Chinese Students Hold Mass Rallies to Prepare for Gaokao Exam

chinese-students-hold-mass-rallies-for-gaokao

Chinese students around the country hold mass rallies to prepare for the upcoming Gaokao university entrance examination. The rally is intended to show the will and determination of the students in beating the exam and getting into their dream school. The videos show students shouting in unison slogans such as: “I will succeed”, “We will bring pride to the school”, and “For college, for honor, for parents, for teachers, fight, fight, fight!”

Comments on Youku:

钢琴上的懒惰猫:

After Gaokao what do they have left?

wqerwqer21342134:

These gestures look like the Germans in WWII.

腾讯QQ_空蝉自鸣:

Sigh, I really don’t know what to say. Does going to college mean everything will be great in the future? Is going to college your dream? College… even after going, you still won’t know what direction the future will take you. In this materialistic, money above all else [society/world], where a mobile phone never leaves your hands and human relationships are cold and indifferent, can we still find a hint of childish innocence [idealism]?

优酷院线72393713:

Haha, talk about deceiving oneself and others. A retarded generation.

影视部落:

Even North Korea doesn’t do things like this.

爱迪生梦游仙境:

Schools keep using Hengshui No. 2 High School [see below] as a model for us [students] to emulate. from. An educational system that emulates the military has made students dense, destroyed the zest that should be part of their youth. Is the Gaokao the sole purpose of life? What do the students have in their heads besides studying? Is this what education reform has resulted in?

iceman537:

Aren’t they still going to be unemployed after graduating from college, or just making 3000 kuai a month, not enough to support even themselves? Everyone [the students], just give it a rest and stop shouting/chanting [such rally slogans]…

孟孟头发短:

This kind of education system cannot produce innovative talent, but instead obedient and disciplined [able to follow guidelines] children. China’s students are only good at taking tests.

诺爸诺妈:

That the education system has become this, I don’t know whether to be happy or be sad. May your 2014 dreams come true.

没有水晶鞋和王子的灰姑娘是我:

Stupid [the school has nothing better to do]… what is the point? All that effort might as well be spent on doing more math problems… The same method doesn’t necessarily work for every student… I don’t know if the school is promoting itself or actually “boosting the morale” of the students as they claim.

hoosbrand:

A perverse school and perverse teachers. Perverse teaching methods.

Comments on Youku:

海绵星君:

Sigh…Chinese education, when can it finally change?

IniLh:

A bunch of retarded people. Forgot to take your medicine, right?

网名叫啥的:

Just how many can actually get into a top university?

88270806:

Angry youth, cannon fodder in the Chinese education system. Brainwashing and the Gaokao is the only way out [option].

七只羊128:

Education with Chinese characteristics.

多普达565:

North Koreans have found their soulmates.

SPLACF:

What I see isn’t the hope [future] of China but a perverse education system.

红色の骑士:

Millions of grass mud horses herding into the pig pen, what a sight to behold.

ZOUZHI94:

Even if you’re at the top of your class, so what? These children have no creativity. If the country continues using this mode of education, I confident we’ll still be copying others technology 100 years later.

总想周游世界:

In a huge country with 1.4 billion people, how can there not be a single Nobel Prize winner in the sciences?

A rally held at Hengshui No.2 High School in 2013:

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  • Mighty曹

    This makes me feel ashamed for spending my exam days at coffee houses.

    • Dr Sun

      and so you should

      • Mighty曹

        So ashamed that I’ve named my morning brew, ‘The Gaokao Blend’ to honor this inspiring event.

        • Dr Sun

          You really should not be drinking home brew in the morning

          • Germandude

            True dat. You should be smoking the home-grown.

          • Dr Sun

            LOL

          • Mighty曹

            Smoke homegrown in the morning.

          • Mighty曹

            Do you drink your home screw?

          • Dr Sun

            not thats a nice way to talk about my wife, so I will ignore this comment and put it down to you were drunk or high.

          • Mighty曹

            I was neither drunk nor high… just as you neither confirmed nor denied my question. :P

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        Yeah screw that. Just knowing I had more than one chance to take the SAT’s made me feel less stressed. I can’t imagine what these kids go through.

        • noodles76

          You can take the Gaokao more than once but it’s only offered annually.

          • Don’t Believe the Hype

            oh i didn’t know that. Can you take it at any age? For example, if I’m 25, can i still take the Gao Kao?

          • noodles76

            No clue, it’s not something I looked into really. It just came up when some people I know were comparing the two exams.

          • Don’t Believe the Hype

            ok got it

          • noodles76

            Even if they can take it more than once, that realization unfortunately does not let most students breathe easy and relax. Sure, our SAT scores were important but it would be rare indeed to not even be considered by a school because you were a few points shy of what they’re looking for. Frankly I’m not a fan of the SAT by any means but holy shit the Gaokao took mind numbing and fucking useless tests and turned it up to 11. SAT…about a 2.

            Only two things get kids into Uni here….scores and money. The sad part is a kids fate is often determined well before the Gaokao. Your primary school tests determine if you can get into a good middle school, your middle school tests determines if you can get into a good high school….if you can get into a good high school your chances of doing well can be greatly improved. They’ll often have ‘better’ teachers. Your social life, people skills, general knowledge, and sense of humor will likely be nonexistent though. Tradeoffs.

          • Don’t Believe the Hype

            doesn’t hurt to have money for the US education system either, just sayin. unless u want to be in debt the rest of your life.

          • Markus Peg

            Plus more chance of getting better connections with people up the chain if you study in a better school.

    • lacompacida

      Why ashame ? My best tactics at exams was getting a lot of sleep so that I can think when I really need to.

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        I think he means he feels the lead up to the exam is harder/more stressful for Chinese students than for him.

        • Mighty曹

          I was just being sarcastic.

      • Mighty曹

        My best tactics was to wake up early in the morning to study. It’s retained longer in my memory box.

  • Joey

    The gaokao, or how I learned to stop living and love the cram school.

  • noodles76

    Wow. The comments up top were actually decent. Seems it’s one thing that most Chinese can agree on is that the Gaokao is complete bullshit.

    • Stefan Xu

      Why is it complete bullshit? How else would you have an university entrance system?

      • noodles76

        It’s bullshit for many reasons. Number one is the amount of time they are forced to study for it. High School is essentially Gaokao practice exams and little more. Teaching to the test writ large. 6:30am – 10:30pm is often the schedule for students. Classes like PE or art/music/history are cancelled at will and they have to attend more ‘important’ classes like math or Chinese.

        Due to this focus on the exam, students are forced to essentially memorize the exam and it’s possible contents. Rote memorization when used by itself is not education. These kids can pound out math problems until they are given a word problem where they are actually expected to apply their ‘knowledge’. Often students are simply unable to think critically…they can’t add 2+2 unless somebody has told them specifically that 2+2=4 (don’t take that literally).

