Chinese Pay Tribute to Mao Zedong on his 121st Anniversary

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From NetEase:

People Bow to Mao Zedong’s Statue to Commemorate the 121st Anniversary of his Birth.

December 25th is the 121st anniversary of the birth of Comrade Mao Zedong, people gather at Mao Zedong Square in Hunan Shaoshan [Mao’s birthplace] to offer flower bouquets in front of Comrade Mao Zedong’s bronze statue.

On December 25th in Hunan Shaoshan. People from all walks of life came to pay tribute in front of Chairman Mao’s bronze statue.

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On December 25th in Hunan Shaoshan. A religious figure is tidying up the flower bouquets in front of Mao Zedong’s bronze statue.

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On December 25th in Hunan Shaoshan. 70 elderly party members from Beijing booked a bus just to come to Shaoshan to pay tribute to Chairman Mao. [Long live the Communist Party is written on the flag]

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On December 25th in Hunan Shaoshan. Tourists took photos in front of Comrade Mao Zedong’s former home.

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On December 25th, people gather at Mao Zedong Square to sing red songs and recite Mao Zedong’s poems.

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On December 25th, people gather at Mao Zedong Square to sing red songs and recite Mao Zedong’s poems.

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On December 25th, Shaoshan villager Li Dinghong butchered pigs and lambs to welcome the arrival of the 121th anniversary of Chairman Mao’s birth.

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On December 25th in Hunan Shaoshan. Pig, lamb and chicken blood are placed in front of Mao Zedong’s bronze statue [as a form of offering].

Comments on NetEase:

earoro [网易湖北省随州市网友]:

All hope is lost.

毛泽萝拉 [网易新疆手机网友]:

Long live Chairman Mao.

网易陕西省西安市手机网友:

All former Red Guards.

网易吉林省长春市手机网友:

Why are they all old people.

牛寡妇村村长 [网易广东省阳江市手机网友]:

Just what kind of person was he?

网易吉林省吉林市手机网友 [洪磊[官方认证:现任中国外交部新闻发言人]] 的原贴:

The Chairman’s contributions to our nation are universally recognized.

网易北京市手机网友:

Long live the Communist Party, long live Chairman Mao.

网易北京市手机网友:

Forever remembering Chairman Mao, I miss those years when there were no corrupt officials.

网易广西南宁市手机网友:

Red guards have grown old.

网易新疆乌鲁木齐市手机网友:

At least they have faith.

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  • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

    Is this why they protest the celebration of Christmas?

    Because that and Maomas are on the same day?

    • Joe

      Maosmas requires a blood sacrifice though

      • Small twon

        He prefer live human one..well pig would do until he rises from after life.

  • Charles

    Incredible… A fitting sacrifice for the man who shed more Chinese blood than anyone else in history.

    There have been many destructive, incompetent leaders in Chinese history, but he has got to be in the top 5.

    It would make much more sense to celebrate the current CCP leaders, who clearly are a thousand times more capable than this disgrace of a leader.

  • RickyBeijing

    1. 70 people?! 70?! out of a city with 25,000,000 people only 70 gave a shit? Proof that no-one gives a shit about the CCP anymore, or Mao for that matter.

    2. Butchering pigs and lambs were traditional forms of sacrifice and tribute in ancient Greece and Rome. China, you’re about 2,000 years late with that one.

    • bujiebuke

      “2. Butchering pigs and lambs were traditional forms of sacrifice and tribute in ancient Greece and Rome. China, you’re about 2,000 years late with that one.”

      WRONG

      Simpsons did it first

  • Zebadee

    People should be commemorating the deaths of 89 million + Chinese people (during peacetime) because of the most incompetent leader in world history.

    • hang

      I don’t know if incompetent is the right word. His goal was power, and he attained power. Tyrannical, ruthless, dogmatic, delusional, sociopathic… those are maybe better words for him.

      • Teacher in China

        Incompetent works for me. The Great Leap Forward was in large part due to his staggering incompetence.

        • Rick in China

          That’s a matter of perspective, though – what hang is saying and I agree with is that he reached his ‘personal’ objectives. The fact he’s still regarded so strongly in China so many years after his death speaks volumes to that — even through his incompetences from a people’s perspective, so many still revere him…therein lies the sadness.

