Chinese Rural Substitute Teachers Earn Little & See No Future

Luo Qilin, 25 years old, has been a substitute teacher at the Xinhe Primary School in Sichuan province for 2 years. He attended his first year of university but later for unexpected reasons dropped out. After several years in the city to seek employment, he went back home to be a substitute teacher. He feels that he's still young and should accumulate experience for now. As for the future, he doesn't worry too much.

From BJNEWS:

Rural substitute teachers attract attention, having no social status and bleak prospects

They have no social status, they earn little, and they are called “substitute teachers”, referring to those who work in rural schools as temporary teachers without formal employment, and once called civilian/private teachers [not employed by the government/state]. While the Department of Education put an end to civilian teachers as early as 1985, it is still difficult for the government to employ professional teachers because living conditions are miserable in rural areas. Currently, substitute teachers still constitute a boost to education in the western regions of China, especially the remote mountainous areas.

September 4th, substitute teacher Pan Dejiang is lining up the kids to get new schoolbags. Behind him are the 3 classrooms and one teacher's office that he and Pan Delu personally went to the county government to apply for over 20 times before finally getting it built in 2008 after finding a kind Hong Kong donor who donated 50,000 yuan.

September 4th, substitute teacher Pan Dejiang is lining up the kids to get new schoolbags. Behind him are the 3 classrooms and one teacher’s office that he and Pan Delu personally went to the county government to apply for over 20 times before finally getting it built in 2008 after finding a kind Hong Kong donor who donated 50,000 yuan.

September 3rd, a first grade girl taking care of her younger brother after returning home from school. The children in this place begin helping around the home young, and the primary school in the village gives them a chance to receive an education.

September 3rd, a first grade girl taking care of her younger brother after returning home from school. The children in this place begin helping around the home young, and the primary school in the village gives them a chance to receive an education.

Guo Shougui, 40 years old, is a substitute teacher in Jinzhong Primary School in Qianxi County, Guizhou Province. He's been a substitute teacher for 22 years, waiting wistfully to be officially employed. His monthly salary is around 1000 yuan, less than a half of what an officially employed teacher earns.

Guo Shougui, 40 years old, is a substitute teacher in Jinzhong Primary School in Qianxi County, Guizhou Province. He’s been a substitute teacher for 22 years, waiting wistfully to be officially employed. His monthly salary is around 1000 yuan, less than a half of what an officially employed teacher earns.

Pan Delu, 33 years old, has been a substitute teacher in Yanjiao Primary School, Guizhou Province, for 7 years. He strikes an iron piece to start a class, because there's no electric ring in the school. In this impoverished village, Pan's family is one of the poorest. His 16-year-old daughter, who has gone to Zhejiang Province for work, is the economic backbone of the family.

Pan Delu, 33 years old, has been a substitute teacher in Yanjiao Primary School, Guizhou Province, for 7 years. He strikes an iron piece to start a class, because there’s no electric ring in the school. In this impoverished village, Pan’s family is one of the poorest. His 16-year-old daughter, who has gone to Zhejiang Province for work, is the economic backbone of the family.

Luo Qilin, 25 years old, has been a substitute teacher at the Xinhe Primary School in Sichuan province for 2 years. He attended his first year of university but later for unexpected reasons dropped out. After several years in the city to seek employment, he went back home to be a substitute teacher. He feels that he's still young and should accumulate experience for now. As for the future, he doesn't worry too much.

Luo Qilin, 25 years old, has been a substitute teacher at the Xinhe Primary School in Sichuan province for 2 years. He attended his first year of university but later for unexpected reasons dropped out. After several years in the city to seek employment, he went back home to be a substitute teacher. He feels that he’s still young and should accumulate experience for now. As for the future, he doesn’t worry too much.

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Sun Dayang, 29 years old, unmarried, is a substitute teacher in Yinlong Primary School in western Yunnan Province. Presently, his monthly salary merely amounts to 700 to 800 yuan. He says that he dares not dream about marriage, and if he should not be employed within three years, he'll seek other ways out.