        The nastiest part about it is it’s inflexibility. Uni’s ONLY consider your score on the Gaokao and nothing more. Nothing. If you are shy one point you will not be able to attend a particular Uni. Nothing else is taken into consideration. No interviews, no essays, nobody cares if you are an athlete or volunteer in your community. The Uni’s only care what your score is, not what kind of person/student you are. Frankly, I am not a huge fan of standardized tests in general..the Gaokao is just the biggest and baddest one out there.

        Ever see hordes of kids studying while hooked up to IV’s? You will in China.

  • Jahar

    I think this is one where the Chinese commenters and the people on chinasmack can agree.

    • Stefan Xu

      I don’t agree, education is good in China. Is education that good in the west?

      • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

        I don’t agree, education is good in The West. Is education that good in china?

      • Cameron

        China’s recent relative economic growth (which places at around a poor Eastern European nation for GDP per capita/living standards) is based almost entirely on the labour of awfully paid factory laborers making Western products. So it we are judging something’s efficacy by its results, the efficacy of The Chinese system is still totally unproven long term. Having a population of high school students who are REALLY GOOD AT MATHS (and so they bloody should be the amount of hours they spend studying it) really means bugger all long term prospects of a country.

        What is even less admirable about Communist education is the lifelong distaste for learning, curiosity and reading for pleasure it distills in the population thanks to the horribly dull and tedious nature of their schooling. Not to mention some of the laughable “facts” they learn at school which shape their outlook, coupled with the vast majority having a total lack of analytical skills.

        All I know is that The few really bright (ie able to think outside the box) Chinese students I have taught

        • Guang Xiang

          An accurate description during my time at Tsinghua

      • firebert5

        Is it education, or indoctrination? Chinese media reports, you decide! Er, actually, Chinese media decides. Sorry about the mixup.

      • mr.wiener

        Says the swede.

      • Jahar

        I hope that’s a joke.

      • Dick Leigh

        A High School education is not supposed to be “good” (good for what?). No one remembers what they were taught in High School, no matter how many math equations you throw at the students!

        High School is -supposed- to prepare youth for life as an adult. Chinese High Schools fail spectacularly at this, because why bother teaching someone to be an adult when they’re going to live at home til they’re 30? Much easier to just throw them to Gaokao lions and give up teaching them anything useful.

      • IsurvivedChina

        I don’t know you tell me, you were educated in the west, in Sweden wasn’t it?

      • Reptilian

        Not good. According to you, western students just party every two days. Sadly though, you failed to see that, after partying, Western students have the imagination to start up new companies in Silicon Valley, New York, Boston…all over…while in China, the best path to riches is to pull the guanxi levers and find a big political patron to put you in a good position inside a state-owned enterprise.

  • a nation of robots….garbage in….garbage out

    • lacompacida

      As long as they are garbage imperialistic west wants, it’s OK.

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        the people are not garbage, the system is.

      • Stefan Xu

        In the meanwhile western students just party every two days..is that better?

        • Germandude

          Hey Stefan. I see you learned “ctrl+c” and “ctrl+v” already. Hurry up and learn “ctrl+alt+del”.

          • Reptilian

            I hope you realize you’ve been replying to a bot.

        • nickhz

          4th time

    • Stefan Xu

      In the meanwhile western students just party every two days…is that better?

      • Gordon Gogodancer

        Yes

      • nickhz

        third time you said that.
        i didnt party two days a week, not while i was in school, or after i finished university. played sports, had a girlfriend, had a life. the social lessons i learned when i was younger help me just as much in my daily work life as the things i learned in school. they are both very important aspects of a person. the problem is that, here in china, the peronality aspect is rare at best. too much focus on math and science.

      • Reptilian

        In the US, you go find party. In China, the Party comes to find you!

  • loki

    good for them.. Its a tough exam and has a lot tied to it. I think anything to help boost morale is a good thing…

  • Mark

    fucking creepy!

    – sincerely yours

    a German

    • loki

      oh come on…. It could be worse. They are just getting pumped up for a really difficult exam.. Not really news worthy..

      I really love the teenage mutant ninja turtle theme song at the end though

    • kenhansen

      yeah it reminds of the Hitler Jugend right?

  • Wololoo

    Close to getting a Tsinghua-University master’s degree, I can tell that most students here are already mentally ill and especially are lacking of common sense. On the other side, the chinese students are the perfect working machines, proficient in programming, modelling or whatnot. I think, they learned in their gao san already probably longer than I during the time of getting my bachelor’s degree in engineering.

    • Don’t Believe the Hype

      what is the gao san? and how is your experience at Tsinghua? Are there many student groups and clubs for discussing engineering topics with your peers? I’m curious how you would compare it to American or other foreign graduate programs. Thanks

      • Joe

        gaosan is junior year in high school (junior high in china), the year most kids take the tests

        • Don’t Believe the Hype

          oh! 高三 that makes sense. I don’t know why i thought it was another test

      • Wololoo

        Gaosan is the last year of the high school, where the students prepare for their Gaokao.

        I have friends doing exchange programs in the US, and I myself does one in China. First of all, it is the easiest to get the best grade in the US, than China and than Germany. For the workload, in Germany people do not need to attend classes or make homeworks, therefore the exams are really hard and you need to learn a lot for them (some are 2 month preparation). In China the studies are strongly homework based, especially here it is all about repetition (sometimes you can copy and paste from the lecture slides), but I don’t know about the US.

        All I know is, that the Chinese students in our course and international students from US, Italy, France (among others) complain about us Germans and our good and refined homework and presentations, which makes theirs look bad.

    • lacompacida

      Mentally ill, lack of common sense, perfect working machinese. What else does western countries want in a Chinese ?

      • IsurvivedChina

        Western countries don’t want anything but cheap goods and free trade agreements, believe it or not but its the Chinese government that wants mentally ill hardworking robots with no common sense.

        Do you honestly think the average westerner walks around thinking “mmm you know what would make my life better, if all Chinese were mentally ill but hardworking robots with a lack of common sense!”

    • Stefan Xu

      Is education that good in the west? In the meanwhile western students just party every two days, is that better?

      • Zappa Frank

        of course

      • Cameron

        Partying every two days? You do know TV shows aren’t “real”, right? Regardless, activities such as “partying” are elsewhere known as “having a life that doesn’t involve sticking your head in some horribly dry text book fifteen hours a day”, and are quite useful if you want to leave school without mental health issues and a black hole where your personality should be.

        • abc

          “having a life”, you mean getting beyond drunk in public places and arrested and doing a lot of drugs? if that don’t get you mental health issues, i dunno what does.

          • Zappa Frank

            yeah because all westerns guys inevitably get drunk every two days and get arrested, not mentioning the massive use of drugs. I would say it is the very core of our values…for sure that was his meaning, no mistakes

          • mr.wiener

            I beat my wife too. I don’t feel “manly” unless I do that once a week…just don’t tell my girlfriend I said that.