  • Zappa Frank

    Saint Mao bring red books to good children and practices an out of term abortion on the bad ones.

  • monster

    everyghing about mao die early!
    bunch of old sb!

  • biggj

    The east is red, the sun rises.
    From China arises Mao Zedong.
    He strives for the people’s happiness,
    Hurrah, he is the people’s great savior!

    Chairman Mao loves the people.
    He is our guide
    to building a new China
    Hurrah, lead us forward!

    The Communist Party is like the sun,
    Wherever it shines, it is bright.
    Wherever the Communist Party is,
    Hurrah, there the people are liberated!

    This song fucking pumps me up!!!

    • monster

      hahahaha!
      but have to admit, mao is a good poet.

      • mr.wiener

        I don’t think he wrote ” The East is red”.

  • garbo

    Why the blood?

    • firebert5

      Most idol worship requires it. You should check out Nepal sometime.

      • monster

        most nepal saint girl at last have to become whores.

      • hang

        That’s one cult that the CCP sure approves of.

  • NorthPoints

    1.4 billion people killing pigs for blood. Mao, I was never your fan.

  • Balkan

    Blood as an offering? That says everything.

    • monster

      at least they did not put pig head on.
      normally put a sheep or pig head on.

  • mr.wiener

    Lest we forget….

  • Ken Morgan

    TBH you can find such celebrations everywhere.The odd Russian and Georgian honour stalin. Japanese people have LARGE festivals for warlords (like Oda Nobunaga and Shingen)

    • Irvin

      Nobunaga was a bad ass! I play him everytime in every samurai warriors.

      • Ken Morgan

        Sure but it is common in contemporary media to depict him as a villain figure and evil compared to other more traditional Daimo like Takeda Shingen.

        • Irvin

          didn’t say he wasn’t evil, but he’s still a bad ass.

  • Crimsonarmor

    Celebrating a mass murderer, so don’t mention everytime the Japanese leader goes to visit the shrine in his country “oh god why he did that” You guys seem no different when remembering those who butchered so many.

  • Probotector

    As expected from a bunch of throwbacks.

    • Irvin

      Who you calling throwbacks? slaying pigs is alot of work.

  • wnsk

    The poor pigs :(

  • Foreign Devil

    Satanic cult worship.

  • Rei Yu Tian

    No No No, this is the man that should be praised throughout China. Without him, you would still be stuck in the countryside working in collective farms. Deng is the man to thank for China being a modern economic powerhouse.

    Besides pulling China out of the civil war, Mao did a lot of harm to China. Thousands years of history were destroyed by the red guard & the cultural revolution ultimately did a lot more harm than good. Not to mention all of Mao’s backwards economic policies & the failure of the great leap forward.

    (FYI, my ancestors were land lords in Tianjin, lets just say that I don’t appreciate Mao taking my families land & distributing them around and then sending my grand parents to communal farms)

    • mr.wiener

      I will lift a bottle in honor of the little bottle tonight.

      • Rei Yu Tian

        Cheers~ And we also have to make a toast for the South African pilot that hit Mao Anying. If Mao Anying had survived, China would very likely have became a family regime similar to North Korea. Everyone knew Mao was grooming his son for succession, as you needed combat experience to look good in the CCP.

    • ClausRasmussen

      I agree so much. He was the best Chinese politician in the 20th century and maybe more

      • Irvin

        He did made shenzhen into what it is today, it was a dump before he push his plans. Now it’s pushing iphones and all kinds of electronics and gadgets.

        • vincent_t

          I am surprise you didn’t mention Shanghai Pudong. He was the 1 pushed for the Pudong development, and everyone else confused looking at the Pudong rice field and farm houses back then wondering what is wrong with their leader.

      • Rei Yu Tian

        Him & Zhou Enlai, probably the best Chinese politicans of the era. They shaped China the right way.

        • Irvin

          Too bad people outside of china will always remember him for the “other” thing he did with the tanks and the students.

    • Irvin

      Agree, the mao regime made my grandfather who was a surgeon into a janitor, father to jail as political prisoner and mother to farm when she was top of her school.