Sun Dayang, 29 years old, unmarried, is a substitute teacher in Yinlong Primary School in western Yunnan Province. Presently, his monthly salary merely amounts to 700 to 800 yuan. He says that he dares not dream about marriage, and if he should not be employed within three years, he’ll seek other ways out.

In Yanjiao Primary School, Senshan Village, Guiding County, Guizhou Province, many children play around in the underdeveloped playground in the late afternoon. In this remote Miao (an ethnic minority group in China) village, both boys and girls can go to school; enrollment rate is 100%.

In Yanjiao Primary School, Senshan Village, Guiding County, Guizhou Province, many children play around in the underdeveloped playground in the late afternoon. In this remote Miao (an ethnic minority group in China) village, both boys and girls can go to school; enrollment rate is 100%.

Pan Dejiang's "Blood Donation Card". In the past, Pan Dejiang could "sell blood" every month using this card and get 300 yuan in income, with this being an important source of income. Now that the blood donation site has closed, this source of income is gone too.

Pan Dejiang’s “Blood Donation Card”. In the past, Pan Dejiang could “sell blood” every month using this card and get 300 yuan in income, with this being an important source of income. Now that the blood donation site has closed, this source of income is gone too.

The Principal’s selling blood draws public attention

Around the formerly obscure Yanjiao Primary school, access roads have been constructed, walls have been built, and donations have come within a month. These changes were led to by our newspaper’s report on August 8th about the closing of a blooding drawing site in Guizhou Province. It was reported that substitute teachers there had to “sell” blood to make a living, which drew widespread attention of the general public.

The Principal of Yanjiao Primary School Pan Dejiang and a teacher there Pan Delu are substitute teachers. Strictly speaking, the school in which they are teaching is just a education site organized by the village. In the school, there are more than 60 students from the first to the third grade. The two teachers’ monthly salaries are only 280 yuan, so they have to sell their blood to have additional income of 300 yuan. After the closing of the blood drawing site, they are struggling with making a living. Thanks to the contributions from kind donors, they can continue teaching in the school.

No social status, no future.

In Jinzhong Primary School, Qianxi County, Guizhou Province, Guo Shougui, a 40-year-old substitute teacher, has been teaching in the school for 22 years. For all these years, he missed numerous chances of being officially employed. He says he’s been a teacher for so many years and can’t do jobs other than this. All he wishes is to be officially employed one day.

Sun Dayang, 29 years old, is a substitute teacher in Yin Long Primary School, Yunnan Province. His father is also a teacher, so after graduation, his family used social connections to help him land the job, hoping someday he will be officially employed by the government. Young and ambitious, Sun chose to went to the city for work, but the unexpected death of his father and sister drew him back home where he had to both take care of his mother and be a substitute teacher again.

It is not uncommon to see such substitute teachers as Guo Shougui and Sun Dayang in the southwestern regions of China. The number ranges from tens to hundreds in every county. Some of the teachers are registered in the local Education Committee, while some are employed by the village alone. Relevant governmental departments know this, but generally don’t have them registered, so exact statistics are unable to be compiled.

Hard living conditions, impossible official employment

Several years ago, the government integrated numerous primary schools in villages of rural mountainous areas to larger schools in the town. Before long, local Education Committees began to reopen those schools in villages because students there had difficulty traveling long distance to the larger schools. However, there was a shortage of teachers and other staff members due in great part to hard living conditions, which left the schools no choice but to employ local residents with relatively high levels of education to be substitute teachers (In rural villages of the southwestern China, a high school education is considered to be highly educated). In schools in the major cities or towns, an officially employed teacher can enjoy benefits from institutional units owned by the state, so it’s competitive to be such a teacher; without good social connections, one can hardly be employed. After 2 or 3 years’ service, lots of such officially employed teachers were on “loan” to other departments (where they don’t have to teach anymore), so substitute teachers are always needed.

