-jerk emotion or bullshit they haven’t really thought about.

            What I was trying to say is that I generally expect people who have been in China a long time and have read sites like cS for a long time to have SOME sense of what underpins certain grievances or beliefs that some Chinese people notoriously have. When they come across as flabberghasted feigning ignorance of the many possible reasons a Chinese person might feel a certain way, then that strikes me as a bit dishonest. Do you understand what I mean?

            It has been extreme frustrating that in the fast majority of cases, you cannot argue a single serious point with Chinese people. The moment that you start asking for facts, numbers or a simple ‘why?’, they feel attacked and hide behind a “foreigners cannot understand Chinese”.

            I understand that frustration and I’ve experienced at times too though I think I have much more fruitful discussions with Chinese people the vast majority of the time because I may be approaching contentious issues with more tact. I don’t know every instance you’ve experience and how they unfolded, and I believe there are definitely some idiots who dismiss you without even hearing you out, but the fact that some people can have fruitful conversations means that the fruitfulness of the conversation is not determined just by one party being Chinese. I hope you agree with this.

            Following their discussions, you find out that even among themselves they do not debate opinions with facts or information. To them, all that is printed can be lies, so nobody knows the real truth and therefor everybody seems to accept whatever opinion another person has about a topic.

            Yeah, as you said, this is an exaggeration. cS is a great example of how Chinese people do debate among themselves, sometimes even with with facts and information! :)

            Of course this is an exaggeration, but it is surprising how with people in every other culture that i have experience with, you can discuss and debate, while in China more often then not:

            I think this is an exaggeration as well. I’ve run into bone-headed people everywhere. I understand however you’re voicing your frustration with your misleadingly vivid experiences in China.

            So part of the ’empathy-attitude’ that I have developed in China is a ‘don’t-ask-further-even-when-you-are-interested attitude’ as instead of clarification and getting closer to each other, it creates confusion and distance.

            I understsand you having given up. I’d still wager that it has much to do with approach and context as well as tact and sensitivity. Sometimes it’s about asking open-ended questions instead of accusations and criticisms phrased in question form. Sometimes it’s about earning trust by demonstrating humility and vulnerability first (offering criticisms or examples from one’s own home country or identities). When you bash yourself, people often get uncomfortable and try to balance it out by volunteering how they aren’t perfect either. There are so many ways to more effectively get people to open up and share their thoughts.

            Look at the comments section on cS. Here we have a lot of cross-cultural people who are reasonably fluent in English who can offer insights if questions are sincerely asked. Instead, we see more arguably prejudiced judgements and criticisms being made than sincere questions evidencing a genuine interest in understanding.

          • Paul Schoe

            Wow Kai, you have become really judgemental in this reply.

            Luckily I do not think that any of my Chinese friends and acquaintances would recognise me in the description that you give. I would almost see myself as a prejudgemental redneck instead of the person who is sought for for building bridges by Chinese and laowei alike.

            To me the issue is largely depending to the circles in which you move around. When you move in an academic environment, you get, of course, a different response then when you deal mainly with white or blue collar workers.

            Of course you find bone-headed people in every culture, but bone-headed people often have an opinion and keep defending that. They have thought about it, and keep having that opinion, no matter the facts.
            What I find characteristic for many Chinese is that they often say things without really having an opinion. Their statements are baseless, and because of that, they also can’t or won’t defend them. Opinions are annecdotes, easily changed and certainly not worth defending.

            Since it has always been my interest to find out what motivates people, I have indeed given up. But I didn’t give up what you expected or suggest. In general, I have given up giving my own opinion.
            My empathy over here has developed into an attitude where I only show interest in the other person, as that seems to be the only way to get more information and more insight. Here in China, presenting conflicting positions ends a discussion more often then that it deepens it.

            Chinese people are not used that other people are genuinely interested in them, in what they do, and what they think. Ask somebody what type of work he/she does, and she/he will say for which organization they work. When you tell them that you are interested in what they themselves do in such that organization, they are surprised and are often not used to answering that.
            On that question (what type of work do you do?), here I get the answer: I work for Philips, or for the University or i work in a trading company. In other countries I get as an answer: I am an accountant, or a sales-person or a concierge.

