Chinese Teachers In England Think British Students Are Lazy

Chinese Teachers In England Think British Students Are Lazy
Five Chinese teachers went on exchange to Hampshire School in England for one month to see if the Chinese educational system can work in England or not. In the end they found British Students to be both rude and lazy. One Chinese teacher says that if the British government decreased welfare the young people would be forced to work because if they failed they wouldn’t have a safety net, and would treat everybody differently. Netizens don’t agree with the Chinese education system, saying that even though the students are like this England still has the best colleges in the world.
Source: Sina

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  • Zappa Frank

    i don’t think that chinese methods can work for people that have been rised in another way.

    • jin

      Raised Grammar Nazi passing through.

      • Bas

        Typo Nazi

        • jin

          Well yeah, wasn’t really failed grammer, just a typo.

      • Mihel

        lol bitch please.
        If you’re going to go all grammar nazi on people at least go correct native speaker who make the most retard mistakes such as their/they’re, your/you’re, defiantly/definitely, should of/should have.

        • Alex Dương

          Plenty of native speakers get their/they’re, your/you’re, and should of/should have mixed up, but anecdotally, the ones I’ve seen mix defiantly/definitely are non-native speakers.

          • Mihel

            Anecdotally I’ve seen the ones that mix defiantly/definitely are still native speakers.
            I guess it’s because they have a similar pronunciation, and native speaker learn new words by hearing them, so it’s easier to mix them up; while non-native learn them by reading them, they learn words by their meaning not by the way they sound, and do not mix them up as frequently.
            Again, anecdotally I’ve seen the most common mistakes for non-native speakers are false friends and shitty grammar.

          • Alex Dương

            Their/they’re and your/you’re definitely sound alike. I agree that native speakers who were poorly educated can easily mix these up because of their sounds. Should of/should’ve can sound alike if “should of” is spoken naturally, so I can see the mix up there too.

            I’m trying to think where in the U.S. definitely and defiantly would sound alike. When spoken naturally, the first “i” in “definitely” won’t be emphasized. I think the “fai” sound in defiantly is too strong to be mixed up with definitely, but my experience is limited to the U.S. Maybe the mix up is more common in other parts of the Anglosphere.

          • Mihel

            Imho it’s either:
            a) native speakers tend to naturally speak fast, thus some syllables in some words get “compressed” (a common type of mispronunciation that happens in spoken language, which does not necessarily denote illiteracy), children hearing those words will automatically register them in their brain with an incorrect spelling.
            b) people do systematically say defiantly instead of definitely, the children around them absorb the notion that ‘defiantly’ means what we intend as ‘definitely’.

            In either case it’s difficult to correct something that has been internalised from such a young age.
            Some people even consider rude when others point out their errors, and would continue using wrong spelling/grammar on purpose.

          • donscarletti

            Those two words sound nothing alike, they just look similar. The third syllable in particular in “defiantly” sounds like “ant” and in “definitely” sounds like a “nate” or “night” (depending on dialect). Secondly, the accent is on the “i” (eye) in “defiantly”, but is pronounced with a short “e” or even a schwa in “definitely” and the accent is on the second “i”.

            You are either dealing with someone who learned English by reading, or someone using their phone’s autocorrect to write. This is not a common malapropism for a native speaker.

            Native speakers mostly mix up words separated by single vowels (affect/effect, then/than) in both speech and writing and homophones (sore/saw/soar, their/there/they’re) in writing.

          • Mihel

            Not that I rule out the possibility that some non-native speakers also mix up definitely with defiantly, but I find improbable that people from many different countries would all misspell the same word in the same way.
            Do all francophones, sinophones, lusophones, hispanophones etc make the same type of misspellings with the same words?

          • donscarletti

            It comes from learning a word after you have learned to read fluently. Educated adults generally don’t look at each letter one by one, they just look at the shape of a whole word, especially near the beginning and end, enough to distinguish it from other words. It makes reading fast, but it makes similar words look the same. Learning a new word through reading, no matter if you are native or foreign, is likely to lead to uncertainty about the letter order around the middle of the word.

            Before television and radio, this was an extremely common problem for native speakers learning words that are not used in the household. Most jokes about malepropisms come from that era. These days though, mostly foreigners learn new words through reading, especially super common ones in speech like “definitely”. So it doesn’t really matter what your native language is, you are likely to make the same mistakes.

        • jin

          What’s the difference between defiantly/definitely and raised/rised?

          • Mihel

            Definitely = in a definitive way. In a way that is certain. “I’ll definitely go check this”
            Defiantly = in a defiant way. In a way that defies something. “Rebels defiantly ignore curfew”
            Raised = Someone/something raises someone/something. Transitive verb. “Minimum wage has been raised by government”
            Rised = I don’t think it exists. Probably an incorrect past tense of the verb To Rise.
            Risen = Someone/something rises himself/itself. Intransitive. “Whatshisface has risen to fame for his role in a Hollywood movie”

          • jin

            I know what they mean, but what I meant is that they’re written different. I just couldn’t stop myself from typing that.

