Woman Refuses to Turn Off Phone on Plane, Detained 5 Days

A woman's hand holds a white Apple iPhone next to an airplane window.

From NetEase:

Woman Who Ignored Instructions and Repeatedly Made Calls on Plane Detained for 5 Days

Beijing Times report — While on a flight from Changchun to Beijing, Yu X used her mobile phone to make calls multiple times. Not only did she ignore flight attendants who asked her sto stop, she also exhibited a nasty attitude refusing to turn off her phone. After the plane landed, she was was summoned to the police station. At present, Yu X has been given an administrative punishment of 5 days detention by the airport police.

Last year on December 28, Yu X took an Air China flight from Changchun to Beijing. Just as the plane was about to land, she took our her mobile phone and called those who would meet her at the airport. When flight attendants found out, the immediately went forward to stop her, but Yu X objected. It was only after the urging by surrounding passengers and flight attendants that she finally turned off her phone. However, not long after, Yu X again turned on her mobile phone to make a call. Flight attendants again approached her to stop her, but with a nasty attitude, Yu X refused to turn off her phone and even criticized the flight attendant for making a fuss about nothing. After multiple unsuccessful attempts to convince her to comply, flight attendants had no choice left but to report it to the police.

Beijing Capital International Airport Public Security Sub-Bureau [police] arrived on the scene after receiving the report and after the plane landed, they lawfully summoned Yu X to the eastern airport terminal police station for investigation. Under questioning by the police, Yu X still did not recognize the severity of her own misbehavior, claiming that she often makes calls on planes, has never been caught before, and believed there actually isn’t much [negative] effect from using a mobile phone on a plane.

It was only after the police explained the pros and cons that Yu X finally understood and confessed to her behavior. Police punished Yu X with an administrative detention of 5 days.

mobile-phone-apple-iphone-on-plane-02

Police Reminder

Making a phone call on a plane may result in civil prosecution

A senior Air China captain told this reporter that when he encountered a passenger using their mobile phone during landing, “I noticed something wrong with the instrument landing system”, because “the signal was not stable, with brief but major oscillations”, and had to land with the help of visual consultation [look out the window, not rely only on instruments]. He says the signal from mobile phones can interfere with on-board equipment. If this is combined with pilots being unable to see visually due to weather or other reasons and adjust for the deviations caused by signal interference, it can be an extremely big danger to the plane’s safety.

Airport police point out that according to regulations in the Law on Public Security Administration Punishments, using equipment that can interfere with the navigation systems used on an in-use aircraft and refusing to comply with instructions to stop shall be punished with detention lasting 5 days or less. According to provisions in the Civil Aviation Flight Regulations, using portable electronic equipment such as computers and mobile phones on a plane in violation of regulations can be punished with a 2000 yuan fine.

According to Civil Aviation Administration of China’s Public Security Bureau’s 174th Order, violators can also face civil prosecution by the airline. “Those who use mobile telephones and such remote controlled electronic devices in violation of regulations and persist despite the instructions and warnings of flight crew, their devices may be temporarily seized and confiscated. Those who have been instructed to stop but refuse shall be subdued and transferred to airport police for handling and subjected to lawful administrative detention as punishment; those who cause flight delays may be lawfully required to pay compensation for losses.”

Comments from NetEase:

网易广东省广州市手机网友 ip:119.130.*.*

Detained for 5 days. Could self-centered people like this, whose actions don’t consider other people’s personal safety, can it be considered harming public safety?

灬人艰不拆灬 [网易甘肃省手机网友]:

These kind of people are usually those who like to zhuang bi. The moment they get on a plane, they have all sorts of calls, all sorts of chats, all just to show that they have someone meeting them at the airport, how busy they are, when in reality they fucking don’t even take a plane more than a few times the entire year but finally they have such a rare opportunity to zhuang bi so they have to seize it!

游侠126 [网易新疆乌鲁木齐市网友]:

Both selfish and stubborn.

网易四川省宜宾市手机网友 ip:125.64.*.*

There are more and more people like this… I don’t know why! She should’ve been punished more severely! You don’t have to care about your life but what gives you the right to risk other people’s lives?! Ignorant people sure are scary!

游荡在非洲 [网易坦桑尼亚手机网友]:

People like this should be blacklisted, where no airline will let them fly in the future.

跟贴局特约洗脑员 [网易河南省郑州市手机网友]:

Making a call on a plane [飞机上打电话] and masturbating on the phone [电话上打飞机] are two different things. This woman’s bad habits haven’t been fixed. [This comment does not translate well.]

36bbb41287a349b076e68346 [网易河北省张家口市手机网友]:

For bad people to have money is truly a disgusting thing.

8c369c23f144dde45dec976e [网易河南省郑州市手机网友]:

Sigh, a Chinese person yet again, just when can [our countrymen’s] characters be improved?

拉登偷单车 [网易湖南省长沙市手机网友]:

Slut.

网易上海市手机网友 ip:180.154.*.*

Honestly, how is there that much bullshit to do when taking a flight?! And fucking calling the person picking you up at the airport, would it have killed you to wait a couple of minutes?

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  • Dax

    “Sigh, a Chinese person yet again, just when can [our countrymen’s] characters be improved?”

    When parents start disciplining their Little Emperors/Princesses and people stop worrying so much about everyone’s face and call them out when they’re being selfish dickheads.

    • Myke Tythin

      “chinese person yet again”, lol this is “Chinasmack” right?, not “Humansmack”

      • Alex

        That’s a quote from the chinese comments, retard.

    • Bodhidharma

      What if “Little Emperors/Princesses” are party offical’s ? or worse Heishehui’s ? there are reason for the caution.

    • 山炮 ShanPao

      Actually this is just another example of backward Chinese governance and regulation as much as it is about a selfish, discourteous population. In most developed countries you can now leave your mobile phone on whilst flying as it doesn’t make the slightest difference. However, it will be 10 years before the Chinese government allow such freedoms.

      http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29381193

      • NeverMind

        Most developed countries also tend to respect others’ convenience. You do not want 200+ people on a plane talking loudly on their phones (typical of developing countries) while their neighbor tries to catch a nap. So, I feel it is a good rule to have irrespective of whether it is not dangerous.

    • Zappa Frank

      it’s just statistic. the country with more people must be also the country with more idiots. For sure no one complain about the Lichtenstein people and for sure they have just few idiots.

    • NeverMind

      I’ve noticed that a lot of Chinese kids are now being raised by their grandparents, who pamper them and cater to all their demands. The parents tend to go to work usually in a neighboring city and only see their kids once in a week or so.

    • sudon’t

      Well, the woman is correct. There is no reason you should have to turn your cell phone off on a plane.

      • Marcus

        You sure look like you know what you’re talking about..

        • sudon’t

          Thank you! It’s probably because I do.

        • Rob

          There have been numerous studies showing that whether a cell phone is or isn’t on, there is zero negative impact on airplane instruments/communication, and has no bearing on safety whatsoever. It’s a courtesy issue for fellow passengers, nothing more.

  • Irvin

    I always thought the requirement of us turning off our phone was bullshit but I still turn it off anyway because it’s their plane, their rules. If you don’t like turning off the phone then take a fucking bus.