      Our lands got taken away too, but that’s more of the KMD era and was lands appointed by the empress, so fuck them too!

      • Rei Yu Tian

        After Ming, China had already fallen. Qing dynasty was a disaster for China. Pointless campaigns that drained the national treasure, suppression of the Han ethnicity, & corruption within the government.

        Corruption was rampant in KMD as well, I suggest you watch the film “Back to 1942”, it’s a great film by Feng Xiao Gang.

        Sorry for your family brother. *Bro hug*

        • Alex Dương

          After Ming, China had already fallen. Qing dynasty was a disaster for China. Pointless campaigns that drained the national treasure, suppression of the Han ethnicity, & corruption within the government.

          Somewhat paradoxically, the Qing ended up being disastrous for China because they kept the peace for too long after the Zunghar genocide. Without any formidable opponents between 1758 and 1839, corruption spread, and the government (including the military) grew complacent. Meanwhile, Europeans fought plenty of wars during those years, and they had to operate efficiently or else.

          • ClausRasmussen

            The big difference between the two dynasties is that the Mings were relatively open to the Western world while the Qing closed China off

          • bossel

            IIRC, it were some Qing emperors (maybe Qianlong) who were quite fond of European culture, similar to how some European monarchs were fond of Chinese culture roughly at the same time.

          • ClausRasmussen

            The Qianlong emperor did build some European style mansions but in the West he is mostly remembered as the the emperor that refused trade and cultural exchange when he rebuffed British diplomatic advances

            He is quoted for the following that may be one of history’s stupidest remarks

            >> Our Celestial Empire possesses all things in prolific abundance and lacks no product within its borders. There is therefore no need to import the manufactures of outside barbarians in exchange for our own produce

            Ouch!

          • bossel

            Refusing trade is one thing (stupid as it is), but he still had some Jesuit counsellors. Jesuit influence declined over time & as Alex already mentioned, Qianlong may have become too successful for his (empire’s) own good, but there was not really a complete break between Ming & Qing in regard to European influence.

          • Qiu Shi Sheng

            Thanks to Mao the Japs didn’t have to pay for war damages after bombing my grand father’s Hua Sheng cotton mill machinery factory in Shanghai. Kicked out of his mansion and everything stolen. Now those commie dumb asses are fighting for the Diao yu islands… China would’ve had some proof of ownership to prove to the world if they didn’t screw us over.

          • Alex Dương

            Had the CCP not won the civil war, Diaoyu would arguably be Chinese since Cold War era Communist BS wouldn’t have been relevant. Nonetheless, I concede that the Chinese, ROC or PRC, never really cared for Diaoyu before 1978. (This is in stark contrast to Tibet, Xinjiang, and the Spratlys / Paracels.)

          • Qiu Shi Sheng

            China was far too behind the times to realize oil was big business overseas…. F*ck MAO!!!!!!!!!

          • Alex Dương

            CKS voiced no complaints either. As I mentioned, Diaoyu is different from the Spratlys / Paracels because the Chinese always “cared” about them since the 1930s, and they “cared” about them before anybody knew of potential oil reserves.

          • Alex Dương

            The Qing had fairly close interactions with the Jesuits early on; for example, the Jesuits wrote the Latin version of the Treaty of Nerchinsk. (They wisely positioned themselves as the “optimal” brokers over the Mongols.) I think it was after 1689 that they started to be more closed off. Arguably, had the conflict with the Zunghars persisted after 1758, it is possible that the Qing would have felt the need to have more trade with Europe.

          • ClausRasmussen

            >> I think it was after 1689 that they started to be more closed off

            The dynasty was founded in 1644 so they spent most of the time sealed off from Western influence

            I don’t think it mattered much in the beginning of the dynasty because the West were not significantly ahead at that time, but it was a horrible wrong policy later on and the World of today is still shaped by the consequences of it

            This is the reason why I think Deng Xiaopeng was the greatest statesman China have had for centuries. He finally managed to correct that fatal mistake that cost China so much suffering

          • Alex Dương

            I don’t think it mattered much in the beginning of the dynasty because the West were not significantly ahead at that time, but it was a horrible wrong policy later on and the World of today is still shaped by the consequences of it.

