Xinjiang Netizens React to Kunming Knife Attack Public Backlash

Bloodstain on the floor of Kunming Train Station.

From Sina Weibo:

#I am Xinjiangnese#

I am Xinjiangnese, as well as amongst the innocent people. The people here are both hardworking and kind, so please don’t blindly make us out to be dissidents/outsiders [enemies]. We have also experienced pain and sorrow, so at this moment are also deeply heartbroken. I pray for Kunming. May the deceased rest in peace, and the living stay strong.

Comments from Sina Weibo:

南山初雪:

Please don’t label our Xinjiang so recklessly. Those evildoers [attackers] have no right to represent our Xinjiang! Those evildoers also do not have the right to represent ethnic Uyghurs! Whatever you do, don’t unload your anger towards other ethnic Uyghurs or Xinjiangnese. Because that’s what the separatists want. The 56 ethnic groups are all family. No matter what ethnicity, good people are the majority!

蜜萝菠萝菠:

This must be said: in Xinjiang, over 260 violent incidents happen every year, but never has there been people saying “Don’t cry, Xinjiang”, or “Stay strong, Xinjiang” [referring to similar Chinese internet memes as words of encouragement and support by netizens around the country for areas that have suffered some sort of major tragedy]. The moment something like this happens to other places in the interior of China there are all sorts of prayers and blessings. Meanwhile, more than 16 million people in Xinjiang are cursed as dog shit along with several violent terrorists. With something so wrong and unfair, we can only say to the people back in our hometowns: Stay strong, Xinjiang! Our big Xinjiang is the best. I have never regretted being born in Xinjiang.

王亚琦_w:

Those who know me, those friends of mine from all around the country, what do you think of me? If you think I’m good, that I’m not a bad person, then please allow me to represent Xinjiang, because this piece of land taught me how to be a person [decent]. I ask that when you are cursing those terrorists to die 10,000 times, scratch the word Xinjiangnese [from your sentences]. Otherwise, our friendship ends here. Thank you, because I hate those murderers more than you do.

金爺想说耶耶耶:

A friend of mine drew this. Isn’t it the truth? 求关注 Hope everything will be fine. 求关注

The comic picture.

[Translation of text in images:]

I AM XINJIANGNESE

Living in the big family that is China, although many people have many misunderstandings, I still feel happy/blessed being with everybody.

The comic picture.

Suddenly, one day

A group of horrible people came. They did a very bloody, and very horrible thing to my friends and brothers. Blood flowed like a river, as tens of thousands of people wailed.

The comic picture.

And I, don’t know what to do.

I see people are hurt, I see that they are in tears. I know my heart aches so much that I can’t even speak.

The comic picture.

“Are you guys okay…?” [With a Xin on his forehead indicated “Xinjiang”]
“Get away! Don’t come near us!”                                            

Turns out, they have mistaken me, mistaken me as also a terrorist.

The comic picture.

“My goal was precisely to divide you all~ Ha ha~ They don’t want you anymore. So, come with me~”

No. Definitely not. I know I won’t compromise.

The comic picture.

“So cruel!”
“Get lost!!”
“Stay away!!”

But… but… why do I get this feeling that… I can never go back…

The comic picture.

Am I really… really a bad guy…? Why is no one willing to believe me… The bad guys are only the minority… only the minority.

I still want… to be with everyone…

The comic picture.

I hope that no more people will get hurt.
That everyone will eventually smile at me, and welcome me back home.

弥野天工:

In recent years, whenever they’re asked about their native birthplace or hometown, every Xinjiangnese out there probably has hesitated a little, but of course in the end we would always say that we are Xinjiangnese. Loud and clear! In other people’s circles, you might be the only one who’s Xinjiangnese. So, in other people’s eyes, you are Xinjiang! Get rid of bad habits, always help other people, always be kind. Every Xinjiangnese is a representative for Xinjiang.

青蛇婊:

Stop cursing Xinjiang.

A text from a Cellphone screenshot.

A text from a Cellphone screenshot.

2009 July 5, some misfortune happened in Xinjiang and the central government immediately cut all of Xinjiang’s communications with the outside world. It really felt like we were isolated.

That year I went traveling in the interior of the country, and no one knew about the riot in Xinjiang. Just like this, we lost countless innocent lives in utter silence.

When earthquakes or riots happen in any other places, everyone cares and prays for them. But when an earthquake happened in Xinjiang, there were even people on the internet saying we deserved it. My heart was so chilled. And like this, we suffered from both natural and human disasters in silence.

How horrifying a future the country faces when the nation is not united. When a country doesn’t have domestic harmony, how can it move against all kinds of other danger?

Rebiya has plotted all of these, and now she has sort of succeeded. You all now dislike us here, and slowly you isolate Xinjiang. The people of the interior [other Chinese] are now all prejudiced against Xinjiang. This vast land, making up 1/6 of China, with so many natural resources, and now she’ll probably get what she wants.

You’ve never seen how beautiful Xinjiang is. You don’t know how splendid the lights shine in the night in our provincial capital. Ignorance is not frightening, but please don’t go around showing off your ignorance.

Shihezi, in this small city developed by the military, Uyghurs are rarely seen. [The city residents’] fathers, and their fathers’ fathers all came from the interior to develop the frontier. Our ancestral homes are also scattered all over the nation, all coming here to build up this land. Why do you think they came here? Now all the people back in our hometowns are cursing those so-called Xinjiangnese.

But they merely represent a small group of people. Back in the “7.5” incident, the number of people who died as reported by CCTV was just the tip of the iceberg. Those who were implicated were all innocent people. See clearly the truth/facts before talking about the issues, okay?

I love Xinjiang.

Mi藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌酱iM:

When adopting a unified approach in reporting the news, wouldn’t it be appropriate to remove the word “Xinjiang”? What are Xinjiang separatist forces exactly? Really, separatist forces are a product of politics; they are not created simply from a region. Xinjiang is a geographic term, the word itself doesn’t have the meaning of separatist forces in it. When watching all the news reports everywhere, every anchorperson intentionally stresses the word Xinjiang while reading from the script.

乔见-付小狒狒:

When you go on campus, you’ll discover: schoolmates from Xinjiang don’t take knives and randomly hack people, neither do Tibetans randomly get into gang fights, schoolmates from Guangdong can also be picky eaters, Shanghainese people can also be easy to get along with, and Beijingers don’t always speak with a bureaucratic tone. We can’t conflate things acting on hearsay generalizing people. It’ll be a tragedy of the Chinese nation if we can only look at this world from what we hear [hearsay and stereotypes]. 拜拜

赞古mama-:

I was born in Urumqi, and raised in Urumqi too, a 100% pure Xinjiang girl. In order to develop the frontier, my grandparents moved out of the big city and sacrificed their precious youth here: Fragrant foods and fruits, rich and fertile resources, an azure blue sky, a warm and passionate people, local customs and traditions, modern cities. If you insist on saying Xinjiang is no good, then I am very sorry. Because you don’t know the virtues and beauty of this land. I am proud of being Xinjiangnese. The mountains and rivers are beautiful here, but the people here are even more beautiful. The great beauty, Xinjiang.

The girl who posted this weibo and pictures.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

A view of Xinjiang's landscape.

Xinjiang food.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

An airport in Xinjiang.

Xinjiang women.

奥利弗晶:

I am Xinjiangnese, but I’m not a thug; just like you are Cantonese, but are not a prostitute. You know what I mean!!! [Alludes to the recent crackdowns on the prostitution industry in Guangdong.

The girl who posted this weibo and picture.

懒猫儿_驴:

I’m currently studying in Urumchi Erdaoqiao. I have many friends who are ethnic minorities, and they are very talented. Those studying design have some very great ideas. In a multi-ethnic/multicultural place like Xinjiang, there are also very different human natures. There are also bad people in the interior [of China] too, but can we curse people of the interior as being scum? No. Because we are all [people of] China.

阿力木江:

I am Xinjiangnese. I wear my ethnic dress. I can speak my Uyghur language. But I’m not a terrorist. My name is Jiang, but I’m no terrorist.

The man who posted this weibo and picture.

AIJIA李润萌:

Stop using words such as Xinjiangnese, or mainlanders. It sounds like whoever are saying these words are not Chinese. Even if there is a tiny group of people doing bad things, we can’t take them for the whole! Xinjiangnese are very good, very frank and open, and very upright.

昌吉王者:

The purpose of those terrorists and separatists is to damage Xinjiang people’s image in people’s hearts nationwide. The purpose is none other than to stir up hate in people nationwide against Xinjiangnese, and then realize their goal of separating Xinjiang. Stay strong, Kunming, Xinjiang is with you. Stay strong, Kunming, together we draw swords against the terrorists! Hello– Kunming and Xinjiang!! Remember, they [the attackers, terrorists] are not Xinjiang, cannot represent Xinjiang, and do not represent any religion or ethnic group! Reshare/forward this on!

I'm Xinjiangnese.

琉璃无殤也无双:

I’m not Xinjiangnese, but I know most Xinjiangnese are good people. Just like us Han people, they love this country deeply. In this great Chinese nation, the 56 ethnic groups are one family and if our Chinese nation were to lose any one ethnic group, we would not be whole… Stay strong, Xinjiang! Stay strong, Kunming!!! 威武蜡烛心

我的男朋友是白羊座Wz偶吧:

I’m not Xinjiangnese, but I won’t go discriminate against Xinjiangnese. I know Xinjiang is very beautiful, and that the people there are also very kind. They were abandoned by our country for 2 years, but have they ever complained? We use their natural gas yet despise them here, are we not ashamed? We are all one nation. People’s hearts can never be the same, but we all know the difference between good and evil.