      • Zappa Frank

        thanks for your correction.

  • Kellar

    The only reason the UK and the US are said to have the “best colleges in the world” is because they are English speaking. Guaranteed top universities in Spain or other non-English speaking countries are just as good. The ratings are done by the UK and the US anyways. It’s a biased assumption.

    • DD Bear!

      i agree with you!
      but only a bit!

      • Chris Bullock

        I agree too! More than a bit!

        • DD Bear!

          ha, you come out again!
          why not just hide well?

          • Chris Bullock

            I come out for a bit. Or a bite! Hungry!!

          • Chris Bullock

            I hide on the internet!

          • Chris Bullock

            亲爱的!!

          • DD Bear!

            stop this kinda silly online hooking up games

          • Chris Bullock

            I can’t

          • DD Bear!

            why?if you are so free and bored, why not find a girl there ?

          • Chris Bullock

            She does not have DD

          • DD Bear!

            and you do not have either????

          • Chris Bullock

            No, my chest is not DD

          • DD Bear!

            dd is cock to guys!

          • Chris Bullock

            Sorry, we don’t measure it that way.

          • Chris Bullock

            So your name is Cock Bear? Hahahaha

          • DD Bear!

            sillly idiot!

    • donscarletti

      Wherever you are in the world, any university where more than 70% of the teaching staff were born in the country that the university is in is a third rate, insular institution.

      In the majority of non-English speaking universities, this is the case, simply because the number of foreign academics that can speak any given language (apart from English) is relatively small. An English speaking institution can hire the best academics from a non English speaking country, whereas universities in that country can only hire their own.

      Not only that, but English speaking universities can hire better foreign faculty than non-English speaking universities, mostly because of the diversity of talent they can offer someone to work with. Just counting the Chinese professors I’ve had, they certainly were better than the professors I’ve heard about from my Chinese coworkers.

      This is why the best universities in mainland Europe and Macgill University in militantly French speaking Quebec all use English for most if not all of their classes. English is not necessarily a superior language for tuition, but it is a superior language for recruitment and that means more than anything.

      • David

        Thank you for saving me 10 minutes of typing.

    • Foreign Devil

      Forget the ratings. . look at which universities are leading in research and innovation. . .Most are probably in english countries.

      • David

        Although research universities are not always the best for undergraduate work (not necessarily bad, just not always the best), they are definitely where you want to be for grad and post grad studies and fellowships.

    • David

      I disagree with you more than a bit.

    • vonskippy

      Utter crap – show me what leading research is being done by any Spain Uni, show me the peer reviewed scientific papers coming out of a Spanish Uni, show me the number of patents a Spanish Uni has registered. Waiting….. Spanish Uni’s are third rate at best no matter what language they speak.

  • WghUk

    It was a huge topic here. Many Brits thought that the methods are too militaristic and simply don’t work in today’s classrooms.

    • LostRambler

      Not only would they not work but would most likely be counterproductive too. Brits are raised with individualistic attitudes esp post thatcher thus this lets do it because we’ve got no other choice attitude wouldn’t fly

  • Andy Mc Crab

    ROFL never work.

  • jin

    A huge problem with the western youth these days is the lack of discipline and respect.
    Don’t know if it’s the parent’s fault, bad education or media. Kids these days don’t talk polite to elders, lack of respect for girls, don’t respect the law, lack of respect for their parents (calling their parents by their name), make racial jokes (is and would be very racist if a grown up said it.)……….

    • Mihel

      Though I agree kids and adolescents are less respectful for elders and parents, I am fairly sure they’re less racist, sexist, homophobes and more law abiding than their parents and grandparent were when they were the same age.
      Back then there was a thicker coat of “politeness” painted over total lack of respect, and some types of crime were not reported.

      • jin

        You’re going waaaaay back, the things your grandparent experience is not what the youth experience. 100 years ago it was normal to be racist, normal for woman to be housewives, normal to despite people that are different. (Since everyone does it) Things that happens back then is normal/new/strange to them. Now in the 21th century we grow up in a world where racism is not accepted/ sexism is not accepted/ discimination is not accepted. So when a youth is being racism/ disrespectful or whatever, he is either raise improperly or not raised at all.

        • LostRambler

          You don’t have to go waaaay back to talk about rasicm/sexism or lack their of 50s/60s Britain and American are a prime example of the veneer of politness that Mihael is talking about. Everybody said they weren’t rascist but fought not to let black people vote or fought for women to stay home. And to say that a lot of things were new/strange to them is both insulting that generations ability to think and make decisions as well as ours to comprehend history in its given context.

          • Alex Dương

            It’s not clear to me that racists in the 1950s or 1960s (at least in the U.S.) denied being racist the way people today do.

          • Shepard

            Haha Yeah some people were proud of racists in the 50’s and 60’2. Just google any picture of school’s and universities during integration.