            I agree that it was a huge mistake to be closed off, but I think that came from the prolonged peace that arose after the Zunghars were annihilated. Qianlong felt that he had successfully defeated all who dared to oppose him, period, so he became arrogant and complacent.

      • Rick in China

        It’s funny, almost everyone I talk to claims their family were land owners/success stories before Mao, I’ve never heard people I meet routinely proclaim that they were slaves who were freed or whatever… my wife’s grandpa was apparently a successful business owner, who was strung up/had his arms broken/murdered or something to that extent in the efforts to crush independent business. Where are all the slave offspring ffs!

  • mr.wiener

    Worse luck. It would be much easier to despise him if he was a vain~glorious hack , but alas ,life is seldom so simple.

    • David

      Naaa still pretty easy to despise him on a political and personal level.

  • hiten

    Paying tribute to the person who destroyed their own culture. I’ll never understand Chinese.

    • 42

      Actually Mao was the one who gathered arms and men to fight the japanese invasion. And after the world war fought against military feudalism mainly caused by the KMT. Without Maos intervention China would be in the brink of chaos and power struggles for decades to come with multiple Warlords controlling China, where common men and women suffered the most. With this context in mind, communism at that time was supported by the majority of chinese people and was immense popular. Admitted, Maos policy and rule was not entirely beneficial for China, but at some point necessary for further development and maturity of China. He was probably not a great leader of a country but a superb revolutionist!

      • mr.wiener

        It is debatable as to who fought the Japanese more, the KMT or or the CCP, when they weren’t fighting each other of course.

        • 白色纯棉小裤裤

          The KMT fought the Japanese more, but did not do it as effective as the CCP did. (1 million KMT soldiers surrendered and fought for Japan, WTF)

          • mr.wiener

            If “effectively” means hang back and wait for both sides to tire themselves out we are in agreement.
            A little known nugget of information is that after the surrender of Japan the KMT demobbed about a million soldiers, with nothing but the clothes they stood in… and extensive knowledge weapons caches.
            They promptly joined the CCP.

            The whole switching sides thing is very….of its time and location oriented….. Even in the Korean and Vietnam conflicts mass groups of soldiers switched sides, sometimes multiple times.

          • Irvin

            All is fair in love and war.

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            From some unbiased Chinese source I have read, the author studied Japanese records and concluded that the KMT killed 2.44 to 4 times high-level Japanese generals than the CCP did. Given that the KMT was the ruling party and the CCP was the guerrilla force, I don’t think CPP was hanging back more than the KMT did.
            And by effectively, I mean comparing the kill ratio and the number of soldiers surrendered, the KMT was miles behind. Somehow you just don’t see CCP soldiers switching sides.

          • Joe

            Because the notion of a KMT army is too broad, the National Revolutionary Army is made up of not only Central Army under Chiang but also all the local warlord militias, even the CCP divisions technically fought under the NRA banner. Those who defected to the Japanese were mostly local militias not Chiang’s core forces.

          • mr.wiener

            Care to share your unbiased sources?

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤
          • ClausRasmussen

            You don’t measure who “fought the Japanese more” by counting killed generals but by destroyed divisions. My guess is that the relatively high number of killed generals by CCP is because of ambushes or assassinations.

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            How is the number of destroyed divisions a more reliable indicator of who fought the Japanese more? Guerrilla wars normally don’t destroy divisions. The Vietnamese destroyed no American divisions but still inflicted heavy casualties on the Americans.

          • ClausRasmussen

            By “destroyed divisions” I meant killed soldiers and lost equipment. I thought that was obvious

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            Yes the best indicator is the number of killed Japanese soldiers by the KMT and the CCP respectively. However such statistical data is not available. As there were thousands of battles and the Japanese would not keep records for each of them. And both the KMT and the CCP like to exaggerate Japanese casualties in their reports.

            Another interesting indicator is the number of POWs, the CCP captured 6,200 Japaneses soldiers and the KMT only had 2,600 Japanese POWs. I am wondering what is your explanation for that.