小超人丶已死:

I also don’t know why people of the interior have such huge and deep prejudice against Xinjiang. Why, my friends? Have you ever set foot onto our Xinjiang? Have your eyes ever beheld our Xinjiang? Because you have never been to Xinjiang, therefore, please don’t criticize our beloved home, don’t use vicious words against our home… Xinjiang, Xinjiang, my home!

The view of a Xinjiang City.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

The view of a Xinjiang City.

A declaration.

[Translation of the words in the picture above: I’m Ding Xiaoman. I live in Xinjiang Urumqi. Xinjiang is a great beauty. I speak for Xinjiang. @Mr. Ding Man]

她的故事她的梦v:

Everyone, please stop defaming/villifying us! In doing so, you are letting that tiny group of people prevail! They are not human! We are Xinjiangnese, and we are children of China, same as you are.

The girl who posted this weibo and picture.

Forever_君毅王:

If you are a friend! Our hearts will be as clear as the water in Kanas Lake! If you are a friend! Our bosom will be as broad as the Ili Grassland! If you are a friend! Our bodies will protect you from storms like Mount Tianshan! But if you are an enemy, sorry! Our  will be as fierce as overnight Samsa!!

Xinjiang Samsas.

A view of Xinjiang's landscape.

巩梦宇_:

[I’m a] born and raised on mutton Xinjiangnese. That year, there was not a single lit candle [likely referring to netizens on Sina Weibo commonly posting candle emoticons to express sympathy and support after major tragedies], not a single person praying [for Xinjiang’s well-being]. Of course, there also weren’t ignorant abusive words by people either. There were only us, encouraging each other, taking care of each other, terrified, enduring that year without the internet, without communications [with the outside world], and having our blood buried and hidden deep by other people. We also hate the evildoers [thugs, attackers, terrorists], and hate them for ruining our quiet peaceful life. But please hate with rationality.

The girl who posted this weibo and picture.

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  • xuedi

    so cozy here on my xinjiang sofa!

    • Joey

      Your mother is the nation’s sofa.

      • xuedi

        don’t discriminate slutty parents!

  • donscarletti

    Ding for Xinjiang hotties posting PSed selfies to prove a point.

    No idea how it proves it, but they have my sympathetic ear either way.

    • Kai

      I think it’s about putting a face on an identity. It’s easier to talk shit and be venomous about an abstract identity, about some villain conjured up in one’s mind based from the worst news and hearsay stereotypes one knows about that identity, than someone who frankly looks pretty normal and ordinary and maybe even kind and adorable.

      • Taoran

        Don has a point, I find it striking that all the pictures in the article show unusually beautiful women. My theory is that there must have been much more normal ones in the original, but since CS only replicates the most popular/upvoted comments, we only get to see the prettiest ones?

        • Kai

          I had a few humorous responses leap into my head at first:

          1. That Jiang dude isn’t that pretty.

          2. What are you talking about? All Xinjiang people are total babes!

          But seriously, I think it is because of how they were ordered on the Sina Weibo topic (huati) page itself and Peter just translated the ones at the top. So yeah, I wouldn’t be surprised if the babes got more upvotes just cuz they’re pretty. Still doesn’t explain that Jiang dude, but maybe like he says, he’s a good guy and he has a large circle of friends who love and upvoted him.

          Jiang dude is rugged!

          • Markoff

            I liked the jiang dude the most and he has my sympathy, he looked the most authentic, the other girls don’t look Uighur to me at all and are also way too young to have clue what they are talking about unlike the guy.

          • Kai

            I realized later that I got Jiang mixed up with another netizen (the one who appealed to friends who like him), so part of my above comment made no sense whatsoever, lol.

            Except Jiang is rugged. Cuz he has a beard. And people with beards are rugged!

          • niggaplz

            that jiang dude is a chinese celebrity, 阿里木

      • Mateusz82

        Well, a cute female face… that’s the kind that elicits sympathy.

        • Kai

          Wimmin’ n’ dere wily ways!

          • Surfeit

            Bitches be craaaazy!

    • Stefan Xu

      Those are not PSed…

      • Irvin

        Oh yes they are!

        • Stefan Xu

          In what way?

          They’re just wearing make-up and having a photo filter.

          • Markoff

            Because difference between PSing and using photo filter is?

          • Surfeit

            … and we have a WINNER!!

      • donscarletti

        很傻很天真 + too simple, sometimes naive.

  • The FRED FONG

    Confucius say….sofa for girls…and girly men

  • Haruguchi

    God bless Xinjiang. The Han brought this on themselves!

    • YourSupremeCommander

      The Han brought this on themselves!

      Yes

      The same way the Japs bought Fat Man & Little Boy and the tsunami to themselves!

      • hailexiao

        Well at least Fat Man & Little Boy is arguable. Earthquake & tsunami…less so.

      • Markoff

        agree with the bombs, dunno what they did to mother nature except killing dolphins and whales or is it revenge for this?

    • Insomnicide

      Ah yes, just like the Han brought the opium war, the eight nation invasion, the Sino-Japanese war and the unequal treaties upon themselves.

      Where’s the retribution for all those events?

  • Don’t Believe the Hype

    Sadly, it is unlikely that these posts will do much to change the stereotyping in China, whether it be based on ethnicity (tibet, xinjiang), race or background (peasant vs. rich).
    These attitudes are very ingrained amongst average Chinese, especially outside bigger cities but also in them too. Its no coincidence that there is so much homogeny in their thought generally, it is what they are taught at school from day one. I’m not saying these average Chinese are stupid, but they are just not taught to think critically, but to just accept things as inherintly true.

    Fortunately the internet seems to be creating a smidgen of outside voices, maybe that will change some attitudes for future generations.

    • Don’t Believe the Hype

      P.S. I am not Chinese, but this is basically word for word what i have heard from high officials in China who defend their policies. Basically they say that the average chinese person needs to have censurship and should not be allowed to think freely.

  • Eileithyia

    Xinjiang people want independent. It was a conquered land anyway. The Song Dynasty was never able to conquered Xinjiang.

    Xinjiang was rule by a Kingdom call Xi Xia. Then the Mongol empire conquered
    Xi Xia and Xinjiang. The Yuen Dynasty had Xinjiang, but Yuen also had Korean too. Korean doesn’t belong to China.

    The Ming Dynasty never rule Xinjiang.
    Only later, it took the Qing Dynasty like 20 year’s to conquered Xinjiang.

    • YourSupremeCommander

      Native American Indians want their independence, their land was taken by the whites of Europe.

      You agree?

      • Eileithyia

        I agree.

        • Mateusz82

          White man’s burden…yellow man’s burden… same difference.

      • Torgrim

        Actually, us Norwegians would like North American back. You Asians took it from us, then when the Europeans came, they called you Asians “Native Americans”, thinking you had always been there.

        • mr.wiener

          The Sami said they want you off their land by the end of the week.

          • Stefan Xu

            And I said I want you get off the Xbox NOW! :)

          • mr.wiener

            I though we agreed it was my turn?

      • Eurotrash

        Agreed! And the Hawaiians.

    • Insomnicide

      The Han dynasty and the Tang dynasty ruled Xinjiang you uneducated lout.

      The Song dynasty never conquered anything, rather it was the one being conquered.

      Anyway, if Xinjiang people want to be independent then why do these comments claim they’re apart of the big Chinese family? Do you speak for all of Xinjiang?

      • Eileithyia

        YOu can’t be a dynasty without conquered land from another empire/kingdom.

        Xinjiang said it with action them self. This kind of action is happening around the world. Not all Xinjiang people wants Han people out, just alot of them.

        • Kai

          I think you mean you can’t be an “empire” without conquered land? All it takes to be a “dynasty” is succession of rulers from within the same family…

      • Zappa Frank

        of course some xinjiang people claim to be part of china. There is a huge number of han people in xinjiang and even some that say to be Uyghur are mostly of han blood…like the girls in the pictures.

        take the girl that says:

        I was born in Urumqi, and raised in Urumqi too, a 100% pure Xinjiang girl. In order to develop the frontier, my grandparents moved out of the big city and sacrificed their precious youth here

        she can claim to be pure Xinjiang, but according to what she says she is just from colonizers …
        however sure there are also Xinjiang real Uyghur that want to be part of china, like the man in the picture..( well I suspect that one actually is a fake, I’ve seen that pictures elsewhere).

        • linette lee

          From what I understand Xinjiang is like 50% Uyghur and like 40% Hans. The Hans want Xinjiang to be part of China but the Uyghur don’t want to. That can be a big problem. I am sure like any country the terrorists are a small group of Uyghur that rebel againt China gov’t. I wouldn’t label all Uyghur are terrorists.

          • Zappa Frank

            Most of han are arrived in the last 50years, before it was almost 100% uyghurs (or other similar). There is a colonization, settlements, that is going on and apparently it is one of the point that piss off Uyghur, that soon will be a minority…(like Tibetan in Tibet, with the difference that the colonization of xinjiang is faster because lower altitude and better place to live).
            In a certain time most of Uyghur wanted to be independent (not sure now), but they were forced with the army to remain with china.. many escaped passing the border line.

          • Gordon Gogodancer

            50% Uyghur 40% Han?….isn’t it like 95% Han 5% Uyghur?
            You wouldn’t label ALL Uyghur terrorists…..wow, its funny how such an obvious thing needs to be pointed out in China

          • Stefan Xu
          • Kai

            It gets pointed out whenever people are unfairly generalizing so apparently it isn’t as obvious in many places as we’d like.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xinjiang#Demographics

            Apparently as of 2009 for Xinjiang as a whole, it’s ~46% Uyghurs and ~39% Han. There’s little question that Hans are moving in and diluting the demographic makeup of the area. That’s what people say about the US Southwest and Mexicans. What’s also worth noting is the makeup of the individual administrative levels. Urumqi, the big city, for example mostly Han, which can correlate to differences on the socioeconomic ladder between the Han and Uyghurs.