            The benefit of asking more questions is that after their initial surprise and not knowing how to respond, people feel connected, they have shared something with you and that makes you part of their ‘circle’.

            Getting information by presenting a counter-opinion or challenging questions, which I often do with non-Chinese, is apparently seen as confrontational and stops discussions rather then that it create familiarity with each other. So I have given up on that. No critical questions in China until we are good friends.
            Coming from a country where debating is treasured, that is a pity. But for creating friends, it works here very well.

            (In my country this attitude would not be accepted as we would consider such a person as somebody who takes info but does not give info. A ‘user’ in other words. (= not friend worthy, he doesn’t give, he only takes). Here it works the other way: with my questions, I am seen as somebody who is personally interested. Unfortunately that still doesn’t make me a person who easily understands why Chinese sometimes say certain things. I can second quess, but I don’t know for sure,)

          • Kai

            I’m sorry you felt judged. I wasn’t trying to be judgemental. I tried to make clear that I empathize with your frustrations and that I don’t know how your interactions unfolded so what I suspect to be reasons based on my own experiences and observations of others may not apply to your experiences at all. I apologize for any inadvertent offense I caused.

            Luckily I do not think that any of my Chinese friends and acquaintances would recognise me in the description that you give. I would almost see myself as a prejudgemental redneck instead of the person who is sought for for building bridges by Chinese and laowei alike.

            I’m not seeing where I’ve described a prejudgemental redneck.

            To me the issue is largely depending to the circles in which you move around. When you move in an academic environment, you get, of course, a different response then when you deal mainly with white or blue collar workers.

            Yes, often true.

            What I find characteristic for many Chinese is that they often say things without really having an opinion. Their statements are baseless, and because of that, they also can’t or won’t defend them. Opinions are annecdotes, easily changed and certainly not worth defending.

            One difference between us is that I don’t find this characteristic unique to the Chinese. I’m not saying you’re wrong, it’s just that I don’t see it as unique or more prevalent in Chinese than others as far as distribution in socio-economic class and education. I hope you don’t find it disagreeable that I notice the same things outside of Chinese people.

            But I didn’t give up what you expected or suggest. In general, I have given up giving my own opinion.

            Yes, I thought you had given up on trying to have a fruitful discussion with Chinese people on certain things, but you’re saying you’ve just given up on giving your own opinion on things. Thank you for correcting me and clarifying.

            My empathy over here has developed into an attitude where I only show interest in the other person, as that seems to be the only way to get more information and more insight. Here in China, presenting conflicting positions ends a discussion more often then that it deepens it.

            This echoes what I said: “Sometimes it’s about asking open-ended questions instead of accusations and criticisms phrased in question form.” Showing interest in the other as opposed to volunteering your own opinion is definitely an effective way to get people to offer more information and insight, and reliably more effective than presenting a conflicting position. I had hoped this sentiment had come across from my previous comment.

            Chinese people are not used that other people are genuinely interested in them, in what they do, and what they think. Ask somebody what type of work he/she does, and she/he will say for which organization they work. When you tell them that you are interested in what they themselves do in such that organization, they are surprised and are often not used to answering that.
            On that question (what type of work do you do?), here I get the answer: I work for Philips, or for the University or i work in a trading company. In other countries I get as an answer: I am an accountant, or a sales-person or a concierge.

            Really? I haven’t experienced this. I haven’t noticed any real differences between Chinese and other nationalities with regards to how often they cite their employer versus their job title when asked such questions.

            The benefit of asking more questions is that after their initial surprise and not knowing how to respond, people feel connected, they have shared something with you and that makes you part of their ‘circle’.

            Agree, I’ve said as much here and in past comments, that rapport and trust must be built to get deeper conversations and discussions.

            Getting information by presenting a counter-opinion or challenging questions, which I often do with non-Chinese, is apparently seen as confrontational and stops discussions rather then that it create familiarity with each other. So I have given up on that. No critical questions in China until we are good friends.
            Coming from a country where debating is treasured, that is a pity. But for creating friends, it works here very well.