    • Teacher in China

      Yeah, exactly. Get away from your fucking phone for 5 god damn minutes – is it really that hard? How much you wanna bet that it was a fucking iPhone 6?

      • 宋易

        +!

      • KamikaziPilot

        Nah, iphone 6 is for pheasants, iphone 6 plus is what she got, gotta show off the latest and greatest phone money can buy. Make sure everyone can see the apple symbol.

        • Teacher in China

          Ha! Yeah, I forgot those existed. You are totally on the money there. btw, I think you mean “peasants” :)

          • KamikaziPilot

            Yeah, peasants, haha, I don’t think a pheasant will have much use for an iphone 6 plus or any other phone for that matter.

      • Zappa Frank

        can still be used in airplane mode to listen music or use other stuff….but not on Chinese airplanes..i wonder why.

        • Irvin

          Yeah, it sucks, we can’t even use our ipads or other electronics. I just hide mine until they pass just like primary school.

          • Munkee

            Do you mean during take off and landing? For I have never had any problem to use either my iPad, iPod or laptop when cruising…

          • Zappa Frank

            on Chinese airplanes is not allowed.

          • Munkee

            Well, I have taken many flights in China, with many airlines (China Eastern, Air China, China Southern, Spring Airlines, Shanghai Airlines, Juneyao Airlines, Hong Kong Airlines – if that counts) and not only have I always been able to use the above mentioned electronics in flight-mode while we were cruising, but they also mentioned that you could do so on the video detailing the safety instructions.
            The only devices prohibited during the whole flight (from closure to opening of the aircraft’s doors) are mobile phones and RC toys…

          • Zappa Frank

            I’ve always been told to turn it down and a friend of mine was told to turn down even the kindle. Maybe we’ve been unlucky and i misunderstood

          • Kai

            Did they ask you to turn those off “while cruising” or only during take-off and landing?

          • Zappa Frank

            while cruising, on landing or departure I didn’t even try since I knew already was forbidden. And with cruising I mean a 12h flight.

          • Kai

            Wow, that sucks balls. What airline was this? I don’t think I’ve yet run across an airline that forbids the use of flight-mode devices or Kindles during cruising.

          • Zappa Frank

            the airline was china eastern. The hostess didn’t let me use my phone in flight mode….maybe was my misunderstanding, but later a friend told me he had problems even with the kindle… I though it was a politic of Chinese air companies, I’m surprise to see that is not. But I’m a bit confused because Irvin apparently met the same problem.

          • Kai

            I’ve taken China Eastern a lot and don’t recall encountering this. Maybe it was a communication issue or maybe you ran into a dumbass flight attendant, or maybe their policies have changed? I have no idea. Hopefully it was an isolated incident and not some new policy. I suppose I haven’t flown China Eastern since…2012? 2013? Shrug.

          • Irvin

            There’re alot of dumbass attendant, the only qualification is they have to look presentable.

            I don’t think they’re paid alot either since they always look so grumpy and were available in dongguan for part time.

            At least their part time service was satisfactory, probably correlates directly to how much I paid them, 1200rmb for only 2 hrs………..

          • Irvin

            I don’t recall which airline, I usually just pick the cheapest fare online and buy it. I put the phone to airplane mode even before boarding.

            After take off, the hostess came over and told me to turn off the phone, I didn’t object and process to hold the power button to turn it off. She thought I was showing her that my phone was in plane mode and told me that wouldn’t do, I have to turn it off completely.

            Now I just play peek a boo with them when I fly.

      • jaded

        So many phone zombies these days. I have a smartphone too of course but I’m not glued to it as others are. Whatever happened to good old fashioned conversation?

      • NeverMind
  • Apothis

    Not a good month for Asian women….what”s up ladies? Success and perceived power going to your heads?

    • Byrnzie28

      They can accumulate as much money as they like, but they can’t buy class. They may be rich, but underneath their fur coats they’re still peasants with no manners, no decorum, and no common courtesy.

      • Teacher in China

        Dude, it’s like you read my mind. I live in a place with A LOT of new money, and I think that very same thing at least a half dozen times every day. Given this lady hails from a city next door to where I’m living, I can picture exactly what kind of person she is in my mind, and you hit the nail on the head.

      • Kai

        To play Devil’s Advocate, you actually CAN buy class. The trick is that you have to want to learn and then change aspects of your behavior that may have become habitual. A lot of nouveau riche just fall into the trap of buying the trappings of success thinking it sufficiently represents or conveys class.

        But again, just playing Devil’s Advocate. I share your prejudice against a lot of new money types.

      • ClausRasmussen

        I prefer new money lack of manner to old money arrogance any day

  • mr.wiener

    This is the kind of “ugly Chinese” other chinese people wil be making excuses for and apologising for ,for the next decade at least….I don’t envy them their lot.

    • Alex Dương

      Haha, hopefully only other people like her will defend her.

    • Free Man

      Its always sad seeing (supposedly) smart and educated people making (stupid) excuses (which usually are completely made up/bullshit) for people they even don’t know, just because they have the same nationality.

      Even more sad when your own family makes these excuses.

      • Alex Dương

        I don’t see any of the top NetEase commenters defending her. Maybe people in real life who are also like her would?

        • Free Man

          Maybe it’s a personal thing, but when i tell one chinese about other chinese people screwing up or doing anything stupid (i mean ANYTHING), they tend to defend other chinese people, sometimes with hilarious excuses. If you hear a friend you consider educated and well behaving making such excuses … just the wrong priorities IMHO.

          That came to head when I read mr.wiener’s “other chinese people wil be making excuses”.

          • Alex Dương

            I think it’s normal for people – no matter where they’re from – to be defensive if an “outsider” makes a criticism.

          • biggj

            “I don’t want no _______<—(insert racial slur here) talking shit about me and ma country!!!" haha

          • Alex Dương

            Basically. It can even be a criticism from someone of the same “race” who’s from another country. I’m sure some white Americans would respond with ‘MURICA if some white Canadians were talking shit about the U.S.

          • biggj

            America and China have to be the worst places i’ve been for blind nationalism. Not everyone, but I’ve talk to enough to see that these 2 countries are the worst for it….for places i’ve been. Now patriotism is everywhere I go. And it’s find to love your country. This pretty much sums it up “The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance.” I think blind arrogance fittingly describes china and america.

          • Alex Dương

            You don’t talk shit about ‘MURICA, you filthy Canuck you.

            jk

          • biggj

            That’s it!!! time to protest to the max!!!

          • Dr Sun

            is the the preview of the new moderation rules ???

            anything beyond this your banned !

          • biggj

            Do you know what the changes are? Can I still call people fuck tards?

          • bujiebuke

            Hey guys… does anyone know how we can verify if someone got banned or not? Just asking >_>

          • biggj

            I don’t think you can, I could be wrong though. Talking about Rick? I say he probably did. Pretty shitty title though,” Rick the Banned” I would have went with “Rick the Kingslayer” or something cool like that.

          • bujiebuke

            Ha ha! But seriously I don’t think he would have gotten banned if he hadn’t been so abrasive towards Kai. It really was not the time for him to go off in his usual rancor.