        • AG

          She has green eyes, likely a Uyghur.

          • Zappa Frank

            can’t you see that girl, like all girls in those pictures, has the contact lens that make their eyes ‘bigger’ like almost all Chinese girls have?
            look below for pictures of some real Uyghur..

          • linette lee

            All Chinese girls??? You mean Japanese girls. I never wear color contact in my whole life. Most Chinese girls don’t neither. Is that why? I got asked pretty often if I wear color contacts. You men think all Chinese girls wear them uh?? lol.

          • Zappa Frank

            it was an hyperbole, of course not all, but in mainland china is full of girls with color/bigger contact lens.. often ridicules.. how do you know most Chinese girls don’t? you said you’ve never been to mainland china.. correct?

          • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

            A lot of Asians (Japanese, Chinaese and Koreans) do wear them. They ar quite in fashion. I know a 14 year old kid who wears them. She wakes up espeically early to put them on and even though it hurts she still does it.

          • linette lee
          • hailexiao

            My family is 100% Han Chinese from Sichuan, Chongqing and Hunan, and green & blue eyes are quite common. It’s not all that rare out west.

          • Kai

            While not genetically IMPOSSIBLE IMPOSSIBLE, it may mean you’re not actually 100% 100% Han.

          • Paulos

            @hailexiao:disqus I think we’re getting race and ethnicity mixed up here. “Han”, “Uyghur”, or “Arab” in my case, are social constructs (ethnicity), not a genetic ones (race).

            There has never been a genetically homogeneous ethnicity, and almost every historical attempt to tie these two concepts together has ended heinously.

            The green-eyed woman in the picture is a homo sapiens who belongs to whatever ethnic group she chooses to identify with. Any other classification is arbitrary.

          • Kate

            this might be completely off topic but I just want to point out that race actually has no genetic basis. here’s a short article from pbs, there’s plenty of others if you actually care to look it up.

            http://www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-background-01-x.htm

          • Paulos

            We’re all the same race, homo sapiens. If you’re saying that different ethnicities have no absolute genetic boundaries, you’re right, and I have looked it up.*

            But to say that ethnicity has no genetic basis ignores history. I don’t like it, I don’t agree with it, but the fact is that many ethnic groups have, and continue to define themselves primarily by inherited physical traits.

            http://www.physanth.org/association/position-statements/biological-aspects-of-race/

          • Kai

            Truth.

          • aaron

            i’d like to meet a 100% han chinese that has naturally blue or green eyes. that’d be a first for me.

          • Rick in China

            Yeah – in my 10 years in Sichuan, I’ve seen many green & blue eyed people.

            Every one I’ve seen has been wearing coloured contacts. What the fuck world do you live in, and I’d love to see your family members with their blue eyes…

        • Insomnicide

          Colonizers? Han Chinese have been in Xinjiang since the Han dynasty.

          The Uyghurs came down from the Altay mountains and slaughtered the native inhabitants of Xinjiang and the Han Chinese living there. After the Mongols withered away, the Uyghur dynasties lost their power and the Han Chinese retook the lands. Of course, that doesn’t make Han Chinese people the sole owners of the land. But they are just as native to the region as the Uyghurs who were originally from the regions now known as Kazakhstan.

          • Zappa Frank

            Han Chinese were a minimal presence in Xinjiang before, their actual presence is indeed a colonization. They arrived in mass in recent years.
            It is a nonsense to talk about who ruled there many years ago as justifcation for what happen now, else italy should be justify to rule other the whole Europe. Xinjiang during Han dinasty was a protectorate, not part of the Han empire.
            However this don’t change what happen now.

          • Insomnicide

            Well if you’re going to use the history excuse, then same goes for the Xinjiangese. It’s been regrouped into China since the Qing dynasty. Han Chinese have been moving there since the 1700s. Migration into a region within your country isn’t colonization in the first place, let alone something that’s already happened hundreds of years ago.

          • Zappa Frank

            I don’t use history excuse, I told that is a nonsense talk about how did we get to this situation…
            it may be true that immigration there is something old, I’ve never denied, but only recently ( around ’70s) it has became so massive..in 1953 han presence was just a 7%..

          • Insomnicide

            In 1953 the world only had 3 or 4 billion people. Populations grow, technology advances. Now that Xinjiang becoming more inhabitable, migration will happen regardless of government policy. To call it colonization is not very considerate of the situation, China itself is already crowded since a century ago. People moving around is natural, even the Hukou system can’t stop that completely.

            While i can sympathise that this sudden influx would cause tensions and paranoia, Xinjiang has been integrated as a region of China and they should deal with the problem as a province of China. Separatism is reckless and this kind of violent lashing out by terrorists on random citizens is downright idiotic.

          • Zappa Frank

            I’m not justifying anything and less than never terrorism.
            Giving that, I am just pointing out that for a Uyghur it looks like a colonization, since they passed from about 90% to 50% and forced for many years to get Chinese habits and to suppress Uyghur culture (don’t know now, but happened in the past). They have been integrated by force in the Chinese system, they probably have never considered themselves Chinese in past.. You say is natural people moving around, I know, but I can assure that when are other people that come next to your home this thing get a completely different view..

          • Brian227

            When the government relaxed to restriction on teaching in Uighur, very few parents sent their kids to Uighur-only schools. The bilingual ones were far more popular. I guess people are far more pragmatic about how their children are going to be able to make a living.

          • Markoff

            crowded china is myth, in recent days I posted here calculation of density in china not taking in account xinjiang and tibet and it was less crowded let’s say than UK or France AFAIR and pretty on par with many European countries

          • Paulos

            I understand you’re passionate about the issue, but don’t you think you’re taking a little too much artistic license with this narrative?

            None of the early Central Asian cultures were terribly literary, so we really only have second hand accounts as to how the region developed. Historical bias and pre-Enlightenment methodology don’t help either. We don’t even know who the Xiongnu really were. Many respected scholars claim that they were in fact Turkic.

            Anyway, IMHO historical claims don’t even equate to political legitimacy in the first place. I’m just throwing in my two cents.

        • Guy Fawkes

          No need to be 100% skeptical all the time.
          That Uyghur man, 阿里木 is indeed a little famous as he had appeared on TV in the past for his charity. He continuously donated most of his income from his grilled meat business for the poor so that the children can go to school, regardless of ethnicity.

          http://news.cntv.cn/china/20120203/122702.shtml

          • Kai

            As I said…

    • Rick in China

      Regardless of who is what, the ethnic people who have lived there since antiquity strive for control over their own destiny – whether that’s a minority or majority of them who truly believe that is to be determined…but obviously there is a strong faction, a somewhat justified faction, who demands that self-determination. Various poeple have controlled it doesn’t really mean shit, I mean, the same could be said about most parts of Europe – whether it was greek, roman, byzantine, moors, ottomans, whomever.. the world is a cultural whore that has been pillaged repeatedly by conquerers from all over, the ethnic people who have inhabited lands should have some rights to the same lands they have continually inhabited – moreso than the conquerers who claim they once owned or pillaged that land once long ago regardless of how many years they claim to have held it.

  • Insomnicide

    Shame on the terrorists for ruining lives of ordinary citizens both inside and outside of Xinjiang. But even more shame for those foreigners and expats, especially on CS even cheering on these terrorists!

    • Don’t Believe the Hype

      who are you referring to exactly? I don’t see anyone “cheering on” any terrorists.

      • Insomnicide

        “God bless Xinjiang. The Han brought this on themselves!”

        It’s literally just above your comment.

        • Zappa Frank

          and how do you know he is an expat or a westerner?

        • Markoff

          how is it cheering for terrorists? I just see stating the facts. first sentence is praising Xinjiang and wishing them all the good for their future, 2nd sentence is just stating the fact they really brought this to themself by their behaviour, we could say same about terrorists in US, if US attack and occupy some country for oil/resources and then some guy blow himself and you will say “praise XY country. US brought this to themself” is that cheering terorists? it’s just stating the facts and your sympathy with country of terrorists, but not saying you agree with murdering civillians, the world is not black and white as most of the oversensitive simpletons see it here in discussions

          if someone murder people from my country I may be angry, but still must realize reason why attackers did it. it’s shameful act, but you have to understand why are they doing it

        • Reptilian

          I saw a couple of comments on sina.com saying that a country that doesn’t make its ethnic minorities feel as at home as the ethnic majority will definitely encounter something like this.

          Those comments are akin to “The Han brought this on themselves.” What does the Ministry of Truth (aka Central Propaganda Department) have to say about native Chinese saying stuff like that, Insomnicide? I wanna know, for mental guidance and politically correct (in the China context) thinking.

    • Lord_Helmet

      I don’t know if cheering on the terrorists deserves more shame than the actual, physical act of terrorism. It definitely deserves shame though.
      Don’t be such a lap dog, remember this is the internet, 99% of the fucked up shit people say here they would never say in public.

      • Kai

        True, and yet the internet also influences people’s attitudes and words in real life, so there’s still ample reason to be concerned for online behavior and speech.

        • Lord_Helmet

          Are you using the same study that says violent video games and movies are the reasons for aggressive behavior? For children yes, for adults I would have to disagree. What video game could we use as an excuse for Hitler, there was no world of warcraft, Charles Manson Atari’s Pong???
          I would think this forum is a 20 years old and above age group. Please stop sticking up for dimwitted people, you are brighter than that, I hope.