            My only disagreement here is that I think (immediately before rapport and trust is built) presenting a counter-opinion or challenging questions is often seen as confrontational and stops discussions with many non-Chinese people as well. Don’t misunderstand me, I do feel a lot of other countries and societies have general norms that are different from China with regards to how confrontation, dissent, and debate are interpreted and responded to. For example, we could argue Western parents generalized may be more amenable to being questioned by their children than Asian parents are because of the relative differences in values socialized into them over time. Please don’t misunderstand me as denying there are differences. I just feel they aren’t as stark as you may be presenting them. Ultimately, every individual interaction has to be judged on its own.

            Again, I apologize if you felt I was judging you. I hope you better understand what I was saying and that I was offering my read and suggestions based on my own experiences and observations of pitfalls so many others have fallen into. Your comments reflect a lot of thoughtfulness and I really appreciate you sharing your thoughts with me.

          • Paul Schoe

            Kai, I do not disagree with your observations of foreigners who criticise the hell about China and yet decide to stay instead of leave. There is a great website (http://laowaicomics.com/) that captures much of what you said in very humorous comics. Particularly the older ones are very to the point.

            Yet, your comments showed how difficult it is not to confuse general observations with judging individual posters. These posts are by definition only a small excerpt of a person. Take many posts of a person together, and you get a picture, but it are still only a few still-shots compared to the variety of the movie of a person’s real life and behavior.
            All of us may be surprised, positively or negatively, when we see the real day to day behavior of the people we know from CS. it might differ a lot from the impression that we got.

            So no hard feelings from my side. Yet I felt compelled to react to your ‘red-neck description’ (even though you didn’t use that term ;-)), so thanks for reading that.

            We’ll meet again, and continue to form our opinions about each other ;-)

          • Kai

            Take many posts of a person together, and you get a picture, but it are still only a few still-shots compared to the variety of the movie of a person’s real life and behavior.

            Yes, I agree, and that’s why I often consciously specify that my observations are of a person’s behavior on this site.

            So no hard feelings from my side. Yet I felt compelled to react to your ‘red-neck description’ (even though you didn’t use that term ;-)), so thanks for reading that.

            I’m still confused by what aspect of what I wrote describes a “redneck”. I didn’t think I was describing a “redneck” as far as I understand the behaviors usually associated with the label “redneck”.

            Cheers.

      • donscarletti

        Which is amazing, because China does not actually give foreign aid. Or at least it gives far less in gross dollar figures than such great economies such as New Zeland, Finland and Greece (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_governments_by_development_aid)

        I have no idea why the government falsly claims to give foreign aid when the people at large don’t even agree with the policy.

        Also of note, China is a receiver of Official Development Assistance and received 600 million in 2005 (the only year I could casually find information for).

      • Zappa Frank

        that is not even that much, as for Philippines.

  • JabroniZamboni

    Kfc Nuggets are looking good right now.

  • Alphy

    This is most likely just some mismanagement in logistic, and not deliberate attempt to skim money. Anyways the government has lost its trust from the public, there’s not much they can do to regain it especially with the non ending waves of scandals and corruption stories. Until the CCP either develop separation of power, apply case law, and/or allows a second party to share power these systemic problems in the government will not go away.

    • Rick in China

      “This is most likely just some mismanagement in logistic, and not deliberate attempt to skim money.”

      I *highly* disagree with that assumption.. this type of stuff happens all the time intentionally, purely to save cash.

      • Ryo Saeba

        I doubt they would intentionally send already moldy bread. It was probably still good when they packed it but mold loves warm, dark, moist places and probably grew in the day or two that it took to get there.

        Granted, they could of used fresh bread but this is China after all and saving pennies is what they love to do. Besides, I’ve eaten bread that is past the “due date” and never gotten sick. As long as there are no mold you can see growing, they’re still ok to consume. May not taste the best but sometimes, a PJ sandwich at 2am will hit the spot, even with minor stale bread.

        • Rick in China

          Yeah – I agree they probably didn’t intentionally send moldy bread, like, didn’t see the mold on it etc – but I’m betting they knew it was expired, and were just thinking “Meh it’s not THAT expired” and figured on saving cash. Just an assumption.

          Regarding the mold issue though, I used to think as you did – that ‘as long as there are no mold you can see growing’ lines of thinking – and found out it’s actually very wrong (from a biologist). The mold you see is just surface spores for reproduction – *IF* you see mold, it means that shit has roots throughout the food..and simply cutting it away is insufficient in most cases.