          • ClausRasmussen

            So we agree that number of killed generals is a bad indicator ? Next, the 6200 vs. 2600 POWs are very low numbers to conclude anything from – one division that gave up fighting at the end of the war would could easily explain the difference. For comparison, Wikipedia quote both PRC and ROC sources that estimate total japanese losses to be on the scale of 2.000.000 man

            To assess the scale of fighting you need to study the combat history, for example by counting number of battles, assessing the size of the battles and then distribute the total losses over them

            I checked the 26 major battles won by the Chinese listed on Wikipedia (link below) and found that 24 of them was directly by KMT and only 2 by CCP. There are more battles, but if you do take the time to check them too, you’ll reach the same conclusion as almost everyone else: That KMT did the most of the fighting. That’s hardly controversial anymore, even in PRC

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Sino-Japanese_War#Military_engagements_of_the_Second_Sino-Japanese_War

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            Nope, the number of killed generals is the best indicator unless you can find something better.

            The number of major battles is just another joke like the number of destroyed divisions, you normally don’t see guerrillas fighting any major battles. The Saddam Government fought all the major battles against Americans, so according to you, it must have killed more Americans than the “terrorists” did, right?

            the 6200 vs. 2600 POWs are very low numbers to conclude anything from

            Japanese soldiers were extremely difficult to capture as they rarely surrender. For 6,200 captured Japanese soldier its safe to assume there were at least 62,000 killed. And the Japanese soldiers gave up fighting after Japan surrendered were not included in those numbers.

            Wikipedia quote both PRC and ROC sources that estimate total japanese losses to be on the scale of 2.000.000 man

            Those numbers are Jokes

          • ClausRasmussen

            >> Those numbers are Jokes

            I see you just ran out of arguments so instead of continuing here I’ll suggest you to spend some time on the Wiki page I referred you to. It is a fascinating read

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            This is common sense, that you can’t trust one’s report of casualties on its opponent. Only Japanese reports are reliable when studying Japanese casualties.

            And Wikipedia isn’t a good place for doing serious studies, I have read many Chinese sources on this topic that are more reliable and detailed than the wiki articles.

          • ClausRasmussen

            >> my arguments were clearly stated

            It was clearly stated but not an argument when you said “those numbers are a joke”

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            I typed 100+ words you just cherry pick the last 5 and says I have no argument. And even for the last 5 words I explained why they are a joke already.

          • Dr Sun

            I just go by watching war shows on TV and its clear the CPC killed way more, each unarmed cpc soldier could kill around 100 Japanese soldiers, destroy 5 tanks and bring down 2 aircraft per minute. KMT soldiers although armed and German trained could not get any where near that figure.
            Quote from YU Xu 14 y/o girl from a village in Hunan (later a red guard commander)
            ” I just wanted to be the first girl from my village with a confirmed Jap kill”

          • vincent_t

            A lot of these switch sides were not done voluntarily. Most of them were POW and been pushed by their captor back to the front line to perform suicidal actions.

          • Alex Dương

            Thing is, the Japanese never trusted the Chinese collaborators and seldom ordered them to fight against KMT or CCP armies. The collaborators usually surrendered quickly the few times they were ordered to fight. This is one reason why Japan did not conquer China in WWII: unlike the Yuan and the Qing, the Japanese were largely unsuccessful in using Chinese to fight Chinese.

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            According to Japanese records of battle casuaties, in many battles “皇协军” casuaties are often the same or higher than Japanese casuaties.

        • ClausRasmussen

          I think it is reasonable to say that the KMT did the most fighting and inflicted and suffered the biggest casualties, notably in the battle of Shanghai

          At the outbreak of the second Sino-Japanese war, the communists were effectively routed by KMT, the Long March was a massive retreat for CCP, and KMT still had a core of German trained elite forces that was able to keep the warlords under control

          That KMT under Chiang Kai-shek managed to bleed themselves to death against the Japanese and lose their best forces for political reasons is another thing. While we in another comment here praise Deng Xiao Peng, we should also remember to curse Chiang Kai-shek. His incompetence was the driving force in CCPs eventual victory imo.

          • Alex Dương

            While we in another comment here praise Deng Xiao Peng, we should also
            remember to curse Chiang Kai-shek. His incompetence was the driving
            force in CCPs eventual victory imo.