          • Surfeit

            Charles Manson Atari’s Pong! Must have missed that one. It was all ‘Dr J. vs Larry Bird’ in my house.

          • Kai

            I’m kinda confused by your reply. I’m not using any studies. You said people wouldn’t say in real life 99% of the fucked up shit they say on the internet. I agree that people are a bit more loose or careless with their words online than offline in real life. At the same time, I think what we read online influences our attitudes and by extension, what we might say in real life. Therefore, while you advise @insomnicide:disqus to not “be such a lap dog” and “remember this is the internet” because of his indignation with people cheering on the terrorists, I’m saying this kind of behavior online (selective cheering on of terrorists depending on who the victims are) unfortuantely can still influence what people think in the real world.

  • Progressive Dubstep

    COOL

    • Germandude

      Where are you from Dubstep?

      • mr.wiener

        I rather doubt that he is German.

        • Germandude

          Yeah me too. It doesn’t matter. I am just interested to know that’s all ;-)

      • Progressive Dubstep

        Deutschland aka Germany

        • Germandude

          Und der Reichsadler in Deinem Avatar und Deine Kommentare bzgl. USA und die Immigration dort sollen mich ueberzeugen, dass Du ein deutscher Nazi bist? Oder verstehe ich die Ironie hier nicht und Du gibst den “agent provocateur”? Gepaart mit Deinem Namen ergibt das relativ wenig Sinn.

          • xiaode

            Zumindest hat der (un)werte Kollege hier das mit abstand dämlichste Avatar… ich kann für unser Land nur hoffen das er da nicht herkommt und wenn doch, das er da nicht wieder hin zurück geht…

            edit: Gott sei gedankt er is es nicht….

          • Progressive Dubstep

            Oh, Du bist zu deutsch. Wie tun Sie, ich weiß, die Nazi-Zeichen ist irreführend, aber es ist etwas Besonderes Wälzer. Ich bin kein Rassist. Verzeihen Sie meine Deutschkenntnisse, bin ich immer noch relevant neu in der deutschen Sprache :)

          • Germandude

            Yeah well. As expected. You are not native German. I don’t care if you are a racist or not. The usage of that symbol is stupid and since you seem to be new to Germany let me tell you one thing: Just because you are on the internet, doesn’t mean that you are fine to use forbidden symbols such as the one in your avatar.

            I suggest you google for “§ 86a Strafgesetzbuch” if you wanna stay in Germany for longer.

          • Progressive Dubstep

            Are you white?

          • Germandude

            In winter yes. During the year more like pink. In summer sometimes light-brown. Wanna date me?

          • Progressive Dubstep

            I guess not, if you revearse your argument. you can see that your picture is also ironic in a way.

            Let’s continue this Germandude, i enjoy talking to you and i like to know more about Germany because I am going to France in 3 months and i want to make the best out this German trip :)

          • Progressive Dubstep

            if you are a woman :)

          • Markoff

            well if he is in China it’s apparently fine, today I went in elevator with guy who had hakenkreutz earings, I saw also bike lock on internet with key shaped that way and I know it’s quite big fashion in China, if he is posting it on non-german website preferrably from non-german IP address it’s perfectly fine. anyway what’s the big deal, the symbol itself is really pretty, same as SS insignia, that’s why they chose it also some CN companies, not because of the German meaning

          • Brian227

            It’s quite an ancient Buddhist symbol, amongst other things. You see them on all sorts of carvings and temple goods.

  • commander

    The radical heinous attack in the concourse of the Kuming Station appears to result in the antagonism of the Xijangnese against the separatists.

    History shows that the success of political campaigns requires grass root backing. This means the the latest mass knife attack can be seen as a significant miscalculation by the leadership in the secessionist movement.

  • nathas909

    I am Xinjiangnese, but I’m not a thug; just like you are
    Cantonese, but are not a prostitute. You know what I mean!!!
    This is the best response yet. Simple but effective.

    • Kai

      I liked the picky eater one. Cantonese are not commonly stereotyped as prostitutes, and most of the prostitites in the Pearl River Delta are “wai di ren” from elsewhere in the country, often backwater impovrished villages. They work in the factories and moonlight as prostitutes at night, cuz there’s money to be had and needs back home.

  • Zappa Frank

    People in those pictures are Xinjiang people, but they are all Han people. Of course they consider themselves part of china.
    Uyghur people are not like them, by what I’ve seen are like in the pictures below.. but if someone knows more than thanks to correct me..

    • Kevin Yu

      I do not know more than you, but Uigur people have a totally different culture than normal Chinese in my experience.

      When I was in Xinjiang the Uigurs play with their knives on the open street, because somehow their religion/tradition tells tham thats manly.
      In Beijing the Uigurs who sell their cake are the worst sellers. If you want 100g, they cut you 500g and if you say thats to much they yell at you and get their “friends” to threaten you. I see it almost every time when I am going through the food-street here in northern Changping.

      • Paulos

        The Uyghur people are Turkic, not Sinitic. So yes, totally different.

      • Gordon Gogodancer

        Big deal…that’s just how they do business because they know most Chinese are pussies. You just need to stop being a paranoid little girl and understand that the guy ISN’T ACTUALLY going to stab you for 500g of cake! They are just poor fuckers trying to extort some extra cash from an easy target.
        In 2009 i came to Chengdu with a friend. After a few days we went to the train station to get to a different city. On the way to the station we decided to get some cake (qiegao). After the guy cut a slice and asked us for an outrageous amount of money we just told them to fuck himself and started walking away. He grab my friend by the arm holding his big knife in one hand. My friend just asked him ” what? You wanna dance?” He held the guy by the waist and started dancing. The dozen of Uygur men women and children around started roar in laughter.
        That’s just an example, i’m not saying everyone CAN solve a problem in this manner but the point is: The guy IS NOT going to hurt you for a piece of cake. You just need to make him understand that there is no point for him trying to threaten you

        • Insomnicide

          What’s the difference between this and blackmailing? Are you saying it’s okay for them to deal business with ordinary people like this? Not everyone is a 2 meter tall roided up kung fu master, an ordinary person with common sense isn’t going to go around dancing with people holding knives.

          • Markoff

            that’s why less and less people buy anything from them and after recent events in Beijing and Kunming I would not be surprised in another drop in sales in their restaurants and street stalls, they deserve it for their cheating, not saying Chinese are not cheating but at least street sellers are in general much more honest than Uighurs

          • xiaode

            Yes, that´s usual the feedback you get from customers if you teach them that you are not an honest business partner.

            And by the way… it´s just stupid! In that way they will loos all further business opportunities.

            There was a small Xinjiang restaurant very close to my home in SH. Went there a couple of times… food was really good. One day they cheated me for 1 yuan… (told me a food is 1 yuan more expensive then the menu says)… never went there again…

          • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

            You should have mentioned something about the Prophet Mohammed saying something about merchants and their scales.

            Ah, found it:

            “The Prophet (Pbuh) passed by a pile of food and put his hand into it, and his fingers touched something wet. He said, “What is this, O seller of the food?” The man said, “It got rained on, O Messenger of Allaah.” He said, “Why did you not put it (the wet part) on top of the pile so that the people could see it? He who deceives does not belong to me.” According to other reports, “He who deceives us is not one of us,” or, “He is not one of us who deceives us.” (Narrated by Muslim).”

            http://peacepropagation.com/stop-cheating-islam-strictly-prohibits-it/

            Not sure it would work, but at least they’d get a hint if they are Muslim.

          • xiaode

            If you could get me this in Chinese… ?
            In English it won´t work….

          • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

            I’ll try to find it in Chinese. I haven’t done research into religion with other languages than English.

          • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

            Ok, finding that is proving difficult. I need to ask for help.

            But you could I guess quote the Koran Verses 83:1-3

            [83.1] Woe to the defrauders,
             傷哉!稱量不公的人們。
            [83.2] Who, when they take the measure (of their dues) from men take it fully,
             當他們從別人稱量進來的時候,他們稱量得很充足;
            [83.3] But when they measure out to others or weigh out for them, they are deficient.

             當他們量給別人或稱給別人的時候,他們不稱足不量足。

            Sorry, couldn’t really find the Chinese hadith. I am sure there are those out there, I guess it will take a bit more time.

            Google translate comes out as:
            “由一堆食物过去了,先知(祈主福安之)将手伸了进去,他的手指触到湿润的东西,他说:”这是什么,食品邻卖家?“那人说,”它得到了下雨,使者真主。“他说,”你为什么不把它(湿部)对桩的顶部,这样的人能看到它?他谁欺骗不属于我的。“另据报道,“谁欺骗了我们是不是自己人”,或者,“他不是我们的一员谁欺骗了我们。”(穆斯林圣训)。“

            Not sure how good that is.

          • Gordon Gogodancer

            You clearly don’t understand China..you silly “foreigner”

          • Gordon Gogodancer

            Yeah so honest…just like that one who “forgot” to give back the change on my gf’s 100 yuan when she bought 5 oranges last weekend.
            (Yeah she’s stupid but that doesn’t change the point.)
            I Hanzu people are the most naive and prejudiced people I’ve met. They are so convinced they are the goodies and fail to realize that the problem has nothing to do with ethnicity.

      • hailexiao

        It’s just intimidation and they do it because it works on local Han Chinese. They probably wouldn’t dare try pulling that shit up north in Mongolia or Russia. 400g of cake is definitely not worth stabbing someone over especially when you’re Uyghur in a Han-majority city.

      • Markoff

        the word you are looking for is not “the worst sellers” but “infamous cheaters”, everyone (at least every Han Chinese) knows this about them, that’s why you should never buy anything from them

      • Mateusz82

        “Normal Chinese” Subtle.