          • Zappa Frank

            well… wasn’t that a Confucius’ suggestion also? beat your wife, you don’t know why, but she does..

          • Rick in China

            I don’t know what country you’re from, but where I’m from – teenagers can buy alcohol at supermarkets, smoke freely, and get served glass plates & special straws for snorting pleasure at these party companies where you can sing.

            Oh, wait…

          • Gerhana

            they also fornicate with animal, apparently.

          • Zappa Frank

            true! let’s not forget this point.. bestiality is essential in western culture. why do you guys think so many westerns have a dog for?

          • Dick Leigh

            We also poop and pee all over Lan Kwai Fong, so people can inpsect our core values for themselves.

      • Gordon Gogodancer

        Party every two days? I think you’re referring to some exchange students who indeed have a lot of fun when they’re abroad. However in my experience, i didn’t go party “every 2 days” as you say when i was an exchange student in Beijing and i certainly did not go party during the years before reaching uni, that’s just completely mad man. I understand you might feel offended by another topic that doesn’t put China in a good light but you also need to think about your comment and how absurd it sounds.

      • nqk123

        party every two days if your degree is art, dance or management I guess. but if your degree is accounting, engineer, science. you better hit the books every day.

      • Dick Leigh

        Please. We party on the weekends, just like our Chinese comrades. Chinese students party harder I find though, and binge drink way more. There’s also a lot more vomit everywhere…

      • IsurvivedChina

        says the boy who received a Swedish education!

      • Wololoo

        I rarely party during my studies. I am engineering major and work in industry consulting projects parallel. I maybe go out once every 3 weeks to the max, and than do not even drink any strong alcohol.

        What you mean is probably people like art or society studies majors, they usually have such an easy study they can party a lot, but eventually will drive people like us engineering students later with a taxi.

    • Guang Xiang

      I have studied at Tsinghua as well. Despite being the top in China, I found the professors and research groups to be lackluster compared to Western counterparts. It’s true that the students definitely are hard working and intelligent, but to think outside the box, it’s not there.

      • Reptilian

        So what do you think is the root cause of the lack of innovativeness? My personal theory is that it’s rooted in the Confucian deference to authority, of wanting to save face and of having to be a good “copier” of what went before oneself in order to climb the ladder of success. That kind of environment does not encourage questioning “established” doctrines and overturning what has been ages-old “wisdom”–which we know is a vital ingredient in innovation and invention.

        • Guang Xiang

          Nothing like that. Chinese were innovators in the past; I think it’s all boils down to Mao’s legacy and lack of freedom. Just take a look at Taiwan and Hong Kong.

          But China is approving. Some products are becoming more popular like the Xiao Mi smart phones.

        • SzMach5

          Guang Xiang’s response is correct.
          I just want to add, China’s current education system is part of the problem too because it focuses too much on memorization which is bad for the young children’s creativity development.

          Mao’s Cultural Revolution is also a huge factor for hindering innovation too. However, as of recent, it’s been slowly recovering.

          • Brian227

            Memorisation by rote isn’t in itself the problem. I certainly find it useful to be able to remember things drummed into me by rote decades ago as opposed to looking them up or calculating them each time. It’s far easier to build on existing knowledge when it’s at your fingertips than when you have to relearn it constantly.

            Rote learning was the prevailing model of education in the UK when we were undergoing our Industrial Revolution and indeed forms the basis for the examination system of Oxford and Cambridge universities’ year-end exams. It’s hard to see a convincing argument that it acted as a barrier to innovation or research excellence in those cases.

            The GCR is definitely a factor in stamping conformity for safety’s sake on the nation. As that shadow falls away, there’ll be less of the same mindset

          • SzMach5

            I guess what I meant to say was too much memorization is bad (in my opinion). I find memorization useful too but putting too much emphasis on it isn’t the best way.

            I see your point and I never knew that rote learning was a model for UK education; thanks for sharing that.

        • Teacher in China

          Read up on Paulo Friere’s work about education under oppressive regimes. It wasn’t written about China specifically, but it fits.

        • Brian227

          I think the shortage of indigenous innovation has more to do with weak intellectual property rights, myself. When any innovating you do for yourself is nothing more than a subsidy for your competitors’ R&D then why bother? There’s enough evidence that even in PRC there are plenty of creative people but their problem is in securing an advantage from it in business terms.

          Mainland China also isn’t the only Confucian society in the region and most of the others have been at the forefront of Asia-Pacific’s development in the last few decades so the cultural argument doesn’t seem to me to hold much water.

          • Reptilian

            I think you’re confusing development with innovation. An economy does not need to be innovative to be developed. China rode on the back of cheap manufacturing to become the powerhouse it is today. Just reverse engineer everything that comes out of the US, Europe and Japan, sell at a lower price point and voila–instant profits.

            Weak IP protection has been argued as the largest constraint on Chinese innovation. It’s a valid argument, but it’s a shallow argument. Not everything can be copied successfully. Sina’s Weibo for example, has the lion’s share of the microblogging platform in China, even amidst a slew of many johnny-come-latelys who basically copied (and still continue to copy) everything Weibo does, but Weibo still is king in Chinese microblogging. But the idea of microblogging itself, that came from Twitter (USA). Ditto the idea of “social networking”. Likewise crowdfunding, or venture capitalism. All copied from the West. You can extend that to physical products like electric cars, solar panels, wind power, etc. Everything copied from abroad, even as the first-generation foreign-educated students are already entering retirement age. So what did Chinese best and brightest studied abroad for in the end? A nice fat pension, it appears.

            Have you even worked in a Chinese company? Or with Chinese colleagues at a multinational in China? I have, and I’ve seen ’em up close. The deference to authority I’m telling you persists on a systemic and deeply-rooted way. Management and technical talents could barely raise a differing opinion when someone higher up makes a decision. It’s almost like the word of the highest-paid person in the room is set in stone every time. Good ideas are shot down before they’re even tabled, and even the foreign-educated talents would just swallow their pride for the sake of keeping their good-paying jobs. Stability over the “chaos” of starting down a different path.

          • Brian227

            I’m very clear about what both innovation and development mean and I was careful in how I used them. I stand by my statement that security of benefit is essential to turn creativity into innovation. Development is a separate issue which impacts the situation only in the sense that ‘developed’ countries have strong rule of law and respect for property rights, particularly IP.

            This is a country where governments at all levels do very little for the population and they’re left to find their own solutions to a whole host of everyday problems. That to me is a slam dunk case for inherent creativity existing in China – never mind Taiwan, Hong Kong, Korea, Japan or any of the other Confucian-influenced societies which display high levels of both creativity and innovation.