Written by Paul

Paul is an English teacher whose lupine exterior conceals the nature of a real human being. He lives in Chengdu

  • MeiDaxia

    Man. This is the kind of place I want to be, helping out in what ways I can. I could at least offer them some hope. Right now I’m in a middle school in a large Chinese city, but even there the quality of the classroom materials is mediocre at best.

    • Kyle

      You have a good attitude. I hope you can help out. It’s important to know that the classroom material is not what is the most important. It is smart, well behaved students who are eager to learn. China has that.

      Here in America, we have good quality materials in most schools, but we have a large number of students who are dumb, lazy, and cause lots of trouble.

      Don’t let the situation get you down too much. Good luck.

    • mr. weiner

      I’m planning to do some of that too after I’ve run my business for the next ten years. Plenty of Aborginal schools up in the backwoods of Taiwan could use some English teachers for little or no money and I already have plenty of contacts. It would be nice to teach them some rugby also.

      • Kyle

        English speaking Taiwanese Aboriginal rugby players will be quite interesting to see.

        • Tengu

          Especially when they’re speaking with Mr. Weiner’s Aussie accent.

      • Melbournian

        That’s funny, since there’s plenty of Aboriginal schools up in deserts of Australia who could use some English teachers for little or no money..

        • mr. weiner

          I’d love to mate, but my wife, business and morgage are all in Taiwan, I could still live in Taipei and get to the mountain tribes in about two hours. It’d be a bit of a commute to get to the top end from melbourne every weekend.
          Me aunty , who is a bit of a do-gooder [bless her heart] Went up to arnhem land a couple ‘a years back to help out with some social programs and reconed she couldn’t get a thing done between all the charities and welfare groups all in-fighting with each other for the money and all the “coconuts” with their hands out , making sure none of the funds got through to anyone who needed it.
          “Coconut” incidently is what black fellas call aboriginals from the south of Oz. They recon they’re white on the inside and dark on the outside.

          • whododat

            I’d love to mate, but my wife don’t,

            What the fuck mate?

            Go do her anyways.

          • mr. weiner

            Sorry, talking ‘strine to a fellow Melbournian, you’re presumably north American so I’ll try to …type…sloowly.

          • whododat

            You are NO Aussie and most Melbournians are Greeks, so you are and that means you ain’t no Aussie from the world under.

            You are a banana and a white wannabe living like a white master in Taiwan, ain’t ya?

          • G$

            I’m gonna presume and hope that whododat was tongue in cheek and meant that as: what the fuck, mate?

          • whododat

            Fucking trolls are so smart, ain’t they?

          • mr. weiner

            Apparently not.

          • Melburnian

            Where are you from? .. In Austraya.
            Where I’m from coconuts are Samoans and Islanders..

          • Melburnian

            Also, whodowhat, what are you? A baby boomer? It’s all about the Indians these days.

          • mr. weiner

            I’m from Mornington originally, currently residing in Taiwan. Got a few contacts in the top end so I talk like them a bit. Whododat is an interesting character. Given his obvious dislike of “white masters” and his wish for Zhongguo uber alles [and his crap English] I’d hazard the guess that he is ethnic chinese living in the US and got picked on in school by all the white kids.

        • 麵條

          Our dear Julia has proposed 100K packages to entice teachers to remote Aboriginal communties. A bit like the scheme in NSW.
          Remote does not necessarily equate to the central desert regions.
          No easy solution to the problems of the NT, try taking away abused children from mongrel parents and you’ll be accused of trying to re-enact laws akin with the Stolen Generation.

    • Choonage

      While that’s a really admirable thing to do, you have to realize the living conditions in rural China are pretty awful. You might not have running water, shower, access to adequate medical facilities and basic necessities like toiletries. UPS/Fedex might not deliver there. Good luck getting internet access too.