          • Kai

            Many would say he should’ve been banned earlier. At least one wanted to. What he doesn’t know is that I was the one who actually and literally argued to give him yet another chance, because of my familiarity with him as one of the oldest commenters on the site. He then spat in my face.

            I understand there’s always some morbid curiosity or satisfaction surrounding someone getting banned, but let’s try not to look like we’re dancing around celebrating. As much as I disagree with aspects of Rick’s personality and proclivities, he contributed plenty of decent to good comments over the years. He may have always been overly abrasive with others and indignantly nonchalant about it, but that was not the sum of who he is or what he was like on cS. This is simply a case of someone who violated the comment policy multiple times and despite multiple attempts to discourage him from doing so, he remained obstinant and contemptuous.

            And with that, I’ve managed to make this off-topic discussion relevant to the above story.

            If you have any other questions, email us. I’d like us to try keeping the comments section for discussion about the story rather than community post-mortem navel-gazing.

          • ClausRasmussen

            At some point you should start a public discussion of the moderation policy, writing an email works best for complaining about a concrete case

            My input would be that you’ve become too strict

          • Kai

            First, we’ve had public discussions of the moderation policy:

            http://www.chinasmack.com/2012/announcements/petition-for-a-less-racist-chinasmack-comments-section.html

            http://www.chinasmack.com/2013/announcements/changes-to-comment-policy-verification-of-email-addresses.html

            Second, to evaluate strictness would require knowledge of every act of moderation each of us who have moderating powers actually undertake. You’d have to see all of the comments that pass through, which ones are not approved, which ones are deleted, who is banned, and by whom.
            Absent this information, is it fair to judge strictness?

            I would argue that I’m the LEAST strict moderator. I delete far fewer comments than any other moderator and sometimes even undelete those that have been deleted because even if I disagree with the content, it didn’t seem to be a gross violation of our comment policy. This is not to disrespect the other moderators and their judgement on edge cases but to point out a relevant fact that has bearing on your judgement of me.

            I suspect the reason you think I’m too “strict” is because I happen to be consistently vocal in trying to reason with people both over disagreements as a fellow commenter in the community and over comment policy violations as a moderator. The irony is that I try to reason with people with the hope they’ll modify their behavior so we can avoid having to moderate.

            I may be vocal about admonishing violations, but I’m incredibly lenient when it comes to actually enforcing our comment policy. The overwhelming majority of bans I’ve given out involve sockpuppetry (people using multiple IDs, pretending to be multiple people to harass others or to support themselves). I have tried reasoning with people who have nothing but invective for me to the ends of the earth without banning them, too often against the advice of others.

            If you feel I’ve been too strict with the Rick case, feel free to email us to argue your case and I’ll be happy to discuss the factors leading to his ban with you. If you feel I’ve been too “strict” in general, please articulate how. I’m no stranger to complaints and criticisms about my actions or my person. I want to think I’ve articulated myself reasonably in most if not all situations but maybe I haven’t and that has contributed to your impression of me.

            That said, do consider that you don’t have all the information and do entertain the possibility that you’ve judged me unfairly as a result. We seem to have seen eye-to-eye on a great many topics in our time shared on cS so I respect you and thus value your perspective.

          • bujiebuke

            “I understand there’s always some morbid curiosity or satisfaction surrounding someone getting banned, but let’s try not to look like we’re dancing around celebrating. ”

            – You got it all wrong. I was laughing specifically at biggj’s suggestion for his new avatar name, nothing else. This may come as a shock to you and others, but I personally did not think he should have been banned – perhaps limit his post to 1 per month for half a year or something like that. In retrospect, it would have been more clear if I quoted biggj.

            I noticed Sun and biggj were discussing the new moderation policy, so that’s why I asked if it was possible to confirm if anyone got banned or not. I was initially surprised by “Rick the banned’s” message that he got removed and I didn’t believe him until now.

            I couldn’t find your email. Your About page, where I think your email is listed is blank.

          • Kai

            I apologize if I’ve exaggerated your reaction, but to clarify, I was referring to you asking if there was a way to check if he was banned, not your “ha ha” in response to BiggJ.

            The curiosity to know whether or not someone is banned is what I called “morbid curiosity”. I understand why people want to know, since it helps them get an idea for the lay of the land but I think you can guess why we think it isn’t a terribly good idea to make a big public deal about bans.

            While there’s an argument that it communicates to the community that there is indeed enforcement, I’ve always felt bans shouldn’t be publicly announced. Too often I’ve seen people dancing on graves, which is frankly poor form if not outright petty.

            More importantly, it distracts from what the comment section should really be about: discussion of the article above. A comment section with too much attention on who is banned and why borders on hostile, on a community “divided” trying to “keep score”.

            We want to avoid that.

            We don’t post our individual email addresses to prevent them from being harvested by spam bots. Please use our general Contact form on cS’s About page. It’ll get to me.

          • bujiebuke

            “The curiosity to know whether or not someone is banned is what I called “morbid curiosity”.”

            There’s no need to apologize here. I understand where your coming from but I think calling my inquiry morbid curiosity is inaccurate even in the loosest sense of that phrase. Let’s agree to disagree here.

            Do you guys have any plans to add an IM feature to your website? I think it would be a great way to keep off-topic discussions from stories.

          • Kai

            I’m not sure we really disagree. I think I just misinterpreted you (see my other comment). Since you understand where I was coming from, we’re all good.

            Nah, no IM feature. It woud cost money we don’t have to develop one and while third-party services exist for such, we’re not entirely sold on it being desirable.

            Similarly, people have suggested we implement an actual forum (where people can post their own topics instead of everyone chatting in an article’s comments section), but forums present a whole host of potential problems. They’re resource intensive (especially if you have a lot of users) which threatens to cost us money we don’t have and then we’d more firmly fall under user-generated content clauses requiring even more time and energy spent simply reviewing and moderating all the possible things people could post on a forum. We know some hardcore users of cS would love it, but the overall cost-to-benefit calculation doesn’t pan out.

          • bujiebuke

            LOL, I saw your other comment as soon as I finished typing the one you just replied to. We’re on the same page. Have a good one.

          • Kai

            You’re living up to his accusation that you have an obsession.

          • bujiebuke

            No, it speaks to my initial disbelief that he got banned. I noticed the “Rick the banned” name and thought his remark was more sarcasm than real. I am the one who called him out for some of his BS and it’s only natural for me to ask if he really did get banned. Moreover, it’s not unreasonable for anyone to be curious given how rare it is to see someone get banned here. I don’t want to get too repetitive here so I’ll point to my reply to you further below.

          • Kai

            There was a whole crowd of people who called him out on his behavior. You and I think Dr. Sun were the ones who went further and tried to paint a picture of his entire person and life, going beyond valid objection and into character assassination.

            I apologize again if I misinterpreted and thus mischaracterized the sentiment behind you asking if there was a way to check if someone was banned. I can definitely see how it was an expression of your skepticism about him representing himself as banned. I hope you can see how it might look like morbid curiosity from my perspective thus explaining my response to you.

            Yes, it isn’t unreasonable to be curious. I said so in my other reply. Hope we’re on the same page now. Cheers.