            The companies you mention – do they reward dissent and boat-rocking from their employees or embrace it? I would bet the former and see that as the explanation for why Chinese firms show low levels of innovation even though they have employees who may very well be creative in their own time.

  • Lei Feng’s Hat

    “…fight, fight, fight!”
    Who are you fighting against, kids? Oh, that’s right…each other.
    Battle on, Xena!

  • wes707

    Uniformity and collectivism are antithetical to creativity and innovation.

  • Mihel

    Pride? Honor? Fighting?
    Why do they feel so strongly about school? Seems like they are about to embark on a holy mission.

    • Stefan Xu

      As a student you represent the school. They must also work hard so they can bring honor to the country.

      • Mihel

        Students only represent themselves unless elected as a representative of some students commitee/association, in which case they represent a group of students, not the school as a whole. Anyway the gaokao is more or less an admission test on steroids, so the students are not yet part of that school, how can they represent it?

        Don’t know, I personally never felt so strongly about any of the schools I’ve attended, surely the honor of the country was the last of the things that motivated me to study LOL

        • noodles76

          They feed the kids that ‘honor’ horseshit because how the students fare on the Gaokao directly impacts the school and it’s teachers. They actually do represent the school (high school) in a literal sense.

      • Zappa Frank

        Stefan you are Swedish, do you remember that? stop be a wannabe chinese

      • Gordon Gogodancer

        Are you for real?

      • wes707

        Stefan, why don’t you renounce your Swedish citizenship and go join your comrades?

        • Stefan

          It’s difficult if not impossible to get a Chinese citizenship or permanent residence…

          • wes707

            Are your parents Chinese nationals? I guess they’re 汉奸 if they gave it up to become Swedish.

            Article 5: Any person born abroad whose parents are both Chinese nationals or one of whose parents is a Chinese national shall have Chinese nationality. But a person whose parents are both Chinese nationals and have both settled abroad, or one of whose parents is a Chinese national and has settled abroad, and who has acquired foreign nationality at birth shall not have Chinese nationality.

          • Stefan

            No, the closest is my great grandparents on my mother’s side were born in China before the fled to Malaysia during the WW2. My mom is Malaysian Chinese.

            My father is born in Sweden to Finnish parents.

            I was born in Saudi Arabia though…

          • wes707

            I bet if you publicly swear allegiance to the Party and denounce the capitalist dogs, they might consider you for domestic PR reasons.

      • bprichard

        I would have been kicked out of school for my performance on the tennis team had anyone thought my tennis matches represented the honor of the school.

        • Stefan

          So you were not that good? If you were good then wouldn’t the school be happy for your performance that increased the reputation of the school?

    • Reptilian

      The near-fascistic spirit of pride and struggle that the CPC has ingrained into every social stratum in China….applied to the school spirit, that’s what

      • wes707

        I don’t think it’s near-fascistic – fascism is alive and well in China. People should call it for what it is. If you can read Chinese, just go on http://www.huanqiu.com/ and read the top comments.

      • Mihel

        I don’t know how fascism applies in China’s youth today, but I can see that several people who were young during fascism here in Italy show similar fits of “pride” from time to time, were they talk and act like they have to valiantly struggle against some perilous foe.

  • lacompacida

    US and other western countries should encourage PRC to continue, if not expend and deepen this type of education and examination systems. It is so great that it creates the kind of Chinese workers the west wants.

    • Don’t Believe the Hype

      Nobody except the PRC gov’t wants the young generation of Chinese to think like robots. so they can manipulate their minds. I can’t think of any other explanation.
      I can’t speak for all westerners either, but those who I know think that young mainlanders deserve more from their education system.

    • Stefan Xu

      So westerners don’t need to work?

      • KamikaziPilot

        I think he’s saying so that westerners can be the bosses and make all the money while they use the Chinese like drones to make they products they want to sell.

  • IsurvivedChina

    Didn’t they try kind of education before? As I remember it didn’t work out to well for them!

    • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

      And here I was thinking they all had their hands up because they knew the answers and were saying “Please Miss, please! Pick me!”

  • ClausRasmussen

    >> For college, for honor, for parents, for teachers, fight, fight, fight!

    “For the revolution, for the party, for Mao, for China, fight, fight, fight !”

    Wait… what century are we in ?

    • Stefan Xu

      What’s wrong with having some motivational spirit? In the meanwhile westerners just party every two days…

      • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

        You should know, you’re a westerner yourself.

        Sadly, I don’t party as often as you describe, what with work, wife, kid, etc. Actually, I don’t party at all… :(

        • Surfeit

          There’s a party in my pants and you’re invited.

      • nickhz

        are you just repeating the same nonsense over and over again?

        • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

          It’s what he does.

      • Surfeit

        Yeah! WHOOO!

    • Insomnicide

      Well…it’s a lot more acceptable to mainstream society than “Expel the Tartar barbarians, oppose the Qing and restore the MIng.”

    • Surfeit

      Is that what they said? Holy shit!

  • wil2197

    Now that’s the kind of Communism I miss seeing.

    And I thought it only existed in North Korea.

  • Markus Peg

    Too much pressure goes into exams in many countries, but with such a high population it is even more pressure for the Chinese students. Is it really needed to be done this way? China is not alone in hating their own education system and exam pressures… More everyday practical knowledge is needed. As far as i know, the world still has yet to come up with a new way of testing and moving up in education that can work in a whole nation (not just a one off school).

  • Markus Peg

    After Gao Kao comes the real life battle royale on the Diaoyu / Senkaku Island.
    Chinese and Japanese students fight for their nation, schools and parents.
    [Sorry for the childish comment, i could not resist it]

  • Stefan Xu

    China is at the top in the PISA test…
    China is the world’s fastest growing major economy…

    So apparently they are doing something right.

    • wes707

      It’s interesting to note that despite the PISA score, China has 0/100 of the world’s top ranked universities; that’s according to their own study. Puzzling isn’t it? Mindless rote learning has its drawbacks.
      http://www.shanghairanking.com/ARWU2013.html

      • Reptilian

        But—and this is of paramount importance, according to Stefan—”In the meanwhile western students just party every two days..is that really better?”

    • KamikaziPilot

      China? You mean Shanghai. Shanghai definitely does not equal all of China. Besides test scores don’t mean you can do well in the real world, they just mean you know the material that is being tested.

      • Stefan Xu

        The other provinces perform close to Shanghai, some even better.

        There are some latest results leaking from Chinese media. Zhejiang participated PISA 2012 and achieved quite good results (623 in math, 570 in reading, and 582 in science). Even better than Shanghai!