          The USDA has a chart on which foods you can eat when they’re moldy and which you should absolutely throw out, and baked goods/breads are in the ‘throw it out’ list. Hard cheese/meats/etc can be moldy on surface, and some other things….

          • Ryo Saeba

            I think you misunderstood. I would never cut away moldy bread and consume the rest. I mean if I don’t see mold on it, then it’s still safe to eat. I don’t always eat them because sometimes, they become too stale. If I see mold, even a little spec of green, the whole bag is in the trash.

            I also keep my bread refrigerated and it stays mold free for about a week or 2 past the “due date.” Even if it’s mold free after 2 weeks, it doesn’t taste as good any more so I usually just throw it away anyway.

          • Rick in China

            Yeah.. bread quickly loses its appeal when it’s old :P mold or not.

          • Ryo Saeba

            Also, I wanted to add that mold CAN appear even before the due dates. It is summer after all so every single one of those little package is like a petri dish. There’s food, there’s water, there’s heat, and it’s dark. Perfect breeding ground for mold and bacteria.

        • Da didi

          I’m not sure whether the sell by dates in Chinese supermarkets are from when they were produced or when they’ve gone off, but I rarely find things in date even in supermarkets.

          • David

            They use the date it is produced. I find this strange because the average person does not know how long their milk, bread, honey or canned ham has before it is no good.

          • Kai

            I’ve been in China for many years and I still find the “use by” dates on some goods here less reliable than the States.

  • These bread represents the corrupting influence of modernity. You can’t rely on it, it’s not always good for you, it can corrupt others if you place everything in close proximity, and it feeds on others just like what mold does. I coin this term moldernity.

    • mr.wiener

      Yer a fungi.

      • Wows

        fungus*

        • David

          as in “you’re a fun guy”

      • Da didi

        There’s not mushroom for anymore puns here.

  • Science Patrol

    Provided by Yum Foods.

  • YourSupremeCommander

    Now you know for sure it aint made with preservatives. So what’s the problem?

    • Surfeit

      I think it was, but has been left for a really long time.

  • Tie Ridge

    What the hell is the problem .. The U.S. lets Bread stores an food stores sale the outdated food. YES for Money.. So this is nothing they also stock pile cheese so every 5 or 10 years they will bring it out an sale this old food to the poor also. So join the club China.

  • Zebadee

    Is it any wonder all the top leaders in China eat food only imported from other countries? God bless America and Japan … the saviours of the CCP!

    • YourSupremeCommander

      Pic or it never happened.

    • whuddyasack

      Please, let’s not put America on the same level as Japan. I can accept the fact that Japanese food is of a safe quality, as to date I’ve not heard of any issues regarding Japanese imports. After the McDonald’s food scandal, and the contradictory image they try to project, i.e. safe, clean food you’d have to be utterly shameless to claim American food is safe in China. The quality is horrible, and Americans export GMO food to China that wouldn’t be accepted anywhere else. Then again, you’re that POS guy aren’t you? Funny how you come across as a homie style jihad fanatic.

  • James in China

    I’d love to see a list of who China gives foreign aid to and how much they give…

  • James in China

    I’d love to see a list of who China gives foreign aid to and how much they give…

  • Irvin

    China should just import all its food since no one trust local food anyway.

    • Rick in China

      Yes, the hundreds of millions of migrant workers in China can afford imported food, good idea!

  • Boris

    So is the theme food related now?

    • Irvin

      It’s mold related.

  • jackk

    glorious china & it’s donations… never again

  • Sydney Ma

    Hainanese or Chinese depending on what fit them at the moment, looking down on Mainlanders, but waving the Chinese flag when they need aid from Beijing, idiots. On the other hand food safety is worsening.

  • Mighty曹

    So hungary I can eat a whole Turkey.

    • mr.wiener

      Don’t like Turkey, too much Greece.

      • Mighty曹

        I don’t care. I’ll have one Togo.

  • MeiDaxia

    What’s with the masturbation guy? Maybe I missed that joke…

    • Kai

      It’s probably spam, but sometimes such spam comments get upvoted because enough netizens find it amusing.

