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2010 South Africa World Cup, “Made In China”

Chinese worker making Vuvuzela horns in Zhejiang province, China.

Chinese worker making Vuvuzela horns in Zhejiang province, China.

From NetEase:

South Africa World Cup, “Made In China”

The World Cup uses balls made in a Jiujiang City [in Jiangxi province] “sweatshop”? The World Cup mascot is from Yiwu City [in Zhejiang province]? 60 million World Cup condoms were Chinese produced? Yes, China uses this way to “participate” in the South Africa World Cup…

2010 World Cup in Suth Africa footballs (soccer balls).

The “Jabulani” South Africa World Cup ball is manufactured like this

It’s Chinese name is “普天同庆” [“Jabulani”], and it is the official ball of the South Africa World Cup. The above everyone is familiar with, but what everyone is not familiar with is: It is made by Chinese workers with 2000 RMB monthly wages — Jiangxi Jiujiang Si Mao Bo Company was authorized in May 2009 as the main production base for the 2010 South Africa World Cup football, and began manufacturing the South Africa World Cup official ball. Up until May this year, this factory’s over 7000 workers have already completed 12 million competition and commercial official balls.

Adidas Jabulani balls, the official ball of the FIFA World Cup 2010 in South Africa, are gathered for practice of the US Soccer Team during a training session at Pilditch Stadium June 3, 2010 in preparation for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY

The controversial South Africa World Cup ball: Jubulani, made in China

A jabulani ball is pictured during the 2010 World Cup round of 16 match Netherlands vs Slovakia on June 28, 2010 at Moses Mabhida stadium in Durban. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR

Chinese worker making Vuvuzela horns in Zhejiang province, China.

The South Africa World Cup special little horn “Vuvuzela”: Made in China

June 22, Wang Kechun from Yunnan is in a Zhejiang province Ninghai county toy factory quickly making “Vuvuzela” horns. He can may one American penny from each Vuvuzela he makes.

Chinese workers making Vuvuzela horns in China.

June 22, workers at a plastic toy factory in Zhejiang province Ninghai county are quickly manufacturing “vuvuzela” horns. These worker’s monthly wages are around 2000 yuan.

Young Chinese worker producing vuvuzela horns in China.

June 23, a worker in the Zhejiang province Ninghai county Jiying Plastic Manufacturing Plant is manufacturing “vuvuzela” horns. The start of the South Africa World Cup has popularized the long and slender “vuvuzela” horn around the world, with around 90% of them coming from the Yiwu small commodities market. The “little horn” made in China has produced a distinctive sound at the South Africa World Cup.

Vuvuzela horns.

South Africa, a vuvuzela horn import company is packaging the little horns from China.

A Chinese blows a vuvuzela horn.

June 23, at the Yiwu City small commodities market, a dealer is blowing a “vuvuzela” horn.”

Chinese children blowing the vuvuzela horn.

June 23, two children at a family workshop in Zhejiang province Ninghai country blowing “vuvuzela” horns. Their mother is in the back making “vuvuzela” horns.

Chinese man's face from within a vuvuzela horn.

June 22, appearing through a vuvuzela horn’s opening, Zhejiang province Ninghai county vuvuzela manufacturing company boss Wu Yijun says one long 60 centimeter vuvuzela horn costs about 2 RMB to produce, but the retail price in South Africa can be as high as 54 RMB.

Vuvuzela horns manufactured in China.

June 23, a Zhejiang province Ninghai county factory is manufacturing “vuvuzela” horns, to be sold around the world through the Yiwu small commodities market.

CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 14:  An Italy fan blows a vuvuzela prior to the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa Group F match between Italy and Paraguay at Green Point Stadium on June 14, 2010 in Cape Town, South Africa.  (Photo by Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images)

South Africa World Cup fans’ distinctive vuvzela horns, a large portion of them coming from China.

A Chinese woman making vuvuzela horns.