        However, the sample of students are somewhat biased, 80% of students tested were from rural area and all elite schools were excluded in the test. Zhejiang has a population of 55 million and urbanization rate of 62% and GDP per capita of around 15000 USD.

        http://zjnews.zjol.com.cn/system/2013/12/07/019746149.shtml

        • KamikaziPilot

          I can’t read that but I’m pretty sure if the rest of China took the same test they wouldn’t score nearly as high as Shanghai. Besides all these results should be taken with a grain of salt since we also don’t know how other countries are reporting their information too. I’m more concerned with “real world” examples of successes (ex. per capita GDP, leaders in industries, even immigration rates) than academic test scores.

          • Cameron

            And of course there is absolutely no possibility that mass cheating/prepping for the tests was taking place in the Shanghai schools. None at all, as that would never happen in China.

        • Cameron

          And yet this nation of Geniuses is relying exclusively on piggybacking on Western markets and Western innovations to drag itself out of poverty. Take a leaf out of the sensible commentators above book – climbing to number 90 or whatever in GDP per spite is nothing to shout about. China stillhas a hell of a lot of catching up to do and if it were left to people with your arrogance and idiocy (Chinese Education is The Best Man) it would never have even got this far

        • noodles76

          And those handpicked PISA scores produce what exactly? Even after they finish University in…engineering…for example. They are still considered unemployable by many international companies. China may produce more engineering graduates than any other country and pat themselves on the back for that but it has little meaning. Just like when China pats itself on the back for having a high GDP while ignoring GDP per capita. In China, a floor cleaner is an ‘engineer’. Sure China churns out a lot of engineers yet somehow…I’m not impressed.

          http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/global-challenge-training-engineers-21st-century

        • Reptilian

          In the meanwhile western students just party every two days..is that better???

  • Probotector

    For those of you that have known me of old, I am devastated to inform you that my unborn daughter died yesterday. There was an abruption of the placenta and she drowned in the amniotic fluid. There were only four weeks left until she was due to be born. This will be my final comment on chinasmack.

    • Germandude

      My condolences. Take good care of your wife and be strong for her and for yourself. All the best for the future and remember:
      “Who fights, can lose. Who doesn’t fight, already lost.”
      Take care man.

    • moop

      my sincere condolences. we lost our baby at the beginning of march. i hope you have all the support you need. if you live in beijing you can have chinasmack give you my contact details

    • noodles76

      Very sorry to hear that. My best wishes to you and your family.

    • Zappa Frank

      condolences..

    • Wa

      My deepest condolences. If you are struggling to find a voice for your grief, I would counsel you to turn to Paul Celan’s “Epitaph for Francois”.

    • mr.wiener

      Bummer…That really sucks. I hope you and the missus come through this ok . Really sorry to hear that bro.

    • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

      My sincere condolences. Take care of yourself and your wife. You both need to be strong.

    • I am so so sorry to hear that this has happened to you. Please be strong.
      I hope you find the strength to bear her loss and keep all that may have been,in your heart and learn to smile again.Ill pray for you and your family that you may find peace.Be strong Probotector.

    • ex-expat

      My condolences as well.

    • North-eastern

      I am deeply sorry, mate.

    • Guest23

      Condolences to both you and your wife, real sorry about this and take care.

  • Cameron

    For Parents bragging rights and pensions fund!!!
    For Teachers Bonuses!!!
    For China’s Standing on the World Stage!!!!!

    learn students learn!!!

  • Cameron

    Every man and his dog in China can see that the Education System is fucked . And year on year nothing changes. Who benefits. Well the people fucking hate it, but the Party says “it’s all good” and thus IT IS GOOD as The People (Capital Letters) have spoken through the voice of the Party. Hallelujah!!!!

    • Stefan Xu

      Doesn’t the party represent the people?

      • hess

        I hope you’re being sarcastic..

      • Reptilian

        In the meanwhile western students just party every two days..is that better?

  • Zappa Frank

    Yeah, because foreigners companies produce in china for chinese high skills impossible to find anywhere else..
    ..actually those skills are something like work 12/24h and 6/7 days a week. with a miserable salary. Is this what they learnt in high schools?

  • Cameron

    You seemed to have missed the point. The average 17/18 year old high school student could kick his UK/US equivalent ass at maths/science.

    The average 21/22 year old Chinese Maths university major however is no better than his western counterpart. And the ones that are top notch leave China to study in world class institions in the US and Europe. Chinese schools – and more importantly, universities, are a factories that stifle innovation.

    Post WW2 the Japanese economy grew thanks to a technologically advanced economy. Look at the dozens of high quality household Japanese brands today. Where are the Chinese equivalents? Matching what Japan achieved with Chinas Communist system – whichis by its natire averse to fostering independent, innovative and creative thinkers will be very, very difficult.

    • grand

      this is hilarious. as famed US investor jim rogers said recently, the UK has nothing to sell to the world and is, in his words, “finished”. at least china doesn’t have an unemployment of over 20% like many parts of europe.

      china doesn’t have to prove anything to you as it is already world’s largest exporter with export growth still growing at an average of 10% per year.

      • Zappa Frank

        services are nothing? because this is what developed economies sell…
        of course the unemployment rate is different with almost no labour rights, on the other side an unemployed in europe live by far better than most employed in china.

        • grand

          okay if you call waiting on tables, working at night clubs, or working in fast-food chains a dream job, because that’s what most so-called “service jobs” are. open your eyes to reality please. not everybody can be lawyers, bankers, or accountants.

          • Zappa Frank

            i don’t think you have a clear idea of what you are talking about…those are ‘service jobs’ for you? no.. besides are not services that you can sell abroad..
            can’t anyone be a clerk? because in europe actually this is what happen, most people work in offices..and they do sell serivces, like insurances, banks, maritime companies, freightforwarders, and so on…

          • grand

            precisely my point. most service sector jobs are low paying jobs like waiting tables, cleaning hotels rooms, working at fast food chains, other shops etc.

            to answer your questions, everyone can’t be clerks. and that’s not what is happening in europe. 20% unemployment is what ‘s happening in europe, 40% youth unemployment is what’s happening in europe. most young people with university degrees are working on low-paying part-time service jobs such as waiting tables is what’s happening in europe. debt is still piling up is what’s happening in europe.

          • Zappa Frank

            again, to serve at bar is not part of services … german told you.

            20% of unemployment come from where? statistic please.. this is simply false….

            http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disoccupazione_nell'Unione_europea

            you don’t really know anything about europe don’t you, just take here and there some voices.

            Young people with university degree may struggle to find a job, still to ba waiter is a better job than many engineer in china. Living condition better by far…

            And yes, everyone can be a clerk in europe, that’s the way things are moving. No, is not required a university degree to do it.

            keep in mind, china is not actually competing with skills acquired trough study.. but just with cheap labor force, government investments and so on. All research centers of those Europeans companies (and even some Asians) are still in Europe..