          • biggj

            I already have the new moderation rules beat. I’m posting this disclaimer before all my post.

            Disclaimer:This post is intended for the use of the individual addressee(s) named above and may contain information that is confidential privileged or unsuitable for overly sensitive persons with low self-esteem, no sense of humor or irrational religious beliefs. If you are not the intended recipient, any dissemination, distribution or copying of this post is not authorized (either explicitly or implicitly) and constitutes an irritating social fauxpas. No animals were harmed in the transmission of this post, although the mutt next door if he keeps barking is living on borrowed time.

          • ClausRasmussen

            What new moderation rules ?

          • Dr Sun

            its a secret, they’re not telling us

          • left nut

            LOL that meme is awesome!

          • Alex Dương

            More seriously, yes, we have a problem with what you call blind nationalism. In recent times, it was arguably most evident (i.e. most embarrassing) when we temporarily renamed french fries “freedom fries” because France dared, DARED to disagree with us on Iraq.

          • mr.wiener

            You know this is not the first time this BS has happened. During WW1 there was a movement in the US to rename saurkraut “liberty cabbage”…
            You couldn”t make this shit up.

          • Alex Dương

            At least we were fighting the Germans at the time. With the French, we acted like our friends have to agree with us 100% of the time.

          • biggj

            It’s that thug mentality, if you ain’t with us, you’re against us.

          • Alex Dương

            Damn Anakin Sky–I mean George W. Bush.

          • Amused

            Damn Canadians feeling all superior and whatnot!

          • ClausRasmussen

            Nationalism is the notion that your country is _your_ country. Not EUs, not UNs, not some human rights council or whatnot without any democratic representation that’s telling you how to run your country

          • Dax

            “…the true patriotism, the only rational patriotism, is loyalty to the Nation ALL the time, loyalty to the Government when it deserves it.” -Mark Twain

          • David

            Do Canadians ever talk anything BUT shit about the U.S.? LMAO Just teasing my Canadian friends.

          • Teacher in China

            Teasing aside, it’s true. We define ourselves waaaaay too much in relation to the U.S. I hate that. The whole “Americans do it this way, but Canadians do it this way – raaaaahhhhh CANADUH, we’re the BEST!” bs really aggravates me, especially because it’s often used by advertisers to whip people into a nationalistic spending spree. Every time someone posts something about U.S. vs Canada on facebook, I want to block them.

          • Free Man

            Usually if you complain about any european government to a local citizen of that country, they will agree with you and complain even louder about their government. I talked to a couple US citizens and they all share my opinion about how US citizen living and working still have to pay taxes to the USA. Nobody tried to defend their gouvernment. My indian friends don’t defend anyone when asked about recent cases of sexual assault in India, they call for death sentence.

            But when talking to my wife about chinese news, half of the time she defends her old home. When I see her smiling I know that she knows its bullshit. The other time she told me about the news and is complaining herself.

          • biggj

            Depends on how brainwashed someone is by nationalism.

          • Alex Dương

            In my experience here at chinaSMACK, I’ve encountered many people who get defensive about their country. Take this discussion as an example. It starts with takasar1 pointing out that the U.K. only granted democracy to Hong Kong as their rule was coming to an end. Time101 doesn’t know that takasar1 is from the U.K. and sees this as an attack on the U.K. He then proceeds to defend why it took so long for Hong Kong to receive democratic reforms. In the end, he realizes that takasar1’s comment wasn’t an attack, per se, and he withdraws his previous comment.

            I’d bet you if he had known from the start that takasar1 was one of his countryfellows, he wouldn’t have tried to defend London’s super late attempt to democratize HK.

          • Free Man

            OK, you think this, I think that, and nothing’s changed. Everyone is satisfied, happy end.

          • Alex Dương

            I can definitely agree to disagree on this.

          • Free Man

            Fair enough

          • ClausRasmussen

            >> Usually if you complain about any european government to a local citizen of that country, they will agree with you

            I wouldn’t. I’ve overheard several conversations where foreigners are complaining about my country and I was always thinking “fuck off if you don’t like it”

          • Byrnzie28

            Since when does complaining about your government constitute ‘complaining about your country’?

          • ClausRasmussen

            Complaining about the governments policies is usually the same as complaining about the country’s policy

            I addition, even if I agree that the country’s/governments policy is wrong, it is a matter between me as a citizen of the country and the government, foreigners have no say

          • RickyBeijing

            Foreigners have no say?! You’re on a website called Chinasmack, a website geared towards foreigners learning about China’s sucky side, and bashing it in the comments, however you believe that “foreigners have no say”? I think that a mite hypocritical

          • ClausRasmussen

            People are generally hypocritical if you haven’t noticed… but my point was to explain my emotional reaction to criticism of my country by foreigners, not to institute a rule about what you are allowed to talk about

            And btw, my mission here is not to bash China or Chinese culture but to try to understand what the f*ck is going on, often by contrasting Chinese phenomenons with similar Western phenomenons as we do here by comparing reactions to criticism from foreigners

          • Free Man

            I am a foreigner living abroad in country that I have no citizenship for. I never took anything, gave people work, paid them and paid my taxes. I try to stick to the rules and not offend the locals with my habits. And still there are idiots out there, saying just because of my passport I have no saying in whats happening in the country I am currently residing in? How ignorant can someone be?

          • ClausRasmussen

            >> because of my passport I have no saying in whats happening in the country I am currently residing in

            They’re obviously right, because of your passport you can’t vote. On the other hand you are free to leave and go back to your own country. No one force you to stay

          • donscarletti

            If you have unmitigated devotion to the country you are in you should be carrying its passport.

            With civic rights comes civic duty. Take it or leave it.

            Postscript: Also, with your avatar, you obviously don’t give a shit about what the CCP wants, why should they give a shit about what you want?

          • Free Man

            I will ask for the passport, it just takes 12 years and i haven’t lived here half the time necessary.

            Also it’s not that I want anyone to give a shit about me or what I say. I couldn’t care less about what anyone thinks of me, (least of all the CCP, as you noticed). But I think that freedom of speech isn’t limited to stuff happening in your country. So I have the freedom to say my opinion about [put any country in here].

          • Free Man

            So you are like these brainwashed nationalists. Good job.

          • ClausRasmussen

            Yes, I am a nationalist and I am proud of it

    • David

      True. When we go out if we get bad service from ‘whomever’ I have to always convince my Chinese friends that they do not need to be embarrassed/ashamed just because they are Chinese too.

  • Alex

    Why didnt’ the security guy interviene? Every plane has 1 or 2 privately contracted security agents. It affected the security of everyone, why didn’t he step up to confiscate the phone?

    • KamikaziPilot

      There’s a security agent flying on EVERY plane? Is this only in China or everywhere? I wasn’t aware of this.

      • Dr Sun

        neither was I

      • hess

        And theyre also PRIVATELY contracted ones lol.

      • Alex

        Yup, I know a guy who did that for a few years. But the hours were shit.

      • 山炮 ShanPao

        Yes, in China there are. Usually sitting at the front of the plane and acquainted with the air hostesses. I thought they were military, but maybe they are private contracts. You can usually tell as they look a bit different from your average chinese male… not big, but muscular.