June 22, a female worker is making vuvuzela horns in the production department. In front of the plastic injection molding machine, she must produce thousands of semi-finished vuvuzela horns.

Chinese girl holding different colored vuvuzela horns.

June 23, Yiwu Small Commodities Market dealer Wang Chuangxin is showing off various “vuvuzela” horns.

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16:  A Soweto youth takes packets of free condoms at a street soccer match to promote HIV/AIDS awareness held by the non-profit Population Services International (PSI), ahead of a World Cup game on June 16, 2010 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world, where almost one-third of women between the ages of 25-29 are HIV positive.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

The official condom of the South Africa World Cup: Made in China

Beginning from February, the South Africa Health Department began ordering “Choice Condoms” from a Guangxi Guilin latex factory to be an official World Cup product. Presently, this factory has provided 60 million condoms for South Africa.

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16:  HIV/AIDS awareness volunteer Bulie Mkhonza demonstrates proper condom use to local residents during a soccer match held by the non-profit Population Services International (PSI), ahead of a World Cup game on June 16, 2010 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world, where almost one-third of women between the ages of 25-29 are HIV positive.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

June 16, distributing Chinese-made “Choice” brand condoms on the streets of South Africa.

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16:  HIV/AIDS awareness volunteers from Population Services International (PSI), hand out condoms at a street soccer match ahead of a World Cup game on June 16, 2010 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world, and almost one-third of women between the ages of 25-29 are HIV positive. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16:  HIV/AIDS awareness volunteer Bulie Mkhonza distributes condoms to local residents during a soccer match held by the non-profit Population Services International (PSI), ahead of a World Cup game on June 16, 2010 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world, where almost one-third of women between the ages of 25-29 are HIV positive.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16:  HIV/AIDS awareness worker Tshegrfatso Dolo distributes condoms to fans during a soccer World Cup match at a fan park on June 16, 2010 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world, where almost one-third of women between the ages of 25-29 are HIV positive.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16:  A Soweto youth holds a free condom he received at a  HIV/AIDS awareness event held by the non-profit Population Services International (PSI), ahead of a World Cup game on June 16, 2010 in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV in the world, where almost one-third of women between the ages of 25-29 are HIV positive.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

A fan holds Zakumi the 2010 FIFA World Cup mascot doll during the Bafana Bafana versus  Namibia the 2010 FIFA International friendly match at Durban's new 70,000-seater Moses Mabhida stadium on 3 March 2010.Durban's Moses Mabhiba stadium is one of six venues built for next year's finals and will host a total of seven matches at the 2010 tournament, including one of the semifinals.The stadium's outstanding feature is a cable car which ascends to a viewing platform at the top of a 350m arch, which spans across one side to the other of the stadium and will form one of the major attraction to foreign tourists.AFP PHOTO RAJESH JANTILAL

South Africa World Cup mascot Zakumi: Made in China

World Cup mascot “Zakumi” is also manufactured in China. Reports say that there are tens of factories in Guangdong, Jiangsu, and other places responsible for producing Zakumi.

Slovakia's defender Jan Durica (L) buys Zakumi mascots during the Slovakia's team shopping trip in Pretoria on June 17, 2010 during the 2010 World Cup football tournament in South Africa.   AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR

June 17, Slovenia team member Durica buying a Zakumi at a store in Pretoria, South Africa

World Cup mascot “Zakumi” is also manufactured in China. Reports say that there are tens of factories in Guangdong, Jiangsu, and other places responsible for producing Zakumi.