        Do Uhygurs also invade their neighbors under the pretext of yellow man’s burden, divide the country into a majority master race, 55 untermenschen groups, and everyone who doesn’t fit being “foreigners”?

    • cantonizi

      How one can tell if a China gal is an Uighur or a Han in Xinjiang?
      Uighur gals don’t go out with white guys or marry them in no way, not like Chinese working gals.

      • Zappa Frank

        and your point is that to recognize if someone is han or Uyghur you have to date them?

        • Reptilian

          Heck, if cantonizi is single, why not?

    • Mateusz82

      It is pretty telling that only images of more Han-looking Xianjianese were up there. It’s easier for the Han to accept people who look like them. I’d like to see more accept the various white and brown folks as equally Chinese.

    • zaww

      The beautiful little girl on the first picture is a Uighur , the rest of them (girls) were just born in xinjiang . Start from 80’s, there was a movement or policy called “support border area” 支边运动 in China, government sent many technical engineers ,doctors,university graduates to the xinjiang,xizang(Tibet)and south border of China., to support building the modernize city. These young people built the beautiful cities with great enthusiasm ,and love the cities as their homes. These xinjiangness are suffered riots every times,hurt by thugs, because they are HAN people.
      Do real Uighur like HAN people? From my side, the personal opinion :
      1.They are haughty. when I was still a university student, the only Uighur girl in my class often laughed at other girls‘ appearance ,thinking they were less beautiful than her. ( I admit most Uighur girls are beautiful,but so what?)
      2. They are exclusive. Once I went to Urumqi 乌鲁木齐 for business reason,outside of a big shopping mall,3 Uighur children run out the revolving door with a rush, the door almost hit on my face,and I still can remember their blue eyes full of hate,they said some uygur language to me then ran away, the parents following them with stone faces, as if I wasn’t there. My friends told me the Children said to me were kind of curse(abuse).
      So , I am a HAN people, I believe I am not prejudiced.
      From my side, sometimes it’s hard to love them.

      • Zappa Frank

        If she is Uighur I may be a Korean… She is just a Han with colored hair and contact lens..her face does not have any Uighur trait, just Han..
        Xinjiangnese suffered riots? Apparently uighurs suffered and still are suffering more according to what they say…
        What you say about Uighurs in china I can assure that is said about Chinese in some western countries..

  • Nick in Beijing

    I really like this post.

    This is an example of the kind of thing I wish I could hear people in China saying more often.

    Instead of finding reasons to separate themselves with self imposed categories and classifications, this post expresses the sense of common humanity that I wish people in China would display more often.

    Instead of saying “we are Xin Jiangnese and we are different” they say “we are Chinese and we are the same”.

    If people took it one step further and started saying “we are human and we are the same”, then I think a lot of small aspects of daily life in China would take a lot of small steps forward.

    • Zappa Frank

      Although I agree with your idea in this post they say that they are the same because they are the same. They are all Han people. Such comments could have significance if pronounced by Uyghur people.. but it is unsure if there are among those comments. The only one just says he is not a terrorist, not that he is the same as other and sincerely I suspect it’s a fake because I’ve seen that pictures somewhere else, but I cannot be sure..

  • linette lee

    WOW!!!! The people of Xinjiang! Raise your voice! I am so proud of you! Let the rest of China hear you! And no, I don’t know about China but HK folks don’t consider you or Tibet people less than people in Mainland. We are all just people no one is better or less. The Taiwanese and Hkese who pay attention to China knew about the 7.5 incident. 新疆7.5事件回教徒殘殺漢人 We saw on our news. So you didn’t suffer quietly alone. We knew about the Tiananmen square massacre too on our news. Hope China can come up with solution to fix Xinjiang. Add Oil Xinjiang!
    These videos were popular

    • Gordon Gogodancer

      Jesus Christ….

      • linette lee

        Some Uyghur were killing Hans on the street on the 7-5 incident. The next day when the China military force regained control, the Hans were protesting complaining that Police came late. Some Hans chased after the Uyghur on the street and start beating them. But was stopped by China police. It was on HK TV because HK reporters went to Xinjiang to follow up with the incident. It was a big mess. People were walking in fear and armed themselves with knives and homemade weapons. It wasn’t good for both Hans and Uyghur people.

        • Gordon Gogodancer

          Yes, i saw the news too

  • Gordon Gogodancer

    I think it’s really sad that they feel like they need to defend themselves like that. But i guess there still is some use to it.

    My favourite comment: “I am Xinjiangnese, but I’m not a thug; just like you are Cantonese, but are not a prostitute”

    • linette lee

      Most prostitutes in China are from Canton Guangzhou? I didn’t know that.

      • Markoff

        ever heard about CN sex capital Dongguan?

        • Paul Schoe

          No, Linette doesn’t read CS that often, so she isn’t aware of Dongguan

    • hailexiao

      That comment can be expanded to include all the provincial stereotypes: “I am Sichuanese, but I’m not a gastronome; just like you are Henanese, but are not a counterfeiter…”

      • Gordon Gogodancer

        Yes indeed….however in my opinion Sichuanese not being gastronomes goes without saying :D
        I’ve lived in Beijing, Shanghai and i am currently in Chengdu and Sichuan people not being gastronomes is the least you can say.

  • FYIADragoon

    Was waiting for the Xinjiangnese to speak up on this. It’s silly how the Chinese living outside of Xinjiang and Yunnnan have no real perception of nationality vs ethnicity.

  • NOMIS

    Hey lets not let a few rotten apples spoil it for everyone? Rip to the dead and get well soon to those that got injured shout out from canada !! You got brothers and sisters over here praying for ya !

  • commander

    I think the best resolution to prevent a recurrence of the latest attack is that the Chinese government launch a campaign to win hearts and souls of the public in Xinjang, diminishing the acitivity scope of separatists and making any terriorist attack schemes hard to to execute.

    Building a sense of collective solidarity among all Chinese ethnic minorities are vastly crucial to fending off any eparatist movements.

    • linette lee

      From my experience living in USA and HK, Muslim can not co exist with other religions or politics. They are very different. They need to have their own space and lands to practice their own politics and religion. And don’t try to assimulate them or change them. It won’t work. It’s their religion, their culture, their politic. They need to have their own gov’t to govern their own people. Don’t meddle in their affair. The only way for peace is to give them room and leave them alone.

      • commander

        Your point is that the Chinese govenment or the CCP need to permits ethnic Uighrs to govern themselves independent of any outside influences in their won region?

        Is the Xinjang Province already self governing?

        • linette lee

          Don’t China always tell them what to do, what they can or can not do? I think China is not crazy about freedom of religion. Look at what China do to those Falun Gong members. I read it somewhere they don’t like any religion practice or gathering. Even Christianity they don’t want. There are lots of “underground” Christian churches. The Christians gather somewhere in someone’s house to practice their religion. And they usually don’t dare to walk around claiming they are Catholic or Christians. The China gov’t see religion practice as segregation and ideas that post a threat to the gov’t.

          • North-eastern

            There are mosques and churches in China (not “underground” as you mentioned) and I have never seen any time in the past that anyone had stopped them from practising their religion, nor dictating them what to do and what not to do.

            I deeply admire how Chinese government has managed to keep politics and religion separate from each other (as long as I have seen, known and experienced in my ten years in China).

      • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

        From my experience, people of one culture or group tend to stick together. I know it isn’t always the case, but the fact that such things as China Town, Korea Town, Little Tokyo or Bangla Town (Brick Lane, London) pop up show this to be the case. Asimilation into a society takes time. I would say depending on the number coming in and how long they have been there. It could take as long as 3-4 generations. And that also depends on how often the group ‘goes home’ to get married to someone from there (common practise among some immigrants of South Asian roots).

        I have cousins who are were the only group of coloured people living amongst white people. They lived in a small town. Other than the food they ate and the language they spoke at home, they were pretty much English. In the larger towns and cities, you get people grouping together. This has both positive and negatives.

        One example to take a look at is the East End of London. Brick Lane was once a big Jewish immigrant area (as well as Shadwell) but they have been replaced by Asians (Bangladeshis to be precise). Now, newer immigrants are slowly moving in replacing the current ones, but I think it would take longer for the presence of the current residents to deminish due to other factors.

        Whether one integrates depends on a lot of things too. Most of the Asians I knew and the White people I knew only really intereacted through football. Socially, one side spent time drinking while the other didn’t. Since it is a social activity they both didn’t share they have that devide there (I am generalising here).

        My experience is, there is some integration but when one side kinda goes “We don’t like that, don’t do that, you’re in our country and we don’t like you dressing in a certain way or eating certain stuff, etc.” you create a devide. This is created by both sides.

    • Insomnicide

      The CCP has been pulling this multicultural campaign nationwide for the last 50 years. Doesn’t work. It not only hurts the ethnic minorities who think they’re being ‘othered’ it also hurts the Han Chinese because Han culture is suppressed in favour of ethnic minority cultures.

  • Progressive Dubstep

    ds

  • བོད་

    I can foresee Al-Qaeda supplying weapons to the persecuted Xinjiang minorities in the near future, and the establishments of small milicia groups inside China which will result in a similar war than the one happening in Syria right now. Then the event will spread all over China with Tibetan and other ethnic groups joining the fight for independence. With western interference, CCP will collapse and China will become another Yougoslavia.

    • Zappa Frank

      highly improbable…

      • བོད་

        A top ranking Al-Qaeda leader has already threatened China because of the mistreatment of Uighur in the past. He stated that “China is an enemy of the Muslim world”.

        • Zappa Frank

          well, they said pretty much the same of almost all countries in the world, including some Muslim countries (but not enough or Muslim in a wrong way).. Besides except for Uyghur and maybe Tibetans there are no other significant race problems..