            I agree with you, but to be fair to CKS, he had way too much shit to deal with from 1926 to 1949: warlords, CCP, Tibet / Mongolia, Spratly / Paracel Islands, Japan, CCP again.

        • 42

          KMT did not join the fight against the japanese in full force after a much later stadium.

          Read upon the Xi’an Incident. General Chiang Kai-shek was in the midst of a civil war against the communists and basically ignored the intruding japanese which were invading most of northern China. Chiang Kai-shek wanted in fact to use the japanese forces to have two fronts fighting against the communists weakening their positions, not knowing by doing this he almost given free passage to Japan to invade whole of China.

          Ironaically, it was his own generals who kidnapped Chiang Kai-shek and forced him by gunpoint to hold a truce with the communist and collabarote forming a united force with both KMT and Communist against the invading japanese. Hence the Xi’an Incident.

          After the world war,the KMT lost thechinese civil war and fled to the current day Taiwan. Chiang Kai-shek almost sold out the entire China to the japanese and doesnt deserve sovereignty over China. Now you know why the CCP resents taiwan so much…

          • Alex Dương

            Your timeline is off because the Xi’an Incident predates the Battle of Shanghai by nine months. So it could have been the turning point of the war because it occurred before the war started.

            Moreover, it is inaccurate to say that the KMT didn’t join the war in full; the war lasted as long as it did partially because CKS essentially ordered a large chunk of his German-trained troops to fight to the death in Shanghai. The Japanese expected to take Shanghai in three days and China in three months, but Shanghai alone took more than three months. Their sacrifices made it clear to all involved that this wasn’t going to be a quick and easy war. Indeed, almost all the major battles in the Second Sino-Japanese War were fought by non-CCP NRA troops.

          • 42

            The Second Sino Japanese war began officially in 1937. But actually the invasion of imperial japan in China already started in 1931, so the war, eventhough in unofficial context, was already going on for 6 years, where CCP troops not only fought against japanese but also KMT. The fact that CCP also needed to fend of KMT gave the Japanese immense advantage to continue their expansionism in China.

            The major battles and casualties you mentioned were after the official beginning of the war (in which by the way NRA troops consists of CCP and KMT forces combined). But the numerous battles before that time are not mentioned, where CCP sacrificed as much if not, greater losses.

            Mao admitted that his CCP troops alone cannot defeat the imperial japanese army, so he pleaded an alliance with KMT, for which Chiang Kaishek ignored. Actually Mao’s plea lead to the Xian incident, and Mao is therefore recognized as the driving factor of this turning point in the History of the Sino-Japanese war, that drummed up heavy resistance against the japanese.

            It was this patriotic determination that led many chinese support the CCP after the world war, and eventually led to the victory of the chinese civil war by the communists.

          • Alex Dương

            But actually the invasion of imperial japan in China already started in
            1931, so the war, eventhough in unofficial context, was already going on
            for 6 years, where CCP troops not only fought against japanese but also
            KMT. The fact that CCP also needed to fend of KMT gave the Japanese
            immense advantage to continue their expansionism in China.

            This is very one sided. China had a civil war from 1927 to 1936 and from 1945 to 1949. That is why the CCP “needed to fend off the KMT.”

            The major battles and casualties you mentioned were after the official beginning of the war (in which by the way NRA troops consists
            of CCP and KMT forces combined). But the numerous battles before that time are not mentioned, where CCP sacrificed as much if not, greater losses.

            The “numerous battles” you refer to were part of the civil war, not the Second Sino-Japanese War.

            Mao admitted that his CCP troops alone cannot defeat the imperial japanese army, so he pleaded an alliance with KMT, for which Chiang Kaishek ignored. Actually Mao’s plea lead to the Xian incident, and Mao is therefore recognized as the driving factor of this turning point in the History of the Sino-Japanese war, that drummed up heavy resistance against the japanese.

            Of course they couldn’t. There weren’t that many of them; only the New Fourth Army and Eighth Route Army were under CCP control. All other NRA units were under KMT control, and after 1940, the CCP units didn’t participate in major battles.