2010 South Africa World Cup

Chinese companies appear in World Cup stadium advertising

“The ‘Ying Li’ on the advertising boards, what do they do?” Accustomed to seeing Pepsi, Adidas, and Nike’s advertisements, Ying Li appearance aroused much curiosity, not just from foreign football fans but even Chinese football fans can’t resist “Baidu-ing” it, to find out what it is. As one of the sponsors for this World Cup, the new energy company Ying Li from Baoding, Hebei province is indeed a “stranger” in the eyes of football fans, but just from the first few days of the World Cup, they have become famous, becoming one of the most searched keywords on Baidu and Google during these few days. Even though there have been experts who have pointed out that the main audience for the World Cup is the general audience and the sponsors have always revolved around McDonald’s, Budweiser, Sony, these kinds of consumer brands, for a brand like Ying Li, whether or not [this advertisement] can bring it sales is still unknown. However, this Jiucheng service has undoubtedly already has a reputation and can be said to have demonstrated the advertising effects of the World Cup.

BLOEMFONTEIN, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 27:  Thomas Mueller of Germany celebrates scoring his teams fourth past goal David James of England during the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa Round of Sixteen match between Germany and England at Free State Stadium on June 27, 2010 in Bloemfontein, South Africa.  (Photo by Joern Pollex/Getty Images)

Chinese made World Cup products.

The world’s largest small commodities market exports World Cup merchandise

June 23, a customer is examining a football star product within the Zhejiang province Yiwu small commodities market. According to Yiwu customs statistics, as a result of the World Cup, the monthly exports for local sports equipment have exceeded 10 million USD consecutively over the past half year, with the exports during the 5 previous months this year having increase 110% over the same period last year.

World Cup merchandise.

June 23, a dealer in the Zhejiang province Yiwu Small Commodities Market is doing business.

Different kinds of footballs (soccer balls) for sale at Yiwu, China.

June 23, a customer at the Zhejiang province Yiwu Small Commodities Market is selecting and purchasing footballs.

Shoppers walk past a display of replica jerseys from some of the countries participating at the World Cup in South Africa at a clothing market in Beijing on June 18, 2010. Though China failed to qualify for the tournament currently underway, the country recorded the single largest television audience for a World Cup match in the first two days of the tournament, world football governing body FIFA said on June 14. Millions of football loving fans in China are staying up late into the night to watch matches which end at the break of the following day. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN

June 23, a customer at the Zhejiang province Yiwu Small Commodities Market is selecting and purchasing football jerseys.

KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - 23 NOVEMBER: A girl prepares a give away set composed of a muffler and a hat of the German nationalteam in front of the Women's international friendly match between Germany and Japan at the Wildpark stadium on November 23, 2006 in Karlsruhe, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Niedermueller/Bongarts/Getty Images)

South Africa World Cup themed scarves: Made in China

In the midst of football fans, what China produces are necessities. The colorful wigs found on the heads of spectators were exported by a Zhejiang province Yiwu city company called Tian Cheng Handicraft, while the scarves printed with various cheerleading slogans were produced by Zhejiang province Hangzhou city Mo Shang Hua Limited, them having exported 600,000 scarves. With each scarf priced at 10-20 yuan, they have already pocketed 6 to 7 million RMB income.

KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - 23 NOVEMBER: A girl prepares a give away set composed of a muffler and a hat of the German nationa lteam in front of the Women's international friendly match between Germany and Japan at the Wildpark stadium on November 23, 2006 in Karlsruhe, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Niedermueller/Bongarts/Getty Images)

KARLSRUHE, GERMANY - 23 NOVEMBER: A woman hands out a give away set composed of a muffler and a hat of the German national team in front of the Women's international friendly match between Germany and Japan at the Wildpark stadium on November 23, 2006 in Karlsruhe, Germany. (Photo by Thomas Niedermueller/Bongarts/Getty Images)

A Chinese man wearing a rainbow wig in a wig store.

South Africa World Cup football fan wig, Yiwu-made

June 23, a football fan in the Zhejiang province Yiwu Small Commodities Market is trying on a football fan wig.

DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 16: Switzerland fans enjoy the atmosphere prior to the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa Group H match between Spain and Switzerland at Durban Stadium on June 16, 2010 in Durban, South Africa.  (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)

South Africa World Cup’s various football fan wigs

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 12:  Argentina fans kiss as they show their colours ahead of the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa Group B match between Argentina and Nigeria at Ellis Park Stadium on June 12, 2010 in Johannesburg, South Africa.  (Photo by Christof Koepsel/Getty Images)

A Dutch supporter wearing a wig and glasses cheers prior to the 2010 World Cup round of 16 match Netherlands vs Slovakia on June 28, 2010 in Durban. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR

A South African street vendor wearing a colourful wig blows a vuvuzela horn along a street in Pretoria on June 16, 2010 just hours before the 2010 World Cup football match between South Africa and Uruguay.    AFP PHOTO / Monirul Bhuiyan

Stadium volunteers walk around the inside of the Royal Bafokeng Stadium on June 2, 2010 in Rustenburg. England will play their opening match at the stadium against USA on June 12 during 2010 football World Cup in South Africa.  AFP PHOTO/ PAUL ELLIS

Chinese company provided 50,000 seats for South Africa World Cup’s 10 stadiums

One company in Zhejiang province provided 50,000 seats for the World Cup. According to a company insider, this order was personally ordered by the South African Nelson Mandela Bay mayor while leading a delegation visiting Ningbo.

View taken on April 7, 2010 shows the Moses Mabhida stadium in Durban where workers began to work on pitch preparations ahead of the 2010 FIFA World Cup football tournament. Games were suspended at the stadium to replace existing pitch grass. The 2010 FIFA World Cup runs from June 11 to July 11, 2010. AFP PHOTO RAJESH JANTILAL

This picture taken on March 21, 2010  shows the newly finished turf on the pitch at the Mbombela stadium in Nelspruit.  The stadium is one of the 10 venues where matches on the World Cup 2010 will be held from June 11- July 11, 2010.   AFP PHOTO / STR

This picture taken on February 26, 2010 shows the field of the Ellis Park stadium in Johannesburg. Ellis Park stadium is one of the10 stadiums in South Africa that will host The FIFA 2010 World Cup from June 11 to July 11. AFP PHOTO STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

This picture taken on February 27, 2010 shows the field of the Peter Mokaba stadium in Polokwane. Peter Mokaba stadium is one of the10 stadiums in South Africa that will host The FIFA 2010 World Cup from June 11 to July 11. AFP PHOTO STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

This picture taken on February 26, 2010 shows stands of the Soccer City stadium in Soweto. Soccer City stadium is one of the 10 stadiums in South Africa that will host The FIFA 2010 World Cup from June 11 to July 11. AFP PHOTO STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

This picture taken on February 9, 2010 shows the inside of the Nelson Mandela Bay stadium in Port Elizabeth. Nelson Mandela stadium is one of the 10 stadiums in South Africa that will host The FIFA 2010 World Cup in from June 11 to July 11. AFP PHOTO STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

This picture taken on March 1, 2010 shows the field of Green Point stadium in Cape Town. Green Point stadium is one of the 10 stadiums in South Africa that will host The FIFA 2010 World Cup and has a seating capacity of 70,000. AFP PHOTO STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

FIFA World Football Cup 2010 Free State Stadium is pictured on November 17, 2009 in Bloemfontein. South Africa on November 22 starts counting down the last 200 days until the FIFA World Cup, with workers putting the final touches on stadiums as the nation cleans up for the Final Draw next month.     AFP PHOTO/ STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN

A general view of the Loftus Versfeld Stadium in Pretoria/ Tshwanea taken on November 20, 2008. The roof has been put onto the stadium. Loftus Versfeld  is one of the stadiums that has  been selected=

Chinese football youths appear on the South African pitch

June 27, before the South Africa World Cup Round of 16 Argentina versus Mexico match, several Chinese children appeared on the pitch.

Chinese kids appear on the pitch before the 2010 South Africa World Cup match between Argentina and Mexico.

The air conditioners at South Africa World Cup’s main stadium are central air conditioning units from China’s Gree

Home appliance and IT companies have also entered the South African stadiums. A Gree Electric official said: “Winning the South Africa World Cup facilities central air conditioning supplier and management order, our sales increased 200 million RMB.”