  • shah8

    Specifically, I think it’s the schoolbus tragedy that really highlighted it. While Chinese kids drowned, kids way over in the Balkans get nice and safe schoolbuses from the Chinese state.

  • It is a good sign that mould can grow on that bread, it is a sign that there are not too many preservatives in that bread, for which we should be grateful. I remember a story in Hong Kong Apple Daily a few years ago, someone who bought a hamburger from a restaurant of a well known american hamburger chain and left it in their room for a year. Nothing grew on it, which to me is more dangerous than being served bread that can grow mould. At least you can see the mould, you can not see all the chemicals that they put in bread. That mould won’t do you much harm, offensive as it is to the senses. But the toxic chemicals in our food and in polluted environment give us cancer, reduce male sperm count and damage your genes and your brain, especially if you are a child. You can’t smell or see them, but they are far more dangerous to your health than mouldy bread ever will be. Be grateful if your bread can grow mould, or if your vegetables have insect bites.

    • Rick in China

      Are you seriously that fucking stupid?

      You don’t know what bacteria resides in your mould, do you? There may be more common forms, and may be more harmful forms of bacteria brewing. Certain foods grow more harmful bacteria than others in certain conditions.

      Let me present a simple experiment to perhaps clarify this for you:
      – You can eat one burger with live bacteria growing upon it, of which may contain harmful living bacteria that will with very high likelihood give you a potentially fatal bacterial infection.
      – You can eat one burger with little to no harmful bacteria growing upon it, however, it may contain some chemicals which while deemed food safe and edible in certain quantities by the FDA, have correlative or high-dose links to cancer or low sperm count.

      Everything is claimed to be linked to cancer in some way you fucking monkey. Everything causes sperm count issues – wearing tight underwear OMG, having warmer genitals, fucking, eating pop tarts, having a cell phone in your pocket, OMG SPERM COUNT AND CANCER FEAR FEAR FEAR. Your entire post is not based on science, but paranoid ridiculous bullshit nonsense and HOPEFULLY nobody listens to your shit, but rather, listens to the FDA instead, and doesn’t eat the mouldy bread you think is so wonderful. You can go ahead and eat all the mycotoxins you want, but please STOP spreading your horribly dangerous advice to other people.

      • Well, I don’t normally reply to people who use expletives but I’ll ignore this time, no I am not stupid, and last time I checked, I was not a monkey, and I have done a lot of research on issues which are way more important than this. How often do you hear that someone’s health was permanently damaged because they ate mouldy bread? Whereas every kid’s health is permanently damaged by growing up in an environment as polluted as China. I keep seeing all these posts about relatively trivial health issues, and wish people would pay attention to the really dangerous health issues, like airborne heavy metal which causes permanent brain damage to kids growing up in China, even if they are conceived after their mother has left China, because the lead in the environment is absorbed into the bones of women in China and released slowly, contaminating their blood even after they leave China. No one would eat mould if they saw it on bread, and even if they did accidentally eat a little, they probably would not get very sick. Whereas lead and other heavy metals are invisible, kids breathe is all day long, they put their fingers in their mouths which have dust on them on them and the damage to their brains is permanent. It’s what you can’t see which really harms your health.

        It’s different to eating rotten meat. As you say, different organisms live in different environments, and as far as I know mold which grows on vegetables or grain is different to bacteria which rot meat. In fact, we do eat mouldy food sometimes, for example blue cheese. If I’m not mistake, beer and wine are also produced by decomposition of vegetation through mould-like yeast. And penicillin was originally discovered growing in mould, so it can have medicinal properties.

        Yes you are right, the environment is full of carcinogens and there is no point worrying about it too much, because most of the time your body will fix it’s DNA, and if it doesn’t, well you have to die sooner or later. But when your kid’s intelligence is permanently reduced, because they have been brought up where the air that has up to 20 times more heavy metal than the US, then that is really bad.

      • bujiebuke

        Oh Rick you silly little monkey… bacteria is not mold. Where do you suppose mycotoxins comes from?

        Mendacius: Eating moldy food is not OK. You can get permanent neurological damage from it.

  • Master777

    This is what happens when officials pocket all the money and spend it on hookers like Gou MeiMei. Shame on the corrupt officials.

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