            Many Chinese supported the CCP between 1945 and 1949 because the KMT were horribly corrupt whereas the CCP were relatively much less corrupt. The CCP also made much more effective use of propaganda in convincing the common people that they had their best interests at heart.

          • ClausRasmussen

            CCP also won because they managed to mobilize the country side by offering them a far better deal than KMT that was based on the middle and upper class in the cities

          • Alex Dương

            Absolutely. This was a big mistake from CKS.

          • vincent_t

            Yeap, CCP won because they managed to gain the support from the majority (farmers) by using catchy and easy to understand propaganda :打土豪分农地 (beat the oppressing landlord and re-distribute the land).It was a very successful marketing campaign, even with today standard.

          • Zappa Frank

            the redistribution of lands have always been the tool to move farmers.. everywhere and anytime
            China’s population was 90% farmers and than obviously a redistribution of lands had more appeal than anything else said by KTM

      • monster

        he tried his best to ruin the class gap among people.
        because he was from poor farmer family.
        one hand,it’s good for poor people,the other hand,all grace of upper class got ruined.
        so,poor kids got chances but the whole china became farmer style.

        • Rick in China

          Mao was from a poor family?

          The second paragraph on his wiki states: “Born the son of a wealthy farmer in Shaoshan, Hunan, Mao adopted a Chinese nationalist and anti-imperialistoutlook in early life,”

          • Dax

            Yep. The anti-intellectualism of the Cultural Revolution shows the characteristic irony present in much of the Communist party’s actions, since Mao had worked as both a schoolteacher and a librarian.

  • Free Man

    “I miss those years when there were no corrupt officials.”

    When was that?

  • JesusOfNanjing

    don’t worry; they’re almost dead.

  • Joe

    that’s because most of his poems are plagiarized from other poets there are plenty of examples of it online.

    • Irvin

      Good artist borrows, great artist steals. -Steve Jobs.

  • Kiff

    So… many… unwashed… hands…

  • Byrnzie28

    121th anniversary? Don’t you mean 121st anniversary?

    • Joe

      oops, thought it was the 120th anniversary which was last year

  • ClausRasmussen

    >> All hope is lost

    No it is not, because…

    >> Why are they all old people

  • Irvin

    Absolute power corrupts absolutely.

  • David

    “The Chairman’s contributions to our nation are universally recognized.” I believe this is true.

    Also, why are they celebrating on the 25th when his birthday was on the 26th? Not only would it be more accurate it would be a Friday.

    • Dr Sun

      recognized for what , policy that lead to the starvation and death of over 40 million people

      • David

        Yes. Those are actually my exact thoughts. I think pretty much everybody who is not working for the Chinese government has, by this time, understood what Mao being in charge of China has cost the Chinese people. It is ‘Universally recognized’

  • Mihel

    Pardon the ignorance, I’m totally not an expert of Chinese culture and less than ever on communism, but isn’t the quasi-religious offering in the last two photos the kind of thing Mao was trying to eliminate?

  • Dr Sun

    to confuse totalitarian dictatorships like China or N.Korea with communism is to show real ignorance.

    • Zappa Frank

      theoretically true, but we have yet to see a communism government that didn’t end up being a totalitarian dictatorship. Even the cult of the supreme leader is something happened in so many communist countries (and funny enough how with the change of leaders all the propaganda had to be re-written)

      • Dr Sun

        we have never seen a communist government any more than we have seen a true democracy or pluralist government, just the labels are used by the rich and powerful to get and keep power.

        Unfortunately Frank we are all to blame

        “The Only Thing Necessary for the Triumph of Evil is that Good Men Do Nothing”

        • mistertibbs4u

          “we have never seen a communist government any more than we have seen a true democracy or pluralist government, just the labels are used by the rich and powerful to get and keep power.”

          Thank you!

          “I don’t think there are any Russians… and there ain’t no Yanks… just corporate criminals… playing with tanks!” – The Call

      • 42

        Cuba is till this day the most successful communist country in this modern day world, based on pure communist principles. By successful I don’t mean wealthy. Wealth is never a goal in communism, equally distributed wealth is what its about. Therefore China cannot be considered a communist country, its a social-capitalists country with a one party system.