          • grand

            europe, though is in financial turmoil, is a developed area. it’s true that they are high earners based on dollar terms. but this fail to take into account the high price level in europe.

            i’ve been to europe i know what it was like. with 4000 yuan a person can live quite comfortably in many parts of china, but you can’t survive with 4000 yuan in europe. everything is so much cheaper in china. food, rent, public transport, the daily essentials etc. usually 5-10 times cheaper than in europe.

            i agree with you that china still not a high-end exporter like south korea, japan or Germany, but if you compare the composition of china’s export today to ten years ago, you will find instead of low-end export such as apparel, shoes, toys, etc, china’s main export now is machinery, electronics, high techs etcs.

          • Zappa Frank

            Please….you’ve been in Europe? How long? Two weeks? 3months? And you can talk about Europe economics problems?
            Again…living standards are by far high above the Chinese… An unemployed in Europe live at a level unthinkable by most employed in china. You don’ t have to struggle for health care, instructions, there are social houses and so on… I don’ t think you have any idea..
            What I said has nothing to do with what you reply… I said china is still exporting products that are projected somewhere else.. Just a factory. China do not use any of the mighty knowledge that for you are linked with the gaokao pressure… China export is based on cheap labor..

          • xiaode

            Sorry, but this is just wrong! Because you don´t compare on the same quality / standard level!
            If you want to live on EU standards living in China is so much more expensive then in Germany (for example).

            Pls. show me a apartment (between 60 and 100m^2) somewhere in China with insulated walls and windows according to German standards, with a noise level inside according to German standards – for let´s say 4000 RMB (without electricity, gas, water)
            I can show you (not in Munich, Hamburg, Frankfurt but other regions) apartments to rent for 500,- Euro (cold)!
            (The apartment I am living in SH is 3 times more expensive then the one I lived in Germany and it´s not even close in quality (construction, noise, insulation, all installations inside))

            Pls. show me a restaurant somewhere in China where I can get a complete dish for myself for about 10 Euro – where the restaurant could reach German standards! (Local owned restaurant, not big (foreign owned) brands)

            You can simply not compare these standards!

          • Germandude

            with 4000 yuan a person can live quite comfortably in many parts of china, but you can’t survive with 4000 yuan in europe

            You do understand that 4000 yuan/month is about the sum most European governments give to unemployed people, ADDITIONALLY after housing has been sponsored already?

            Let’s make a reality check and compare average salaries (source from 2011), your RMB 4000 should be acceptable considering salary increases since ’11)

            http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2012-07/06/content_15555503.htm

            Now Germany

            http://www.salaryexplorer.com/salary-survey.php?loc=81&loctype=1

            Obviously, these are pre-tax salaries. Average EUR 4012 pre-tax, so make that roughly EUR 2400 net (or RMB 20,400).

            Now if you are unemployed in Germany, France or Italy, you are receiving approx. the same money for personal usage as if you were an average worker in China. And that is ADDITIONALLY to your housing.

            By the way, I don’t disagree with you at all that manufacturing is an essential part of a healthy economy. Healthy economies stand on different feet.

            And last but not least, regarding the Rhine river pollution.

            http://logowater.iclei-europe.org/fileadmin/user_upload/logowater/wp4/D4.1_German_Rhine_Report_final.pdf

            The river is basically completely restored in water quality and actually China’s go to example when it comes to fighting river pollution in China (one day).

          • ex-expat

            I can go and survive in Ghana for 1/10 of that…that doesn’t mean anything.

          • Wololoo

            Living in China is just cheaper, when you do not expect any living quality.
            Actually buying Cheese, any kind of dairy, cakes or even European quality meat dishes or good pasta/ pizza is way more expensive in China than in Europe.
            The same goes for the flat: If you want to live in a small apartment with squatting toilet, paper walls and freezing in winter, it might be cheap, but as soon as you want to live in a better quality house with good public transportation connection, you pay equal or even more than in Europe (and than you are a subject to the lawless landlord/renter relationship).
            Good Cars are cheaper in Europe (gas is more expensive in Europe though).
            Healthcare like in Europe is really expensive in China (just offered in private cliniques), and let us be honest, no one really wants to go to a smoking Chinese doctor, that just gives you an IV-drip or sells you useless pills from the company he got bribed before from.

          • Germandude

            “The hospitality sector includes establishments that provide consumers with food, beverages and accommodation such as restaurants, bars and hotels.”

            http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-different-types-of-service-industry-jobs.htm

            “Countries with primarily service-based economies are considered to be more advanced than countries with primarily industrial or agricultural economies.”

            http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/service-sector.asp

            Tough luck if one fails on the easiest spots of reality already, right, @grand:disqus ?

          • grand

            once again you’ve managed to make a fool out of yourself. read and comprehend what i was saying okay? frank said that some countries “export service” and i was pointing out that most service jobs are domestic in nature, and are low paying jobs, which is a fact that you should learn. “service export” is a joke, hence those countries are running huge trade deficit and are going bankrupt. if export services are so successful and profitable for these countries, why do they have 20% unemployment rate?

            secondly, more and more economists are realizing the fact that manufacture is a crucial part of a economy. why do you think the US is desperately trying to revive its manufacturing sector?

          • noodles76

            You are undereducated. Service jobs include things like IT, education, financial services….and so on.

            IBM is a service company…what do you have to compete with that?

          • Dick Leigh

            Wait what? You don’t even know what the service sector encompasses but you’re arguing against it? Education is part of the service sector too, and you know the saying, “those that can’t do, teach”.

        • masonman

          “an unemployed in europe live by far better than most employed in china.”

          That is because China’s massive increase in capital goods only occurred in the last decade or so. All economies become wealthier ONLY by increases in capital goods. People in China are also getting out of really bad poverty (living on 2 dollars a day or less, something like that) at one of the highest rates in the world.

      • noodles76

        Yes, China does indeed have a lot to prove to the world.

        Despite what you have been led to believe, China is not the center of the universe. China has been relying on it’s huge population to try and gain sway in the world community (look at our GDP!!) yet it has produced…little of note. Do you want the world to thank you for producing and exporting worthless products for less than other countries are willing to do so? Ok. Thanks China for being willing to work for less than other countries and for sacrificing your environment to do so. My sincere thanks go out to China and it’s people for that. Any worthwhile product made in China is done so under a company that is not Chinese.

        Tell me…
        Is there an automobile made in China by a Chinese company that is sold outside of China? Is there a high speed train made in China and designed by Chinese engineers? Plane? Any computer software or hardware? What has China contributed to the world besides a large population? Oh! You made the world’s largest dam…..and displaced 1.4m people to do so and also created an unstable environment..landslides, tremors… GO CHINA!

        As to the unemployment rate…I don’t believe the figures from any country regarding that statistic. Far less so China which does not have any history of transparency or openness.

        Long story short, yes China has a lot to prove to the world. It has to prove it’s worthy of being labelled as the superpower it pretends to be. Quite frankly, the world sees China as greater than it actually is.