        • KamikaziPilot

          You sure they’re on ALL or even most flights? Maybe a select few right? I will look for them the next time I fly there.

          • vincent_t

            I won’t feel easy if a guy called Kamikazi Pilot sit next to me on flight. Worse if he start telling me he is looking for the air marshal

          • Zappa Frank

            LOL…

          • KamikaziPilot

            Haha, okay I admit that’s pretty funny, but would you rather sit next to a guy named Muhammed, or Osama?

          • vincent_t

            Muslim is the majority from where i come from, so I am totally comfortable flying with lots of Muhammed on plane. Of coz, unless he is carrying an ISIS flag then I will choose you instead ;)

          • 山炮 ShanPao

            Well, I’m not certain of it. I fly once or twice a week at least and there always seem to be these guys sitting at the front of the plane. I just assumed and I doubt the ZF would ever publicly announce it. Have a look next time and tell me if I’m wrong.

    • ClausRasmussen

      Security guys (if even present on Chinese flights) are supposed to act in case of a threat against the airplane. Intervening in cases like this could be a ruse to expose them to the real terrorists

  • Markus Havemann

    I wonder why no system has been implemented and made compulsory for new phones to shut down and limit calls to emergency calls only upon receiving a certain “shut down signal”. I don’t think of a GSM-jammer but a proper solution which transmits a specified signal to all phones around this system to disable calls. In contrast to a jammer such a system could still allow to make emergency calls.
    Such system could be installed not only on planes but also in cinemas, theatres etc.

    • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

      Probably because that either may feel too limiting, or some may even think it can be exploited. Phones nowadays have an ‘airplane mode’ option. It should still be up to the passenger to show responsibility and turn it of themselves, or be complete assholes and use it at the wrong time.

      • Dr Sun

        mine does

      • hess

        A lot of airliners wont let you use your phone in airplane mode, sadly.. I flew Finnair, Norwegian, China Southern and China eastern last year and the only company that allowed phones in airplane mode were Finnair, which did allowed them to be on during take-off and landing as well. Finnair might have the oldest, ugliest, fattest, finnish-est and rudest flight attendants of Europe, but atleast youre allowed to listen to the music on your phone

        • biggj

          You are allowed to on Canadian airlines at all times now but they have to be in airplane mode. Even during takeoff and alll that you can use use them. Like you said it good for music and movies.

        • vincent_t

          you can use the phone too on Cathay, MAS, Luthansa just to name a few. I think it is rather stupid when they allowed me to use my laptop but asked me to turn off my phone even it is in flight mode.

    • Dr Sun

      so whenever a Govt wants to stop Citizen communication, it just sends out a “shut down signal” great idea …NOT

      • Free Man

        Just imagine some terrorist turning off government mobiles. No, this must never happen.

  • KamikaziPilot

    “These kind of people are usually those who like to zhuang bi. The moment they get on a plane, they have all sorts of calls, all sorts of chats, all just to show that they have someone meeting them at the airport, how busy they are, when in reality they fucking don’t even take a plane more than a few times the entire year but finally they have such a rare opportunity to zhuang bi so they have to seize it!”

    Love this comment. I think this person may be on to something.

    • Dr Sun

      I think your right

  • biggj

    “Airport police point out that according to regulations in the Law on Public Security Administration Punishments, using equipment interfere with the navigation systems used on an in-use aircraft”

    Bullshit.

  • vincent_t

    I doubt what the captain claimed is true. It doesn’t seem to be possible that using phone on the airplane could impact that much on the instrument, the practice of turning the phone off is just a precautions to avoid all risk. If a phone call could interfere his navigation system so much, I bet the airplane was bought from Taobao.

    • vonskippy

      Exactly, if cell phones could bring down a big jet, think how many would have already been crashed. Tens of thousands of flights per day, each with hundreds of cell phones, yet there’s not a single rash of mystery crashes. The terrorists would have a field day – stand back, I’m going to turn my cell phone on and crash us all. If there was ANY chance at all about that happening, cell phones would be banned from all flights. Geesh people are stupid – learn to use a bit of logic before swallowing the company line.

      • biggj

        Exactly, even if there was a 0.01% chance of messing with anything on the plane, they would not even be allowed on the plane at all.

    • ClausRasmussen

      There is no documented case of a cell phone bringing down a plane or even interfering with the electronics aboard. It is a “better be safe than sorry” policy and many airlines have already decided to lift the ban.

      Another thing is that when flight crew give you instructions, you’re supposed to follow them. 5 days in detention may be a little harsh, but I guess she managed to piss off several officials with her behaviour so maybe the punishment is one day for not turning off her cell phone and 4 days for being a douche

      • vincent_t

        Yeah i agree. But that is not the topic in my comment. What I was saying is that the captain was merely exaggerating when he claimed his instrument became unstable due to the phone call. Any standard airplane instrument would go through very strict EMC testing to make sure it survive certain degree of EM interference. And the news is stupid enough to quote his claim without validating it.

  • donscarletti

    On one hand, phones have never really had much of an effect on navigational equipment and today do not affect civil aviation communications equipment. So much so that other airlines are allowing passengers to make calls mid flight.On the other, I sure would hate to sit next to a passenger chatting on their phone loudly all trip.

    • 宋易

      yeah, my eyebrows were awfully raised when the pilot claimed his instrumentation was visibly off.

    • Kai

      Hah, true, but if it turns out that mobile phone use on planes has no real risk, then making calls on a plane should then be bound by the general courtesies involved in making a call in public among others or in close proximity to others. At a minimum, it would mean you could make and receive calls as normal but you’d conduct them in a way that is sensitive and considerate to those around you, which usually means not chatting loudly.

      Of course, while most people intuitively understand this and behave accordingly, a lot of people unfortunately don’t. While not uniquely guilty of this, a lot of older (and not just mainland) Chinese people tend to speak very loudly into their phones. They don’t intend to disturb others but it’s just some bad habit they have.

      Would we rather forbid use to avoid possible disturbances or would we rather have the freedom and just respond to disturbances as they happen?

  • Guang Xiang

    Fuckin’ flight attendant should have followed through with a huge fine.

    • 宋易

      Federal offense in the US! Serious shit…

  • UserID01

    Hmmm, turn off phone for free or face a fine and possible jail time…

    You’d think if those are your options, you’d just turn the stupid phone off.

  • Byrnzie28

    I can understand having to turn your phone off on a plane – something to do with signal traffic, etc, right? – but can somebody explain to me why they tell you to turn off your I-pod? An I-pod doesn’t emit any signals, etc, so why do they insist that you turn it off during take-off and landing? Is it so that if something severe occurs you’ll be able to hear the flight attendant telling you to put your life-jacket on, etc? Seems a bit extreme to me. I mean, if the plane begins losing altitude at a fast rate of knots, then you’ll know about it, whether you’ve got the Butthole Surfers playing in your ears or not.

    • 宋易

      ipods dont use cellular technology, but all electronic devices emit electromagnetic radition. the chances an ipod will interfere with airplane equipment is probably extremely low, but the consequences can be catastrophic. a lot of liability for someone to listen to iggy azalea during take off.