          • jin

            What I meant with new and strange are things like gays/woman doing “men’s” job….. things that are not normal for them was not accepted by them back then. We live in a multicultural society and are used to see different things, they didn’t. What’s normal for us now was abnormal for them back then. Because we live in such a society, we can easier adapt to new/strange things.
            Telling them to accept the blacks (ex slaves) is like saying that apes and humans are equal.(because they were superior) (No racist)
            Telling them to accept gays, woman rights and such is like telling the Chinese from 100years ago to accept the “White Devils”
            It’s the mentality they have, they grew up all their life believing that they are superior to the slaves, that this is right and that is wrong. It’s the society they lived in that made them think like that, if racism, discrimination and sexism are acceptable now, people would be a looooot more racist and sexist.

          • KamikaziPilot

            Yes, sometimes it’s unfair to judge the past by today’s standards. Ex. Were past slave owners anywhere in the world bad people because they owned slaves or were they decent people but just corrupted by the social norms of the time? Then again, there has to be a line drawn where certain behavior should be considered unacceptable despite what was the norm at the time. I guess for everyone that line is different.

        • Zappa Frank

          that’s because you think about US, like most, when you talk about westen people. The truth is that in many cases, outside of the US, is quite true what Mihel said. To be racist was and is quite normal and even socially acceptable in other countries… and even more outside europe.

          • KamikaziPilot

            True, Ex. to be racist in China is quite accepted and sometimes even praised. Just look at a certain poster on this website.

          • Zappa Frank

            Not only in China. We had a black minister that had been pictured as an ape, and even the people of his own party said it was a bad thing but not penalty relevant , while for other parties she was just too sensitive

  • Necrogodomega

    So the result was that the Chinese methods didn’t work (big fragging surprise) and the Chinese teachers in turned blamed the rude kids (cause you know those teachers were so polite) and also suggested that if the government treated everyone like a 3rd world slave the kids would work harder. Yep, that’s about right.

    Also, you can watch the whole video on youku. Those teachers have a bit of talent, but they are abusive and rude too. Plus the woman in the picture was totally “Pro CCP Divine-Mao” loving Chinese Party member that couldn’t understand why the Brits didn’t love the way of teaching like her students do.

    • ag13

      i watched ep1 last night, i think it is fun. and in fact the chinese teachers didn’t blame the kids, they are also learning the way to communicate with them.

    • helsic

      Wow, I want to watch the video, can you share the link? thanks

      • It’s just stupid anti-wits propaganda designed to promote Chinese-style slavery in Britain. Note they didn’t go to any of the thousands of majority non-White schools in Britain.

    • Teacher in China

      Yeah I watched the first episode. What a nightmare. The Chinese method doesn’t work at all. And I “loved” the comments from the teachers about how all the students in China are respectful and watch the teacher and learn everything so well. Maybe in the #1 high schools in each city with all the super smart and rich kids, yeah, but try teaching in ANY of the other schools and you will see a completely different situation. And you will also see teachers who don’t give a shit that 50% of the class is sleeping or playing on their phones. The Chinese way does not work for anyone other than the brightest and most motivated students.

    • Teacher in China

      Did you watch the second episode? It got even worse. Really funny, actually, to see how terribly the Chinese methods FAILS in every aspect. Also, quite a bit of bias coming into play from both sides, which is interesting. Should be at least one more episode coming in a few days.

  • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

    Why am I not surprised? In elementary school, kids are dickbags to each other and their peers, and it only gets worse by the teenage years. Then High school comes around and it becomes dickbag central, with only those who actually give a damn about their careers beyond cashing welfare checks making it to college.

    Yes I’m bitter, shut up.

  • xatziavatis

    “England still has the best colleges in the world.”
    Yes… but these are for the rich…

  • KamikaziPilot

    I wonder if those kids are thinking “what the hell am I doing”. I know that’s what I would be thinking.

  • Blue

    I was quite embarrassed watching it and getting flashbacks of being at school 25 years ago and it being almost identical. But also remember clearly how everyone matured at college and became excellent, driven students at university. The global testing was unfairly balanced in China, thanks to the actions and prerequisites demanded by the authorities. It gave a biased result which was not a factor in the other countries tested.
    I think the Chinese model is utterly flawed and severely hinders the emotional and social development of the kids, whilst maintaining collectiveness and unquestioned obedience as the cure all for society’s problems.
    The British system isn’t anywhere near perfect, and despite a healthy dose of personal national embarrassment, I do believe it’s a healthy system which encourages individuality, freedom of thought and personal growth, which I think at that age is more important than knowing Pythagoras’ rule.

  • garbo

    Chinese teachers expect students to be robots. They can give “knowledge” but most of the time they can’t explain why. They don’t seem to care if the students actually learn anything. I think that’s why the teens aren’t paying attention. Students are used to an interactive class. It was funny to see the headmaster giggling. The Chinese teachers can’t adapt and are to stubborn to change the way they’re teaching. Respect is earned not given . The teachers didn’t command students respect plus insulting them didn’t help. Did I hear the teacher right about kicking a student? That isn’t allowed , the teacher would be fired.
    I’ve had friends’ children visit schools in other countries now and they like the foreign schools better. They like the interaction and creativity.

  • dag

    Spend a month with foreign teachers teaching Chinese students English.

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