Comments from NetEase:

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网易火星网友:

In terms of economics, China has already entered industrialization, and at the same time informationalization, but the level [of the country/society] is very low. China’s industrialization is a cheap labor and outsourcing [export manufacturing] economy, and this is a low level of industrialization. The recent “Foxconn Incidents” is a very good example. A worker working normally for a month can only get a few hundred kuai, not even enough to live on, the trade unions unable to protect workers’ interests. Go look at England’s industrial history, companies like Foxconn are about the same as the sweatshops during England’s most backward period.

网易辽宁阜新网友:

As the world’s number one cheap labor market, should we sigh that the country has become rich and powerful or that the ordinary common people are cheap? Is this worth showing off? Our labor costs are even lower than India. All of the world’s processing businesses are based in China. This is how we grow GDP, not through expanding domestic demand. Colluding with foreigners to exploit the ordinary common people instead of investing in the people, is GDP that important? What about the ordinary common people’s happiness? It hasn’t increased along with the GDP.

网易广东深圳网友:

China is very competitive in light industry products and in many fields. China’s massive manufacturing exports is the collapse of factories in many countries…the unemployment of many foreign countries’ people! It isn’t that other countries do not want to do this business, but that they cannot outcompete China! I will also fire rockets for other countries…our electronics are exported to many countries, go abroad and see, Chinese products are everywhere…
We should feel proud…sports is just a kind of exercise…it is not that important…the economy is what is important…we need to be self-confident…our televisions…refrigerators…computers…machinery…a lot a lot of things are being exported…where do you think all of our foreign exchange reserves came from…???? Chinese people are always so self-abased…

网易广东广州越 秀网友:

When we build planes and robots, then we can take it out and show off. What is there to show off with this? Show off China’s cheap labor?

网易浙江湖州网友:

China uses this way to “participate” in the South Africa World Cup…
You guys can only use this kind of writing to comfort yourselves. Being Chinese is too fucking disgusting.

网易广东东莞网友:

How many things were polluted to make these things, the income is not proportionate to the consumption. The true “world factory” is not worth showing off, instead, we should deeply reflect and feel sad.

网易福建南平网 友:

The American dollars earned through toiling invested in American bonds have again been made worthless by Americans. The Americans spend while the Chinese people pick up the bill…it sucks being the Chinese people …

网易河北石家庄 网友:

Why is [our] labor cheap? Because China’s population is too large. No matter what, the more there is, the less valuable it is.

网易中国手机网友:

What is the motherland?
The motherland is something you can criticize ten times tomorrow but do not allow other countries to criticize.
If you cannot change this country, then you change yourself.
Hope the editors do not delete this first post/comment of mine.

网易江苏南京网友:

Not a major manufacturing country, but the most low-end contract manufacturing country, a shanzhai country.

网易辽宁沈阳网友:

Everyone look at the prices of things abroad. In China, apart from labor, everything is more expensive than abroad, it isn’t even necessary to mention cars and houses.

网易北京网友:

Can you generation of mental retards be clear headed a bit? You think solving the problem of feeding, clothing, and providing employment for 1.3 billion is easy? Do you see any other country that is able to take on the problem of feeding such a large labor force? Eat and live on or starve to death, which would you choose?

网易河北唐山网友:

I only feel very ashamed. Many things we can make, but most of the money is earned by other countries. I really don’t know what to say.

Balls and horns. chinaSMACK personals.

Written by Fauna

Fauna is a mysterious young Shanghainese girl who lives in the only place a Shanghainese person would ever want to live: Shanghai. In mid-2008, she started chinaSMACK to combine her hobby of browsing Chinese internet forums with her goal of improving her English. Through her tireless translation of popular Chinese internet news and phenomenon, her English has apparently gotten dramatically better. At least, reading and writing-wise. Unfortunately, she's still not confident enough to have written this bio, about herself, by herself.