        • YourSupremeCommander

          Just because some random cave person said a negative comment and the whole of china will shit their pants? LMAO, you watch too many Hollywood flicks brother.

    • mr.wiener

      Extremely highly improbable.
      sniff….sniff…is that wistful thinking I smell?

      • བོད་

        Pakistan is China’s geographical neighbor and Al-Qaeda’s stronghold. Smuggling weapons and Taliban fighters to Xinjiang would be very easy. You are also dismissing the JIHAD which is indoctrinated in the most radical of Uighur muslims.

        • mr.wiener

          Localized guerrilla warfare discontent, bombings killings and kidnapping prompted by outside Jihaddis? very likely.

          …”will result in a similar war than the one happening in Syria right now.”
          “CCP will collapse and China will become another Yougoslavia.”

          Not very likely at all….not saying this to offend you, but I think you are looking at more of a situation like the Philippines, than Syria or Yugoslavia

        • YourSupremeCommander

          Comparing Syria and Pakistan to China? Are you still in the 3rd grade? One itchy trigger finger by the PLA would smash any uprising attempt in a heartbeat. If they can do it to their own kind in 1986, they can certainly would not blink any eye for these ethnic groups.

          • Brian227

            They didn’t “smash any uprising attempt in a heartbeat” in 1999 or we wouldn’t be discussing this ongoing problem now.

            By the way, I’m interested to know what major crackdown happened three years before the Tiananmen one?

          • YourSupremeCommander

            Gorrilla acts of defiance no one can stop, but try to pull a Tiananmen or a Tahir Square, and see how fast tanks and armor vehicles will plow thru the crowd. Under Chinese control all they can muster is low level harm here and there, nothing more. Iam not saying who’s right or who’s wrong here, merely stating the fact that the PLA is not to be fucked with.

          • Brian227

            The PLA don’t have any responsibility for internal policing, not since 1989. The PAP, under the 2009 ‘Law on the People’s Armed Police Force’, have them ultimate authority over public order policing which is why in amongst the lines of black and blue uniforms, you’ll always see a bloke in camouflage with a bit of gold braid and a walkie-talkie. Take a look at any of the many videos on Youku or even YouTube of the wujing dealing with riots – not a single ba-yi capbadge to be seen.

        • linette lee

          You are talking about more terrorist shxt now? And you wonder why so many people label Muslims as terrorists. You guys portray Muslims as terrorists. Not China or America. Don’t blame other people of your bad image. lol.

  • wacky

    asdf

  • བོད་

    The zhonghua minzu concept is a CCP propaganda tool. There is no cohesion or unity among the ethnic minorities in China. The Dalai Lama’s death will be a turning point in China’s history, as the Middle way approach has lost all its credibility and the overwhelming majority of Tibetans living within the TAR are yearning for independence. Also don’t forget about the JIHAD culture for the predominantly Sunni Uighur. One suicide bomber will generate a dozens more. How can CCP control that? How can they contain 10 million Uighur living in Xinjiang, with the majority being pro-east Turkestan?

  • Zappa Frank

    I’ve never disputed if is legal or not. to tell the truth I don’t even know what are we talking about, i’m not here to be Uyghur defender. The article itself is absurd… Chinese Han people that live in Xinjiang feel the need to justify themselves and assure other Chinese Han people that they are Chinese….

    • Kai

      Yes, some are merely Han Chinese in Xinjiang. Many are actual Uyghurs though so I don’t think your characterization at the end is fair to the Weibo topic. I actually thought it was really positive and reassuring, that Uyghurs, Xinjiang residents, and other Chinese were speaking out condeming unfair generalizations and prejudice against Uyghurs and Xinjiang calling for more humanity and rationality after an emotional tragedy. Why make it sound so negative? This is a bright spot on the Chinese internet.

      • Zappa Frank

        The whole question is between Uyghurs and Han, not between Han in Xinjiang and Han in the rest of china, therfore i think is absurd to see pictures of xinjiang’s Han girls that talk good about themselves and how they are chinese.. it’s obvious.
        Are there Uyghurs that say something about ? Apparently there is only one (not sure on the original article) that says he’s not a terrorist (don’t say however “we are chinese”, but it may be intended).. but, as i said, i have some supect because i’ve seen that picture somewhere esle, i suspect he may be a fake….

        • Alex Dương

          Frank, I don’t think it’s always so obvious who is Han and who is not.

          http://images.lpcdn.ca/924×615/200906/03/246254-leader-etudiant-wuer-kaixi-droite.jpg

          The guy on the right is (a younger) Wu’erkaixi, who was one of the student leaders at Tiananmen. Can you really tell that he’s Uyghur?

          Have you ever met any Kazakhs? They neighbor Xinjiang, and they are also a Turkic people, but they look quite “Asian.”

          • Zappa Frank

            Uyghur look Asians, but not as Chinese…I’ve posted pictures of Uyghur below. As said, since for Chinese law you just need one parent of an ethic minority to be part of the same group it may be that in many cases some that are classified as Uyghur just had one grandparent that was really Uyghur.

          • Alex Dương

            Not all Uyghurs look like that. This is a picture of the first President of the East Turkestan Republic. I don’t think by looks alone, you could tell him apart from a Hui, who you couldn’t tell apart from a Han setting aside religious dress.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Khoja_Niyaz.jpg

            As I said, just take a look at Kazakhs.

          • Zappa Frank

            Ok, I understand. What you say is true.. but for sure he doesn’t look much Han either.
            However, the girls in the pictures you really think are pure Uyghur? because in the end we were talking about them..

          • Alex Dương

            I don’t know. Maybe, maybe not. I do want to comment that it’s not clear to me that the Uyghurs are “native” to Xinjiang. As I understand it, Xinjiang became a part of the Qing Empire in the 18th Century when the Qianlong Emperor wiped out the Dzunghars in that area, who were the majority group. The Dzunghars were a people of Mongolian, not Turkic, origin.

            (This doesn’t justify CCP policies over Xinjiang any more than those policies justified this attack.)

          • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

            That guy reminds me of Ming from Flash Gordon.

          • Alex Dương

            You dig the beard?

          • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

            I can’t grow a beard.
            I’ve seen women with more facial hair than I do.

        • Kai

          Yes, I agree, it’s Uyghurs and Han, not people in Xinjiang vs people outside of Xinjiang.

          I get the point you’re trying to make. You believe these girls are Han Chinese merely in Xinjiang. You believe some of them mistakenly think other Chinese are merely attacking Xinjiang (a place) when they are actually attacking Uyghurs (a people).

          If this is so, then this demonstrates the ignorance and idiocy of these Han Chinese people. If this is so, this Weibo topic once again demonstrates how Han Chinese people “don’t get” the problems they face and contribute to.

          What I’m saying is that I think you’re being a bit too quick to judge who are Uyghurs and who aren’t based on a few photos and then reading a bit too negatively into what these people are saying. I will be the first to say there are some idiotic Chinese people in that Weibo topic who really are that dense and mistakenly think this is about one place versus the rest instead of about ethnic tensions and discrimination. I thought the same thing when I read some of the posts where people explain how they are originally from elsewhere in China, that they went there to “build up the frontier” or whatever.

          But let’s look at 南山初雪’s weibo post, the most popular one, with over 23x the upvotes of the post by 巩梦宇_, who specifically understands and responds to the matter being Han vs. Uyghur.

          Let’s look at 青蛇婊’s post, the one which first suggests the writer is a Han Chinese person who traces their ancestry from outside Xinjiang and is not actually a Uyghur. He has 12x LESS upvotes than the first post. I agree, it sounds like he’s defending Xinjiang the place, and not Uyghurs the people. Except he kinda does by pointing out that the terrorists are just a small group of people, not all of them.

          Let’s look at Mi藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌藌酱iM, which to me sounds like someone who doesn’t realize the issue is about Han vs. Uyghurs and merely laments Xinjiang place bashing. However, we have no idea if this netizen is a Han girl “talking good about themselves. It’s probably a guy, who is irked that news presenters seem to be emphasizing “Xinjiang”.

          Let’s look at 乔见-付小狒狒’s post. I’d say this was pretty good. Slams the point home. Don’t generalize people by their ethnicity or origin. Good stuff.

          Now the biggie: 赞古mama-‘s post, more than 8x less upvotes than the first one. Is she Han or Uyghur? I can’t tell (I upvoted someone who made the point about cosmetic contact lenses). She says she was born and raised in Urumqi but her grandparents “moved out of the big city”. Do we assume they means they moved out of some big city from elsewhere in China and thus that means she’s probably not Uyghur and is instead Han? She does talk about how great the “place” is, but she also defends the people and the culture there, which includes the Uyghurs. She recognizes the place as a mixture. She doesn’t separate out Hans from the Uyghurs. And she includes a photo of Uyghur dancers.

          More pictures of her: http://photo.weibo.com/2584654604/albums/detail/album_id/42854347?from=profile_wb&pos=18#!/mode/1/page/1

          奥利弗晶 is another post which included a picture. Can’t really tell if she’s Uyghur or not. She doesn’t have the stereotypical features of a Uyghur as shown in photos of other Uyghurs but that doesn’t mean she isn’t one given that there’s plenty of mixed-blood Han-Uyghurs. Her comment doesn’t strike me as having anything suspiciously ignorant in it, nor does she say anything about “we are chinese”.

          懒猫儿_驴’s has the appeal that “we are all Chinese”, but there is no photo of a possibly Han Chinese girl. Makes a good point about multiculturalism and that there are good and bad people elsewhere.