        North-Korea is not a communist country at all, never was, its an empire. Where the rule of the country stays in the family blood line.

        • Zappa Frank

          what of ‘social’ in china? a ‘social’ capitalist country may be one in north Europe. China has NOTHING of socialist.
          if we take in account what Marx wrote, no one of the so called communist country can be considered communist. To begin with no one among Russia, China, Cuba, North Korea and so on had ever been industrial based and with a strong middle – high class.. so far their revolution has been done by farmers and not by workers. The communism was thought to suit to west Europe, Germany in particular.

  • Dr Sun

    he isn’t actually the biggest murderer in history, for that you have to look at the Holy Roman church.

    • Rick in China

      While I ‘sort of’ agree with the fact the Church/religion is responsible for so many deaths, you’re comparing one person who, as the supreme leader of a nation, enacted policies that resulted in the deaths of tens of millions in a few years – to a global organisation over the course of centuries. That’s like saying the bubonic plague is a bigger murderer than Mao. Wait, that’s also not true, but you get the point.

      • Dr Sun

        i get your point, however i disagree in that Mao was a singular entity. If you look at at the history the CPC was and still is a church.So yes as the great leap backwards was the creation of the CPC so was the Inquisition , or the reformation. There’s no real difference between the them, they were all about a “churches” power .

        • Rick in China

          Even if we want to go that route – the Spanish Inquisition, for example, while terrible in many ways, resulted in perhaps thousands of deaths (at least by execution) over a few centuries – not millions of deaths in a few years..then again that’s executions vs. starvation due to policy, but either way I think the numbers would sway in the same direction in the end regardless of what metrics we use.

          • Dr Sun

            i don’t know Rick but I suspect if they were tearing you apart on the rack, I don’t think you would be excusing it so lightly by numbers a year, or you would with the “pear” in your mouth be a excuser for the millions who died at the hands of the Jesuits and conquistadors in a very few years in soth America.

          • Rick in China

            We were talking about numbers, no? Not methods of death. If you want to start lumping in the conquistadors in your argument, haha, then why don’t we just say “‘Murrica is most responsible”. Don’t be absurd. Your numbers, again, also don’t come close to adding up – most of the Incans, for example, died to diseases, many died due to civil war which was also brewing over the century, and the conquistadors were active in war over the course of decades not a few years. I don’t even see the parallels anyways, one is an invading force of Spanish trying to conquer new lands, another is a supreme leader invoking famine upon his own people.

  • 42

    Thats ridiculous, Mao wasnt the most vicious leader that was around, he was maybe a lousy leader that hugely mis-managed his country which made millions suffered. But comparing him with Hitler is nonsense, Hitler was at drift with expanding his territory by invading other countries and went to war with them, commited genocide by killing ethnic jews.

    Actually on a scale of crimes on humanity, Hitler is definitely first place, and he was not even a communist but a democratically elected fascist, go figure. You also cannot compare the communist red guard with the gestapo or the secret soviet police led by Stalin, which were highly ranked militarized organizations.

    The cultural revolution for example was a communal event and social movement instead of a militarized movement. the people who acted out this movement consisted of ordinary chinese civilian people, instead of organized soldiers. The cultural revolution which was probably the most deadly and chaotic purgery event in CCP history, was therefore not an organized military event, but a spontaneous civil act in chinese society at that time, ofcourse influenced by Mao.

    In other words, Mao was no way the biggest murdering monster that people are trying to portray him, and if you really have to compare with Hitler, Pol Pot or Stalin, then Mao would be at the bottom of the list in terms of all time murdering monsters.

    • Dr Sun

      I think you seriously misunderstand and/ underestimate just how Mao carefully organised, planned and controlled from the very top echelons of the central committee/ polite- bureau right down tothe village red guard the “great leap into oblivion” and the following “cultural devastation”.
      Under the singular and unchangeable control of Mao the CPC made and executed very clear policy (his policy) to kill more people (their own countrymen/women) than even Stalin did and way more than than those second division monsters Hitler, Pol Pot achieved.Therefore he will live on in infamy as the greatest single murderer of all time, to date, although I’m sure Fatty III in N.Korea is trying to catch up fast.

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