        • grand

          lol. i never said china is the centre of the world, you did.

          never heard of china exporting autos? well that just means you are ignorant.

          China Ramps Up Auto Exportshttp://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303978104577363790960231670

          Chinese automaker ready to tap Brazilian market
          http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2013-06/07/content_16586673.htm

          pollution is nothing new for country going through rapid growth. smog in london killed tens of thouands of people, i don’t think china is as bad yet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Smog

          what about the rhine river pollution?
          http://www1.wlsh.tyc.edu.tw/~globalschoolnet/a12.html

          • Zappa Frank

            with the difference that before people did not know how dangerous pollution is.
            china export cheap cars in emerging countries, in the most competitive market (Europe) they are absent.. just to say about the quality..

          • Stefan Xu

            They are coming to Europe when they’ve catched up, wait 5 years.

          • noodles76

            catched up? really? I hate to be the grammar nazi but I thought being educated in Sweden would prevent you from writing such things.

          • Stefan

            ok, caught up, I was writing in a hurry…

          • franko

            That explains why you are so anti-Europe, you were raised in Sweden, which does not offer its citizens a sense of pride and healthy nationalism. In Italy, the Chinese born here sing the national anthem very loud.

          • Zappa Frank

            They came already…with a lot of laugh.. And they came 10 years ago at least.. Even in china they don’t want Chinese cars

          • noodles76

            Actually, I said it WASN’T the center of the universe. As to exporting autos……your first link is broken but I found it online anyway. Yes, China exports autos to second or third world countries. As usual, they can only compete by being the least expensive.

            (not sure how to use quotes here so….this be a quote from one of the articles the other dude linked)
            Dogged by a reputation for low quality and poor customer service, China’s auto makers increasingly have had to compete on price…..
            “The type of lower quality car that comes from China just isn’t viable
            for North America or Europe unless it is a specialty vehicle filling a
            niche,” said Rudy Schlais,a former senior GM executive who runs Shanghai consultancy ASL
            Automobile Science and Technology.(and this be the end of a quote)

            As to your links on pollution….unusual weather events caused that spat of pollution in London. Yet, every year it’s the same here. I guess you didn’t bother to read what you linked. 4 days of intense pollution levels vs……well…China. Great way to argue a point I never even made. I never compared pollution levels in various countries. But you still failed to disprove a point I did not even make. Way to go guy!

          • grand

            again this shows your ignorance. london’s air pollution problems lasted for two decades. that incident i quoted was one extreme episode that killed a lot of people. try doing a little research before posting.

          • noodles76

            I was responding directly to what you linked. Either way, I never compared pollution levels in the original post I made to you did I? Grats on being retarded.

            Go ahead and try to prove any of my main points as incorrect. You can’t….so instead you try to change the goalposts.

          • grand

            i fail to see your main point. all i see is incoherent babbling, lol!

          • noodles76

            ……and that shows your level of intelligence. Done with you. You’re a waste of time.

          • grand

            lol.
            let me see. you said china doesn’t export auto, i gave you links that china in fact does export a great deal of auto and trucks and made you look like a fool.

            you said london’s pollution problems was an isolated incident that lasted only three days. i corrected you with the fact that the air pollution problem for london persisted for two decades and what i quoted was an extreme episode of it. again you embarrassed yourself. i was trying to save you from embarrassing yourself even further.

          • Guang Xiang

            And, ladies and gentlemen, is how a Chinese “debates” an issue.

          • grand

            lol, can you even read?

          • ex-expat

            Hence, the Chinese education system.

        • Stefan Xu

          China has many car companies selling good in developing countries around the world like Great wall motors, chery, geely, changan etc.

          • noodles76

            If you mean ‘selling good’ to be selling in underdeveloped countries where the only concern is price…then OK. You win. Nobody will argue with the fact that China can produce a random pile of crap for less than other countries.

          • IsurvivedChina

            the nickname for the The great wall in some countries right now is “Great Wall of Crap”. They fall apart!

        • You can buy Great Wall cars in Australia and their utes and trucks sell eel, are cheap and equally soid as the local and jap offerings.

          • Zappa Frank

            great wall cars use old mitshbishi engines and their project is mostly copied as well.. Japs cars are on complete different level (probably the best in the world)..

          • fabulous

            If you buy a Great Wall in Australia.
            If you buy a Great Wall in Australia you may be paying 5k less than the nearest rival but that saved 5k is wasted on constant, constant maintenance and almost zero trade-in value.

            The car doesn’t even have a clock.
            That shows how the car has been put together. A series of disconnected features borrowed from other manufacturers, cobbled together with little respect for the actual driving experience.
            I sat in my brother’s car which looked like an episode of Family Guy; where a meaningful storyline takes a backseat to pop-culture references, and asked myself how much fun it is to check your phone for the time while driving down the freeway.

          • noodles76

            I stand corrected in regard to my earlier remark about Chinese autos not being sold outside of China. I will however dispute your point about them being ‘solid’. 3 models from GW were safety tested by ANCAP. 2 were awarded 2 stars. The highest rated GW auto got a rating of 4 stars…the lowest rated autos from Mitsu/Honda/Toyota were also given 4 stars with the overwhelming majority at a 5 star rating. Perhaps we have a different definition of solid. The GW car with the 4 star rating has been banned from Australia since November first of last year because it does not have Electronic Stability Control. It was a speedy little bugger though…0-100km/h (or roughly 60mph) in uh….20 seconds…..That leaves 2 GW vehicles on the Australian market….those would be the ones that got only a 2 star safety rating. Hmmm….

            The Chery J1 was also forced out of Australia for the same reason. It had a 2 star safety rating. That leaves Chery with one model in Aus and it has 3 out of 5 stars from ANCAP.

      • Dick Leigh

        So you consider a Chinese peasant to be gainfully employed? Ah, no wonder the unemployment rate is so low. Can’t Europe just adopt the Chinese model and turn 1/3 of the population into subsistance farmers then?

    • Brian227

      The average Chinese graduate comes abroad to study at postgraduate level because in a very few cases they’ve got into one of the global elite universities but in the main because getting into a Masters programme in China is just too damned difficult. The very best and brightest stay at home where they can make connections amongst teachers and classmates that they’ll miss out on if they study abroad.

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        The best and brightest go abroad and don’t come back. Otherwise they wouldn’t be the best and brightest.

        • Brian227

          Of course! The very definition of ‘best and brightest’ means ‘want to be small fish in a big pond’ rather than ‘big fish’ back home. It’s all so clear to me now.

          • Don’t Believe the Hype

            “small fish in a big pond”
            More like “the frog in the well knows nothing of the great ocean”

          • Brian227

            Or the only job market consisting of 1/5th of the sum total of humanity is probably going to offer the best opportunities for those who can make it to the top. Or even somewhere near the top.