  • Byrnzie28

    You should have complained to the flight attendant about having been made to sit next to a racist.

    • 宋易

    • guest

      And after you complained you should of asked the flight attendant to serve you macadamia nuts on a plate instead of in a bag.

  • 宋易

    why are 60% of chinese obstinantly shy, non confrontational, and not really polite but not rude either, while the rest are such obnoxious bullying petulant brats? hope the governement figures out how to attach civil micro-fines to ID cards… make loads of money, and really fuck with the dickheads.

  • Chaz

    Remember the scene in “Airplane” where everyone lines up to beat/slap/baseball bat/kick that stupid cunt in the plane that was freaking out? This needed to be done to this selfish, self centered twat.

  • BrandeX

    once on a plane from dubai to hong kong, a lady from northern china said “thank god you’re not coloured”

    “You mean like you? No.”, I replied.

    Fixed for you.

    • Kai

      Has anyone else met any Chinese person, from Northern China or not, who uses the word “colored”? In English or Chinese?

      • KamikaziPilot

        Never, but they could have picked it up from some local wherever they were living.

        • Kai

          True, does anyone know any place in this world that still uses the word “colored” as a common convention? I thought that word fell out of conventional use in like the 60s or at least by the 70s. People in Dubai?

          • Irvin

            In theaters and movies, specifically period piece. “black” is the most common and politically correct term used now. It used to be “negro”.

          • Alex Dương

            AFAIK the super hardcore “social justice” types prefer “person of color.”

          • Irvin

            In the caribbean where most of the population is black, they actually laugh at you if you use the term “person of color”.

            I guess it’s different in different places, “of african decent” is another politically correct term that sounds less douche, but most of the time if they know you well enough they’ll call you “nigga” regardless of your race, for e.g. My surname is “Tang” so they call me “my nigga tang!” even though I’m asian.

            But in places like america, were racism against black is rampant, if the term “nigga” is ever used by anyone other than black, you’ll be crucify for it.

          • Silent Observer

            Irvin you like race baiting especially towards black folks…Whatever you don’t have the balls to say in a persons face don’t go spouting garbage online.

          • Kai

            Really? I always thought SJW’s would prickle at that term, since it inherently lumps everyone non-white together as the only distinction against “white”. I thought SJWs would prefer specificity of nationality/ethnicity over such broad dichotomous labels.

          • Alex Dương

            I know Tim Wise uses the term “person of color,” and it seems that it is a term that is consciously politically correct: “People of color is, however it is viewed, a political term, but it is also a term that allows for a more complex set of identity for the individual — a relational one that is in constant flux.”

          • Kai

            Interesting. I’m not sure if it is just me, but I wouldn’t immediately think of it as “politically correct”. As much as I like the color theory justification for its use, I still feel it inaccurately and unfairly dichotomizes people into “white” and “colored”. How different is it from a term like “laowai”?

          • Alex Dương

            Personally I think you bring up good points. I’m not familiar enough with their positions and arguments to venture a guess as to how they’d respond.

          • Zappa Frank

            there are, in mine people who want to be polite use the expression ‘colored man’..

          • Kai

            Interesting, what’s the Italian word/phrase they use?

          • Zappa Frank

            “uomo di colore”, but is used only by people that really want to emphasize their politeness (I think that obviously is an expression that come from US and that has been translated without realizing it was outdated).. another expression is ‘nero’ that literally means black.. but, can be used also the word ‘negro’ and in Italian is not considered a derogatory term because is an old way of say black, more close to the latin ‘negrus’… in some old books/poem we can still find ‘negro’ used also to describe the color of the night or land.

          • Kai

            Yeah, it might be an expression from the US. Sounds like “person of color”? You would know better than I about how that phrase was introduced to Italy.

            Americans currently hover between “black” and “African-American” in day-to-day usage. What do Italians normally say to refer to a “black” person? Is it the word you mentioned “nero”?

            What would be an Italian derogatory term for black people?

          • Zappa Frank

            yes is the same of person of color.
            in daily usage we say or African (since despite few cases like Balotelli, Italian balcks are almost none) or black (nero).
            Negro is not a derogatory term, but is slowly becoming following the English use. A real Italian derogatory term is “vu cumpra’ ” that is a mispronunciation of “vuoi comprare?” (do you want to buy it?), it mimics the pronunciation of the firsts Africans immigrants in Italy that were (and still are) used to sell goods of various kinds on the streets. (people from Senegal that have been called Moroccans for years due to a lack of geography knowledge of many Italians…)

          • Kai

            Pretty normal then, similar to 黑人 or 非洲人 in Chinese.

            Do Italians commonly use the Italian equivalent of “Asians” and typically have in mind East Asians and non-Indian subcontinent South East Asians?

          • Zappa Frank

            No, there is not really a usage of the word “Asian”, but I don’t exclude that will come out pretty soon. Even “eastern”is referred also to Eastern European or middle eastern people, also to Asians but not just to them. Usually asians are called according to their nationality, japanese, Chinese, Korean, and so on..

          • Kai

            Interesting, I think in at least English the term “Asian” is pretty widely used and typically in reference to East Asians and most SEA. I don’t think it’s just a North American thing but I could be wrong. I bring this up because I always thought it was interesting that so many people tend to lump “black people” as “Africans” and “yellow people” as “Asians” (entire continents!).

          • Alex Dương

            I’m under the impression that in the U.K., “Asian” refers to South Asians while “Oriental” refers to East and Southeast Asians. I don’t know why there’s a difference across the Atlantic on this.

          • Kai

            I wasn’t aware of this either. Can anyone confirm?

          • Toasty

            Indeed it’s true. In the UK when we say Asian it generally refers to Indian/Pakistani/Bangladeshi people. But most of the time we are more specific, It’s pretty rare you will here someone use the term “Asian” in this context.

            I guess its because historically we have had many more South Asians living in the UK, and east Asians have been relatively rare (but getting more and more). Unlike the USA you will still not find many second generation East Asians in Britain (not for a few more years anyway), but second and third generation South Asians are extremely common.

          • Kai

            Interesting! So I’m familiar with there being a spectrm of “Asians”:

            East Asians – Generally Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans.
            South East Asians – Filipinos, Vietnamese, Thai, Indonesian, Malaysian, etc.
            South Asians – Indians, Pakistanis, and Bangladeshis, etc.

            As I alluded before, where I’m from, “Asians” is used pretty conventionally and usually refers to East Asians and often collectively including South East Asians, but rarely South Asians.

            I don’t think “South Asian” is commonly used at all and people would jump straight to “Indian” since they are the most populous. In a way, people are either recognized as “Asian” or “Indian”.

            I can understand the historical reasons for why British and Americans might associate the term “Asians” differently. I’ll have to keep this in mind when using the word “Asian” because what comes to mind is apparently very different between at least Americans and British. Thanks!

          • Escalante

            In South Africa, it is an official racial classification and has no offensive tone to it.

          • Kai

            Interesting. Does South African have any other racial classifications? Is this for some sort of census or are we talking about colloquial use?

          • biggj

            In Canada they say ” people of color” which is pretty much saying colored.

