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Bus Driver Struck by Road Debris Saves His Passengers First

A large piece of metal flies toward a Chinese bus, smashing through the windshield and slamming into a bus driver who heroically stops the bus and evacuates his passengers before succumbing to his injuries.

A bus driver struck by a flying piece of metal while driving sacrifices his life to stop the bus and evacuate passengers, earning him accolades around the country

The below video is one of the most popular videos this week on YouKu, receiving over 1.1 million views and 11,000 comments since being uploaded yesterday.

From YouKu:

World’s Toughest Driver Saves Busload of People

Warning, some viewers might find the content in the video below disturbing.

May 29th, a Zhejiang Changyun Express Company bus returning from Wuxi to Hangzhou was suddenly struck by a large flying chunk of metal. The piece of iron burst through the windshield, striking the driver Wu Bin, but he did not allow the bus to veer out of control and instead using astonishing perseverance and willpower to safely stop the bus and unload the passengers while he sacrificed his own precious life due to his liver having burst in numerous places.

A bus driver struck by a flying piece of metal while driving sacrifices his life to stop the bus and evacuate passengers, earning him accolades around the country

From GuanCha:

Hangzhou’s “Best Driver” Painfully Stops Bus to Save Passengers – Full Course of Events

At noon on May 29, Hangzhou Changyun Express Company driver Wu Bin was driving a bus to Hangzhou from Wuxi via the Jiangsu-Yixing expressway when suddenly a large piece of metal smashed through the front windshield into Wu Bin’s abdomen, causing laceration of the liver, ribs, and arm, multiple fractures, as well as bruising of the lungs and intestines. At this critical moment, Wu Bin endured immense pain to safely stop the vehicle, apply the hand brake, turn on the hazard lights, ensure the bus was safely parked, inform his passengers to pay attention to safety, open the door, and safely evacuate all 24 passengers. Finally, due to his serious injuries, Wu Bin sat paralyzed in his seat. Two days later, in the early morning of June 1st, Wu Bin passed away at the age of 48 years old.

Comments from YouKu:

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yuanvacy:

This truly is a sudden and unexpected disaster… [literally a disaster that flies in].

幸福的幸福幸福:

It fell from an airplane.

华夏。。。:

How come those passengers didn’t have any reaction?

毛あ驴:

Rest in peace! Really worth of praise.

wutaiping:

Fucking piece of metal.

snailsleep:

It seems like the cargo truck on the opposite side somehow sent a piece of iron laying on the road flying.

caosizhongjie:

Fuck, even though a ruptured liver is indeed a hopeless situation [doomed to die], with so many passengers on the bus, not a single one went forward to try helping him [medically]? Even to simply ask if he’s okay would’ve been something. All only fucking knowing to flee for their own lives! Sigh!

晴天MM猫:

Fuck whoever threw that piece of iron! This must be investigated, otherwise in the future everyone will just randomly throw things onto the highway! That driver is really a hero! Feeling sorry [for this driver]…

支持老奶奶:

That piece of iron was probably traveling 240km/h when it smashed into Wu Bin, striking his internal organs. MBD, the short-skirted girl behind him, doesn’t even care to help him and just stumbles towards the back [of the bus].

想点根烟 (responding to above):

Actually if you think about it from her perspective, at that time she was probably scared stupid, a huge piece of iron just smashed into a person, she’s not a trained professional, what can she do? It’s not like giving mouth-to-mouth CPR to a drowned person, just calling for help I think is not bad. However, giving the driver some comfort and support at that time would’ve been even better.

What do you think? Should the passengers have done more to help the driver?

Written by Joel

Joel is a reclusive writer based in Shanghai who took up blogging as a hobby one summer and never looked back. Former editor of Shanghaiist.

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