  • Cameron

    There’s no such thing as Chinese ethnicity. As we all know there are 56 Ethnic groups in China. Is every single ethnicity intelectually superior to every ethnicity outside of China? How convenient!

    Or by Chinese, do you merely mean Han, excluding the other 55 groups from Chineseness?

    (Btw, IQ tests are a nonsense)

  • Zappa Frank

    Chinese are great in tests. they study to pass tests but not to apply knowledge.. too bad the world doesn’t work with tests.

  • Zappa Frank

    Do china with forced study and easy univeristies has an higher rate of people with university degree? because if not really again you don’t show any good point with the forced study..
    By the way i know a lot that got a better education in high schools than in some chinese universities..
    But let’s see some also some negative points of the forced study and reduced social life… Like the social problems that many chiense face, few friends, many troubles to find a partner, lack of social skills, a rigid system that basically decide your life in one exam, pression from the very childhood while other child in the world do have a happy life..

    • Stefan Xu

      It’s Asian culture to study hard and to take school seriously, it’s in our genes, I grew up in Sweden but still have reduced social life, no friends, (had) trouble to find a partner, lack of social skills. I studied while my classmates were partying on weekends. But I was one of the top performers in my school.

      • noodles76

        In your genes? You’re one of the top performers at your school and say that it’s in your genes to study? That does not compute. I’d also hazard a guess (based on your postings here) that genetics is not to blame for your lack of social skills nor for your failure to find a partner.

        • Stefan

          What do you mean by this “I’d also hazard a guess (based on your postings here) that genetics is also not to blame for your lack of social skills nor for your failure to find a partner.”

          You mean because of my stupid posts I’m actually a stupid failure that don’t can’t find a partner?

          • noodles76

            You sir…took the ball and ran with it. Well done.

          • Stefan

            I actually have a girlfriend, I have some friends, I prefer to do sports than partying though, I played at junior elite level football and hockey, so I’m no failure I think.

          • noodles76

            You said you have limited social skills and no friends. If having no friends does not make one a failure…..what does? How could you manage to play sports and not end up with any friends? I…don’t get it.

          • Stefan

            Maybe I’m not the most social person but I still have some friends.

          • IsurvivedChina

            I don’t think any one here wants to hear your whuddysack confirmations!

      • Guang Xiang

        The top of our class has high GPA, gets national record in swimming for his age group, popular with the ladies, and parties a lot. He’s Chinese with American characteristics. He was able to get free ride to Stanford. Top schools reject high GPA if you have no life.

        • Stefan

          Is he popular with non-Asian girls? Because non-Asian girls don’t like Asian guys…

          • noodles76

            Don’t drop a generalization like that just because you can’t find a partner. There are plenty of Asian guys with non-Asian women. Just because you strike out does not mean all Asian guys do.

            Sour grapes.

        • Stefan

          I have a girlfriend. I have some friends, I prefer to do sports than partying though, I played at junior elite level football and hockey, I have a job, so I think I have some kind of life I think.

          • noodles76

            Yet earlier you said….

            I grew up in Sweden but still have reduced social life, no friends, (had) trouble to find a partner, lack of social skills.

            Did you make friends since you posted that perhaps? Good for you!!

          • Stefan

            ok, I exaggerated a bit on that post…

          • noodles76

            …on that post. As if it was an isolated incident….

            You also said..
            non-Asian girls don’t like Asian guys…

            Did you exaggerate again? Don’t be shy. Admit it like an adult would and then we can go share a cheeseburger and be friends.

          • Stefan

            The posts I made on this article is also a bit exaggerated, my honest opinion is that the Chinese education system definitely needs some improvement.

            Regarding the non-Asian girls don’t like Asian guys…

            Actually although there are many Asian guys with non Asian girls they are still few compared to how many Asian girls and non Asian guys, generally it’s one of the more unusual couples you’ll see in the west. And when you search on the internet White and Latino girls don’t really find Asian guys the most appealing guys on the planet…

      • Zappa Frank

        You are not even asian…what are you talking about? Your genes? So how come abc are not all like that, nor all Chinese? Please stefano….you lack of social skill because you are insecure as few

  • Don’t Believe the Hype

    wow troll alert

  • mr.wiener

    Apparently the ethnicity? group? cultural entity? with the highest IQ are ashkenazi Jews.
    IQ and creativity are also 2 different things.

  • wes707

    Hi Bob, do you know anything about the development of IQ tests or other psychometric testing methods? You should really look into it. Start with “The Mismeasure of Man” by Harvard evolutionary biologist, paleontologist, and historian of science Stephen Jay Gould. IQ tests were never meant to define intelligence. This has been misconstrued by people like you, but I guess “Chinese” have been lacking in the critical thinking department for some time now.

    Also, nice to see Stefan upvoting this. I thought you said you were not a Chinese tribalist?

  • fabulous

    The Japanese have a culture of excellence.
    The Chinese have a culture of looking excellent.

  • Subhajit

    From the slogans of the students indicating that they demanding for successing but not for excelence, if they run behind success, nothing can be achieved, so need to follow the excelence, then success follow them, should need to bring excelence not only for school or college or for parents or for nation but also for ownself and for own satisfaction by which they can do in future something great one for this world and for the humanity by their own way, not to borrow from other.

  • Insomnicide

    There’s nothing I can say that hasn’t already been said, so here’s a funny image.

  • Dick Leigh

    NO UR AN IDIOT. Way to be classy mate.

  • Surfeit

    That’s a great anecdote at the end.

  • Surfeit

    “These gestures look like the Germans in WWII.”

    I’m going with Jesse Owens myself. Fist pumps!!!!!

  • Surfeit

    You have me in stitches!

  • ScottLoar

    “This kind of education system cannot produce innovative talent,
    but instead obedient and disciplined [able to follow guidelines]
    children. China’s students are only good at taking tests.”

    This comment is a fair and typical summation of that I hear from Korean, mainland Chinese and Taiwanese college and graduate students, as well as fathers and mothers, because the education and examinations are greatly based on rote learning and mathematical computation at the expense of rhetorical expression or deductive logic. I invite comments to the contrary.

    Local people no matter educators or those being educated seem to know the system is wrong, I was repeatedly told so even in the 70’s in Taiwan, yet unable to reform it of habit and content. By contrast a quite good mainland Chinese artist I know noted that her experience of arts education in the US showed the US students to be very creative and bold but severely lacking in technical background. This is a valid criticism: I witness the same here among persons glibly advancing opinions on Chinese subjects in which they clearly lack background and understanding. Also, the canon of common reference once typical to Western education is mostly unread and untaught like that of China’s. As example and consequence, I don’t see how most people can understand the references and jokes coming fast and furious in The Simpsons.

  • Vernon Alarcon

    Chinese education beez awesome! not like USA where niggas cant even spell da words dat dey beez usin an sheeut……

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