          • Kai

            Oh wow, I never knew that. I know and have met a lot of Canadians and I’ve been in Canada myself multiple times but I guess I never noticed that being a convention. Guess that marks me as an ignorant American. I guess that’s where your wife picked it up then?

      • biggj

        My wife told me those exact words just today.

        • Kai

          What do you mean? She used the word “colored” or she asked the same question I did?

          • biggj

            No, she said “thank god you’re not coloured”. :)

          • Kai

            LoL, what the heck. I’m still curious where Chinese people picked up this usage. I know it has been used in history and in period pieces but who the heck goes around thinking it is common convention these days? Any idea where she picked it up?

          • Irvin

            from period piece, obviously. lol

          • Kai

            Heh, the thing is, I have a hard time imagining a lot of Chinese people watching American period pieces and adopting the lingo into colloquial use.

          • Irvin

            Alot of local girls like to watch american tv series as a way to learn english. One of my ex even bought and watch every episode of friends.

            Recently there’re some period piece series like MadMen, probably where they get their lingoes from.

      • Teacher in China

        Nope. They usually say “black” (in English or Chinese).

        • Irvin

          Because “colored” is just an obsolete politically correct word that just sound stupid. They’re black, there’s no two way around it. And it’s not like the rest of us is “uncolored”.

      • guest

        Nope they just grunt and say waiguoren..oops that is north east china.

        • Kai

          Heh, I think “laowai” is more colloquially used. Chinese people in my experience (and off the top of my head) tend to lump people as white, black, Arabs, Indians…with maybe some specificity for a few countries they are more familiar with and can readily discern. We like to make fun of their lack of specificity, sensitivity, and sophistication in this regard (or maybe I’m just American) but when I think about it, the granularity is pretty similar around the world with most people.

          • Suicidal Tendencies

            You’ll never beat the lowest “granularity” level. Once I was waiting in a hotel’s lobby, and a man with his son stares at me, then turns to his son:
            “You learn how to speak foreigner at school. Talk to him in foreigner!” (gei ta shuo wai yu). No comment…

          • Kai

            Heh, that’s terrible granularity, and to be fair, 外语 would be “foreign language” instead “foreigner”. It’s a lot more funny if he said “speak ‘foreigner'” but he only actually urged the kid to try speaking to you in the foreign language he believes his kid learned that you be your native tongue (probably English). The notion that all foreigners speak a single “foreign” language is stupid but not intentionally so. I think it’s almost cute that he urged his kid to use a skill learned to engage cross-culturally. It’d be better than the dad saying “get behind me, son, a foreigner is nearby!” lol

    • NeverMind

      I was on a flight from Dubai to Guangzhou and had a very very large black guy on my left seat and a terribly smelly Chinese guy on my right seat. Thank heavens that there were a few empty seats around us so I got up and sat on another seat. I cannot imagine being in my first seat for seven hours without committing suicide on that flight!
      I am a brown guy myself, and I observed that the black people who usually transit from Dubai to Guangzhou are traveling for business purposes. They happen to be rich, obese and are often rude or indifferent, so I also feel wary to sit next to them. Compared to them, the Chinese transit passengers are usually poor workers returning home from Africa and are shy and more polite.

      I have traveled from Dubai to Guangzhou and back more than 20 times as I live in Dubai.

  • moop

    what’s the new comment policy going to be?

    “thou shall not straw man”

    “thou shall not nonsequitur”

    “thou shall not beg the question”

    “thou shall not make ad hominems”

    “thou shall not commit false equivalence”

    “thou shall not leave red herrings”

    “though shall not covet thy commenter’s ass”

    • 宋易

      that last one just isn’t fair. there’s a lot of sweet ass on these threads.

      • KamikaziPilot

        Sweet ass? Name one sweet ass. Unless you’re female or gay, but even then. Ever since linette left us this place is a bunch of ugly dudes talking smack about China.

        • 宋易

          Oh, sorry, I meant “sweaty ass”.

          • KamikaziPilot

            Oh okay, you’re right then, there are a lot of sweaty asses on this forum.

        • Dr Sun

          ” linette left us ”

          when, why ??? I’m gutted , sad and confused.

          • KamikaziPilot

            I just noticed she hasn’t posted in a while, hopefully she’s okay. I assume she got tired of the china bashers here and found something else to occupy her time. Now CSmack is really a sausage fest. I can’t name one regular female poster.

          • Kai

            That’s a little ironic since she’s arguably been a “China basher” herself at times.

            You know, according to Google Analytics, we actually have a pretty decent male:female ratio when it comes to visitors to our site, something like 5x%:4x%. Now, there are a lot of factors involved in this (including the fact that such gender data is extrapolated with a ton of confounding factors), but it might not be too difficult to speculate why the comments section seems male-dominated.

          • KamikaziPilot

            Wait a minute, how would Google Analytics be able to tell who’s female and who’s male? And how accurate would that be? I can see maybe geographic location or unique visitors statistics, but gender? I think in general internet forums are male dominated, unless of course it’s a forum specifically meant for women.

          • Kai

            They probably have a knowledge base or help article explaining it that I’m too lazy to dig out but I’m pretty certain it is an extrapolation, hence why I say there are tons of confounding factors involved. It’s nonetheless an interesting metric, but not really one that should be taken at face value.

            Anecdotally, cS is male-dominated, but we actually do have a lot of female readers if not regular commenters. I don’t want to seem sexist and I think socialization has a big part in this, but men and women generally have different proclivities to what they want to comment on and whether or not they will. Shrug.

          • gregblandino

            If you use gmail for example, Google will scan the content of your emails for keywords that determine stuff like gender. They also do lot’s of statistical analysis on Google searches/ youtube searches. Google Analyitics can do alot more than just gender, for better or for worse.

          • gregblandino

            http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/apr/15/gmail-scans-all-emails-new-google-terms-clarify
            More info on Google from a sort of left of center perspective if you’re interested.

    • ClausRasmussen

      Is there a new comment policy? Its been referred to a few times in this thread but I can’t find any reference to it. Did I miss something?

      • Kai

        These guys are reacting to my comment here:

        http://www.chinasmack.com/2015/stories/shanghai-bund-2014-new-years-eve-crowd-trampling-incident.html#comment-1771192971

        and maybe this one too:

        http://www.chinasmack.com/2014/videos/baijiu-drinking-challenge-goes-viral-online-in-china.html#comment-1771153825

        There will be a change to the comments policy coming. It will be formally announced. I’m more or less giving existing commenters a heads up.

        The change really isn’t “big” because our comment policy already provides for it. It’s just that the prevalence of utter contempt for this aspect of our comment policy is forcing us to reiterate and be stricter about it when it comes to actual moderation. I suppose if we do moderate more strictly, that will definitely seem like a “big” change to some people, especially those guilty of it.

        If you’re familiar with our existing comment policy (and everyone commenting really should be), find it reasonable, and have taken it to heart, you’re going to be fine and likely support the minor change and greater enforcement.

        What sort of change would you be worried about?

        • Guest

          this

        • Dr Sun

          this

          • Kai

            Yup, Big Brother is watching you. Welcome to the concept of comment policies and moderation on a website!