          Then there is Jiang, 阿力木江 (whom I just realized I had gotten mixed up with 王亚琦_w in an earlier comment). You say you’ve seen this picture elsewhere so suspect this isn’t a photo of the netizen and thus suspect this weibo post is fake. Okay, until we know this photo isn’t of this netizen, I’m not sure how eager we should be to discount this weibo post entirely. I will note that one of his weibo URL addresses includes the word “uighur” in it.

          http://www.weibo.com/p/1005051860803900/info?from=page_100505&mod=TAB#place

          昌吉王者 makes a good point about how no individual represents a religion or ethnic group. Positive statement there. No selfie photo of a pretty girl.

          琉璃无殤也无双’s post irked me for how presumptuous he was in declaring that Xinjiang people (and he likely means Uyghurs here) love China also, but hey, he has Uyghur friends so who knows.

          我的男朋友是白羊座Wz偶吧 is another non-Uyghur Han post. Doesn’t say anything ignorant really and again, no pretty girl picture.

          小超人丶已死’s comment may be a Han Chinese person who thinks the hate is about the place and not the people. Maybe. We aren’t certain. We only read that into his remarks. Again, no selfie of pretty girl.

          她的故事她的梦v, here’s one with a pretty girl, and she claims we are all children of China. That’s annoying right? Especially if she’s Han and presuming she can speak on behalf of the Uyghurs. But we have no idea if she is Han or not. We have no idea if she interprets all the hate against Xinjiang people as hate against mere residents of Xinjiang or hate against Uyghurs. Do we assume she’s Han just because she identifies with China? Do we presume no Uighur would identify with China?

          So the last one on cS also with a selfie of a pretty girl: 巩梦宇_. She doesn’t say anything trite like “we are all Chinese” but seems to be resentful of how the rest of China doesn’t express as much sympathy for shit that goes down in Xinjiang as they do when it happens elsewhere. She does have a nice ending sentence though.

          So, on the whole, I’m not sure it is fair to CONFLATE the posts with pictures of pretty girls with the OTHER posts that actually said something like “we are all Chinese”. Only ONE weibo post had both a picture of a pretty girl and said “we are children of China”.

          So I disgree with “it’s obvious”. It’s only obvious if that’s how you wanted to interpret them. To me, there’s a good variety. There’s obvious Han comments in there but they don’t pretend to be Uyghurs. There are Han comments in there who defend the Uyghurs and object to generalizations. There are also Uyghur comments and here’s some more “Uyghur-looking” Uyghurs saying something about Kunming: http://photo.weibo.com/3245525153/wbphotos/large/mid/3684916879487992/pid/c172c8a1jw1ee5byoaaaxj20bs5l3gv9

          I understand the skepticism some people have, their suspicions over Uyghur people saying anything good about China or expressing identification with larger China. I share that skepticism. While I think this Weibo topic was reassuring, I know it can hardly represent the thoughts and feelings of all Uyghurs. You can be sure there are some Uyghurs online or offline who are cheering the terrorist attack in Kunming. You can sure there are some who are denouncing it and also not expressing any enthusiasm for the notion of Uyghurs being a part of larger China.

          Yet there are also Uyghurs, pure or mixed, who may actually consider themselves part of China. Are they represented in the posts hashtagged with “I am Xinjiangnese”? I think so. I think there are a lot of Uyghur people in this Weibo post, and the single great thing they are saying and showing is that they are not all terrorists or thugs or whatever and that’s why any discriminating and stereotyping of them by others in China is pretty fucking ignorant on those doing it.

          So this topic rocks and I’d hate if people dismiss its significance. It’s not everything but it is something.

          • Watcher

            Why would it surprise you, or anyone else that these people say what they have? It would be illegal for anyone in China, Han, Uyghur or otherwise to say the opposite. Just ask Ilham Tohti.

          • Kai

            What? I don’t think I said I was surprised by what these people said at all, though I certain have my presumptions about what certain types of people might say in certain situations. As for whether or not it would be “illegal” for these people to say the opposite, I disagree. People say the opposite on the Chinese internet all the time without reprecussion. Generally expression isn’t hat big of a problem in modern China; you have to go a bit further into appearing to be actually organizing people into a movement that poses an actual substantive threat. People say all sorts of shit on Weibo these days.

          • Zappa Frank

            I’ve written already that for sure there are Uyghur people that feel part of china.
            What I wanted to point out is that many seem to have confused that thing for a Xinjiang Vs China while it is a Uyghur Vs China problem… There is only one person, that I suspect is a fake, that declare himself as Uyghur…the rest may eventually be Uyghur, but than why did not they say they are Uyghur since it is the most significant part to talk about?. what was on the rest of article on weibo I don’t know since I’ve seen just this one here.. The others Chinese in this article (don’t know on weibo) always comment Xinjiang here and Xinjiang there.. but don’t say anything about Uyghur, this is why I say it is not significant because they don’t talk about the real issue..
            the girls that look han are han, they may even eventually, for Chinese law, be Uyghur, but as we know that you need just one parent to be the minority ethnic, than I can be that they just had a grandparent or great grandparent Uyghur and even if the rest of their family was Han they are still considered Uyghur.. that doesn’t change that they live and have been rise in a 100% han culture..

          • Brian227

            Rates of intermarriage amongst Uighur and non-Uighur are ridiculously small even by Xinjiang’s ridiculously small standards. The majority of those are with other Turkic minorities rather than Han, so I wonder how many of the ‘officially-Uighur-but-not-really’ girls are the product of such a marriage. I believe it’s far more likely they’re showing the fruits of previous far-higher interbreeding rates with Mongols, Hui, Sibe, Han, etc.

            On the subject of our bearded, kebab-selling friend, he seems to be kind of famous. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2011-01/25/content_11909407.htm. Uncle Tom, perhaps, but not a fake.

          • Kai

            Yes, and the very first part of my comment was to agree with you that there are some people who are confusing the issue as Xinjiang (the place) vs. China when it is actually Uighurs (the people) vs. China. So I understood and agree with that point of yours.

            What I’m hesitant to agree with is what I felt to be your certainty that except for Jiang (and maybe not even him), they were all Han. I didn’t feel their comments justify that assumption.

            As for self-identifying as Uighur, I believe they are more commonly referred to as Xinjiang people (or as Peter translated “Xinjiangnese”) throughout China. Uighur is the proper term but Uighurs are often simply referred to as Xinjiang people. Whenever a Chinese person says Xinjiang people, they’re almost always referring to Uighurs. Therefore, it isn’t strange for Uighurs to self-identify as Xinjiang people either.

            The reason I went through the comments one by one was specifically to point out where the comments DO talk about the people in Xinjiang and why its wrong to generalize them. I agreed with you that there were some comments where it seems obvious that the netizen thinks the PLACE is being attacked, but there are plenty of comments that recognize that it is the PEOPLE being attacked, including Uighurs. The most upvoted comment on Weibo and translated here specifically mentions Uighurs. Therefore, I don’t think it is fair to characterize the entire thing as “don’t say anything about Uyghurs” and thus “not significant”. The TOP, MOST UPVOTED comment (南山初雪) specifically says “those evildoers do not represent ethnic Uyghurs!”

            I understand you feel mixed Uighurs may not be “true” Uighurs if they’ve been diluted by too much Han blood and culture. That’s like saying an ABC isn’t “Chinese” enough because they grew up in the US or a black person isn’t “black” because they grew up in an affluent neighborhood. I don’t want to argue about that. I understand your point. My point is that regardless of what their ethnicity is, I think it is significant that there are a lot of Chinese netizens, whether full Uighur, substantially Uighur, part-Uighur, diluted Uighur, or completely non-Uighur who are voicing disagreement with discrimination and stereotyping against “Xinjiang people” and “Uighurs”.

  • Irvin

    Everybody wants independence, but the incontestable fact is that the rights to the land is whoever have power to hold it.

  • Kai

    But that’s what makes it so tasty! Just like cremation ashes for BBQs. All praise Al Bundy!

  • Azeri

    The girls saying “我是新疆人”’s point would be somewhat valid if they weren’t clearly Han girls who would not feel the slightest bit affected in any way by Anti-Xinjiang, and let’s be clear about this, Anti-Uyghur sentiment. The stupidity of the average Han regarding this incident is, once again, in looking at the “human” tragedy, instead of looking into the clear puddle mess that is Xinjiang’s policies.

    Just like the earthquakes, the school stabbings, the bombings, the protests, the murders; the seething anger is totally ignored, the bigger picture and context is white-washed and compartmentalized and instead the media attention is reflected onto the incident itself. I’m totally repulsed that the idea of “What inspired several people to commit such an act” is instead manipulated to be “what ….. people…..commit such an act”.

    Having studied the Uyghurs and lived in Xinjiang, and not the Han enclaves, I can happily report that the idea of any organised terrorist cell operating out of there is a joke. Some people barely have enough money to buy a car.

    I simply ask, what “terrorist cell” sits around a table and emphatically declares Kunming to be a reputable target for the armies of God and seperatism?

    • Brian227

      “Having studied the Uyghurs and lived in Xinjiang, and not the Han
      enclaves, I can happily report that the idea of any organised terrorist
      cell operating out of there is a joke. Some people barely have enough
      money to buy a car. ”

      The same could be said of Palestine. Or the southern Philippines’ Moros, Tamil Tigers, India’s Naxalite problem and dozens of other terrorist movements who draw their inspiration and support from poverty. Most of the major 20th Century terrorist groups were linked in some way to poor minority communities.

      “I simply ask, what “terrorist cell” sits around a table and
      emphatically declares Kunming to be a reputable target for the armies of
      God and seperatism?”

      This kind of terrorist cell. One that wants to show it can operate at random outside of its own home ground.

      • Azeri

        Whilst I understand that the money argument I used was perhaps somewhat poorly constructed, it should have been more clearly described.