            …where we ban people for intentionally trolling others–especially complete strangers new to the website–and then boast about it creating a hostile environment for new would-be commenters.

            Someone come throw a hammer. Save us all.

          • Guang Xiang

            Honestly, I’ve seen far more strict comment policies in popular sites like SC2 teamliquid or even reddit. Their site, their rules.

  • Kai

    More accurately, we need to learn how to distinguish between fair criticism and unfair criticism and respond appropriately. Not all criticism is the same, just as not all reactions are the same. People should be open to fair criticism and not jump to being defensive. Both sides have a responsibility towards each other and themselves for conveying the extent and limitations of their views.

  • 宋易

    So, would that make a pilot freak out, “Oh, fuck, there’s a plane right on top of us! Shit, like, 12 of them!!!!”

  • ClausRasmussen

    >> we should accept criticism

    The problem is that foreign criticism is often seen as free riding. I cringe every time I hear Europeans criticize US for not taking military action somewhere on the globe, most recently Syria, because I am keenly aware that it will not cost European blood or tax payer dollars. Similarly when the US do take action to protect what is really European or Chinese interests (Gulf oil) and the Europeans whine about US militarism

    Another thing is that many domestic policies are aimed at benefitting the society as a whole and not just a narrow group of foreigners that always have the option to leave when the going gets tough.

    For example, in Denmark we have laws that mandate education in Danish if you want to live and work here. I overheard some foreign colleges complaining about this law, but they don’t have to feed thousands of low skilled “refugees” draining our welfare system because they’re virtually unemployable without Danish skills. That was one of my “f*ck off if you don’t like it” moments (it didn’t help that both of them were from a PIIGS country which acted like gasoline on my anger)

    • jaded

      As a rule, I don’t talk politics or religion in face to face conversation.So many think they’re political analysts/ diplomats after watching a news feed and it really irks me.

      Nothing pisses me off more than someone who I’ve just met discussing the political situation in my country and asking probing questions. Wonder what is wrong with these people, they have no concept of small talk, and just repeat what they’ve seen in the media and are unaware as to why you shouldn’t do that!

      • Kai

        Hah, I think for some or even a lot of people, politics or religion is small talk, especially if they themselves aren’t particularly sensitive to discussing those topics. They very humanly figure if they aren’t prickly about it, others probably won’t be either. At least the non-hypocritical ones are like that. They’re often genuinely surprised (and even apologetic) when they realize they’ve made someone uncomfortable because in their mind, they didn’t intend to.

        Generally, I think people just need to be more conscientious of how they broach certain topics and how they communicate their inquiries or opinions. Most people are pretty open to talking about contentious and even personally sensitive issues if you approach it in a respectful, earnest, and considerate manner. It’s also infinitely easier to “read” people face-to-face than for example over the internet.

        • jaded

          I agree with the gist of what you say Kai. However, I still contend that religion and politics are 2 conversation no no’s for people you have just been acquainted with. If you’re out there and you’re reading this please consider it before the next time you open your trap. It might be a conversation with someone you know a little better, or of course platforms such as this, where we’re under the cover of anonymity.

          • Kai

            To be clear, I agree with the general rule (or advice) to avoid politics and religion with strangers. I was just musing on the topic.

          • jaded

            Got it! Cheers Kai!

  • captainhawkeye

    Hi, I’m a pilot with a major carrier, the actual reasons to turn off devices are pretty much same as being asked to put shutters/blinds up while landing or taking off, you’ll notice we dim the lights or turn off all together depending on aircraft type. Its all so cabin crew have your full attention in case of emergency, your eyes are attuned to darkness if evacuation is needed and emergency crews can see which rows are still occupied. Yes, devices should be turned off ESPECIALLY IN CHINA because there are so many substandard or copied units around that emit all kinds of interference due to cheap or downright dangerous components. Btw, cabin crew aren’t especially there to serve you peanuts, their primary function is your safety.

    • Dr Sun

      “devices should be turned off ESPECIALLY IN CHINA because there are so many substandard or copied units around”

      are you talking about the planes or the phones ?

      • biggj

        That’s bullshit, not what you said but the other guy.

        http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mythbusters/mythbusters-database/cell-phones-interfere-plane-instruments/

        So why all the fuss about phones? When you make a call at 10,000 feet, the signal bounces off multiple available cell towers, rather than one at a time. That means too many phone-happy jetsetters might clog up the networks on the ground, which is why the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) — not the Federal Aviation Association (FAA) — banned cell use on planes.

      • vincent_t

        I am sure that guy is referring to the phone. And he has a point here. In China there is a lot of these 山寨机 (counterfeit hand phone) which use cheap electronics components and never submit for EMC testing and certification. These phones itself emits relatively stronger EM radiation than the typical phone and thus post a higher risk of interfering with the airplane system.
        Anyway, although the device fails to comply with EMC standard, it is still unlikely could interfere the airplane system so much so that cause any instrument failure nor interruption. Thus, the “phone off” thing is a precautions. Just remember, the phone is running on a battery, the battery will be dried up in milisecond to emit enough pulse energy to really cause any significant interference

  • Surfeit

    Landed in Shanghai just yesterday. ‘Please don’t switch on your devices until we come to a complete stop.’ And bam! a swarm of Chinese voices start chatter down their phone. Couldn’t wait for just another 10 minutes.

    • Guang Xiang

      meh, I’m more annoyed at the amount of premature standers.

      • Surfeit

        The entire experience is pretty unpleasant.

  • jaded

    No country is perfect but some countries are much more imperfect than others…

  • Marcus

    Each time I take the place in China you have people opening their mobile phones before wheels touch the ground (Wechat news from their friends seem to be sooooo important) and you usually have passengers that stand-up as well very quickly “I need to get my luggage first”

  • crimsonarmor

    Women are so chatty lol, couldn’t wait to land and make calls and decided to jepordize everyones safety. Don’t they have some kind of security or undercover officers on the plane in case of rowdy passengers? if i was on the plane i’d have confiscated the phone and warned the woman that she is jepordizing the saftey of my child. if you want it back you can get it when we have landed and the plane has come to a halt. Or you can test my mma skills :)

  • Anthony Heaney

    typical rich Chinese kids spolit brat who has never been spanked and never chastised.

  • vincent_t

    Kai can you just help me to delete above comment? I thought i deleted it but it changed to a Guest post. Weird

  • Kai

    Done. Yeah, the delete feature for Disqus confuses a lot of people. You have look at their FAQs to realize it actually just anonymizes and doesn’t actually delete. That may seem weird for users but it makes sense for websites because it isn’t desirable for people to retroactively delete comments that may already have replies to them and thus suddenly deprive historical conversations of the necessary context to understand them.

    So if you make a mistake in a comment, it’s best to use the Edit feature to fix it instead of reposting. While publicly asking for a mod to delete it works too, it’s probably less clutter if you email us directly with a link to the comment you want deleted. You can get the link by right clicking the timestamp next to your name on the comment or clicking the “link” icon in the “Share” menu that opens up (the link will be copied, so you only need to then paste it).

  • vincent_t

    Thanks and noted Kai.

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