        I believe what seperates all other terrorist cells from the ETIM is, first and foremost, the abundant evidence of the existence of all of them. So far, third party investigators have found very little evidence to justify the very existence of the ETIM. There have been no major proclemations (contrast this with Naxalites, Tamil Tigers, Hamas etc, who happily claim responsibility for any attacks)

        Also, it should be said that it is not simply the money aspect which I found to be incredulous, but the simple factor of control. If the ETIM do indeed exist, it shows the ruling Han elite to be woefully incompetent at managing what is essentially an utterly grassroots (and poor) attempt at violent terrorism.

        For starters, they have no guns, use crude, home-made explosives (which, if one reads about most of the attacks coming out of Xinjiang, you’ll notice the 3 or 4 who are often killed by their own poorly made equipment; the guy that struck at Tiananmen square used a shitty old jeep with his mum and wife in it. If that isn’t utter desperation, as the saying goes)

        Across much of the south of Xinjiang, there are very few, if any sources of wealth available to Uyghurs. I conducted several interviews in the Kashgar and Hohtan areas, and met only one businessman who could be considered “wealthy”.

        Your argument involving other terrorist groups is valid, yes, however, almost all of the groups you mentioned had/have some form of wealthy backing, or forms of popular support, or means of obtaining serious weaponry. The Uyghurs have none of this.

        • Brian227

          Homemade explosives are not automatically an indication of lack of support – our own Irish terrorists used homemade explosives (ANFO) routinely due to the ease in obtaining raw materials compared to commercial or military explosives; as well as for security/deniability reasons (farmers tend to have lots of fertiliser around). They were regarded at one point as the most technically-adept terror organisation in Europe and had a lot of funding from Libya and certain groups of US citizens.

          That there is monied support to ETIM/TIP is pretty clear since the Uighur Gitmo detainees were picked up in Afghanistan and the Pakistani FATAs while undergoing training from Al-Quaeda affiliates. They’re also receiving support from Islamist groups via their ethnic brethren in Kazakhstan http://yalejournal.org/2013/02/26/islamic-militancy-and-the-uighur-of-kazakhstan-recommendations-for-u-s-policy/

          As to not having serious weaponry, well that’s a matter of opinion. They’ve been able to carry out successful attacks on Security Forces with knives and hand grenades and that’s all they really need to do to keep their cause alive. They win if they can incite a crackdown that alienates ordinary Uighur from the PRC state whereas the PRC needs to convince a majority that their rule is a price worth paying for a quiet life.

  • Markoff

    +1, good point

  • Markoff

    roll their tongues – explanation please?

    • Surfeit

      Argentinian-Spanish.

  • Markoff

    they like to think someone on the other side of web jerk off at their pics…

  • Paul Schoe

    I think that it makes sense in a situation like this. Showing that there are other people then just “terrorist” in their region.

    (of course this comes from the mistaken idea that you can identify terorists by their looks )

  • Surfeit

    I LOVE Jiang!
    ‘I’m not a terrorist. My name is Jiang, but I’m not a terrorist.’

    Somebody give that man a cookie.

    • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

      Man can grow a beard.

      Sadly, I cannot grow a beard. I do envy men that can. Especially when they have the big long bushy or wild beards.

      • Surfeit

        Beards are dope, no doubt.

  • Surfeit

    When they’re not stabbing people, aye.

  • Surfeit

    What’s the political community in Xinjiang? For instance, if they held a referendum on being a part of China, what would happen?

    • M8

      It would still want to be China because the majority of the Han people does not want Islamic State

  • Paulos

    Hi Wacky, Frank’s map is from the same period as yours, it’s just more thorough. It distinguishes the areas where the dynasty had actual administrative control from the areas that simply paid tribute. Here’s another good one that illustrates the same thing:

  • Brian227

    Indeed they have. Urumqi isn’t even a Uighur word, it’s Mongolian.

  • kit

    psh. most if not all the mei mei’s here are han chinese your grandpop is the an agent of oppression. stabbing people is wrong. forcing uyghurs to live as second class citizens on their own land/exploiting them also wrong

    • 白色纯棉小裤裤

      ” forcing uyghurs to live as second class citizens on their own land/exploiting them also wrong”

      Any envidences?

      From what I know ethnic minorities in China have more rights than Han Chinese. For example they are exempted from the one child policy, and have lower University entrance requirements.

  • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

    I stop buying street food in general after some of the stuff I found in them or saw some of the people cooking them and using certain things.

    • niggaplz

      dont you know most street stalls use gutter oil and dead pig meat?

  • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

    The next step of evolution is the human-dino hybrid. So the land will belong to all!

  • carlstar

    Desperate people do desperate things. Maybe China just needs to move in another couple of million Han Chinese to finish off the ethnic cleansing they started all those years ago.

  • Mateusz82

    “I am Xinjiangnese. I wear my ethnic dress. I can speak my Uyghur language. But I’m not a terrorist.”

    I didn’t know Dom Deluise faked his death, changed his name, and moved to Xinjiang. He’s no terrorist, but he did kill ’em in Blazing Saddles.

    http://static.tvgcdn.net/MediaBin/Content/090504/News/Todays_News_Our_Take/2_tues/090505dom-deluise1.jpg

    • Zappa Frank

      that is the one I suspected was a fake..

      • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

        And now you have your proof!

    • YourSupremeCommander

      He’s Xinjiangnese too!

  • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

    As much as I would like a beard, that is very expensive.

  • mr.wiener

    What is it with you and your fixation with white girls?

    • Germandude

      An unanswered call for getting laid.

  • Claude

    Mmm.. link not working? Anyway, you get a transplant like this.. so you can look like that.

  • Zappa Frank

    I suspected it, green or blue eyes in central asia are typical of the Kalash people which I suspect is the man with blond hair.. However the genetic of central Asian population is a mixture and not so clear about contributions… besides in the xinjiang region have been found old mummies with Caucasoid features and blond hair…

  • Kai

    Yes, I agree, which is why I’m hesitant to agree with @zappa_frank:disqus’s certainty that those girls are Han simply because they look Han, or that just because there has been intermixing with Han and that the Han have been in Xinjiang, that anyone who grew up with Han culture is not qualified to feel Uighur and defensive of Uighur culture.

  • Mark

    Xinjiang girls are hot.

  • Gordon Gogodancer

    Being “normal” is easy when one lives in a fairly comfortable level of society (as i do). I would think it’s less easy to be “normal” when you’re a poor fucker struggling in life and even more when you feel you are being colonized by a mass of pawns.
    The “normal” argument could be used for many things in China btw. For example: Normal people don’t re-use oil! Normal people don’t rush in and out of elevator/trains etc. like a bunch of cattle! Normal people don’t shit/piss everywhere. Normal people don’t transform whole cities into huge garbage dumps! Normal people don’t sign contracts and then don’t respect them. Do you get my meaning? It’s all about standards in life and perceptions. My point was you have to understand that “they” are indeed not like “us” however you have to trust the fact that people won’t stab you for 500g of cake. You have to understand it even though you are completely right not to tolerate it! (Pussy)

  • Kai

    Yes, I know and agree that freedom of discourse in China depends on the subject matter. I saw these people as saying a variety of things, such as how great Xinjiang is, that Xinjiang/Uighur people aren’t terrorists, and that Xinjiang and the various ethnicities are all part of the “Chinese family”. In terms of opposites, I don’t think it is meaningfully less free to say XInjiang sucks or that Xinjiang/Uighur people are terrorists.

    I can see how mobilized, orgnized agitation and action for the separation of ethnicities from China would be less free, but I see Chinese people talking shit about various ethnicities and regional peoples all the time asserting superiority and inferiority, often in cultural or social differences. In this context, I’m not sure if it’d be deemed “illegal” for a Xinjiang person to express difference with the rest of China. What I think has to happen these days is, as I said above, actual organized campaigning. I suppose if some Uighurs took to Weibo an started a #FreeXinjiang# topic corralling support for separatism/cecession, I can see authorities cracking down on that. That would be some crime of subverting state soveriegnty or something. But if its “opposite” simply in the sense of saying Uighurs are different from other Chinese, I think people could get away with that just fine without it being “illegal”.

    Have I communicated my perspective in reaction to your remark clearly enough?

    No, Weibo isn’t the be-all end-all test for freedom of speech, especially because suppression of speech is hardly uniform and consistent by authorities in China. However, it can’t be denied that Weibo and online speech in general is important and indicative of freedom of speech trends in China. If not, the government wouldn’t have policies about them.

    To the extent you’re saying freedom of speech is still precarious in China, I fully agree. I hope you’ll agree with me in recognizing that freedom of speech in China has improved in many aspects and that not everything seemingly in opposition to Chinese government positions is going to be cracked down on. I hope we’re both cautioning against beliefs on either extremes.

  • Kai

    Agreed!

  • Markus Peg

    ‘Crazy English’ founder Li Yang (who loves beating his wife) Is from Xinjiang. Just thought you would like to know.

    http://www.sino-platonic.org/complete/spp180_crazy_english.pdf

    His wife beating and proud of it (still as of March 2014 unpunished for beating his wife, still 1000s of people flock to his crappy crazy English schools…

    http://shanghaiist.com/2014/03/12/crazy_english_founder_li_yang_loves.php

  • Jack

    If China continues to take areas that don’t belong to it, even more problems will most likely occur. Do you think Xinjiang is content paying taxes to Beijing? Do you think it is ok for a muslim area to be ruled by communist douche bags? Well, how about the whole Diaoyu situation? You can imagine how severely China will be punished if it decides to take islands or other lands that do not belong to it. Tibet? Many more? You reep what you sow!

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