      • Brett Hunan

        Had a buddy who lived in Yushu, Qinghai… The place with the earthquake last spring. Yea, life was not as convenient as back in America, but if what you want to do is live with and invest in a community, then you live like those people do. If you just want a vacation in rural China, go to a slightly more developed area for the comforts you mentioned.

      • whododat

        “you have to realize the living conditions in rural China are pretty awful. You might not have running water, shower, access to adequate medical facilities and basic necessities”

        NOT even in the USA would anyone want this kind of teacher for their kids, he cannot even teach basis plumping or any simple thing in first aid or how to brush one’s teeth.

        He is fired.

        • Tengu

          I don’t think the school is the proper venue for your child to learn about “plumping.”

    • Tmstr

      I was for a time one of two foreigners in a county town in western China, with a population of around 150k.

      A family friend who is a teacher at the local high school said they would really be happy to have a foreign teacher for a while, and did I want to teach there. I said I don’t have a work certificate, but that I would teach two or three evenings a week for free. It could only be during evenings, as I have other things to attend to during the day.

      They asked me to come in and talk, then said as they would want me to teach the youngest grades, I would need to come in at 7.50am every morning. I said morning would be no good as my wife and I have a baby on the way, but that if they wanted me to teach the senior classes any evenings, to let me know.

      They never got back to me. My wife reckons the english teachers are afraid they’ll lose face when I find out how poor the kids’ english is. Didn’t bother me either way, but it was a strange episode.

      • ozming

        I think your wife’s comment is spot on. Though relatively younger generation in China can read English better now, when I was in Guangzhou in 1980s, one of my colleagues had taught for so many years yet actually you would simply not be able to understand what he read unless the text was in front of you. And with so many mistakes in pronunciation having been enforced for too long, any improvement, if possibly, wouldn’t happen within short period of time. And that was in a big city which should have had better resources compared to a small one where you were in.

  • I’m a fat dog

    This sofa is mine

    • eattot

      Your a fat pig!

      • Capt. WED

        grandma still waiting for that grandson. get busy.

        • eattot

          哼!
          i am geting married very soon, stop mocking at me now.
          and maybe will run a western restaurant.
          heng!

          • Capt. WED

            please. 妹妹你好肉麻啊。。。

          • Capt. WED

            要跟你姐F学习呀,开一个blog要比破bi饭店好多了!

          • cb4242

            @eattot

            if true, please make sure you don’t use rat meat in ANY of your cuisines! Try to use real natural ingredients which in China might be a difficult task and get a good insurance policy, looks like you are really gonna need it. lol

        • eattot

          hehehe!
          yes, it’s lousy, it’s cheap, it’s whatever….
          hope you can afford then.

          • seriously!
            can you two BE QUIET
            am trying to read the comments!

      • I’m a fat dog

        lol you’re a ugly ho

        • eattot

          ugly son of bitch! even yourself admit from the name, maybe already from heart, hehe! or why would love to be a dog??? bitch around and eat shit?

          • I’m a fat dog

            dogs are still worth more than you cheap whore. :)

          • eattot

            you see, you admit that!
            son of bitch, son of bitch, wow, how many dogs your mom fucked to have you?

          • I’m a fat dog

            roflmaozedong how many pigs have your parents fucked?

            http://en.gravatar.com/in555

            look at your piggy nose. haha

  • nn

    I wish one day when I go back I would volunteer teaching in both city and rural areas. In fact, the children of migrant workers in the cities also need social concern. I remember in 2006 I volunteered at a school in Beijing and I was shocked that the school only had two teachers. Students were wild, because they didn’t have teachers and their parents didn’t have time to take care of them.

  • This is absolutely nothing Michelle Pheiffer and Coolio’s best hit can’t fix, retitled “Fama’s Paradise”.

  • 山炮 ShanPao

    I am shocked by the mention of his salary being at 1,000RMB a month… that’s actually not so bad. Considering the cost of goods in such rural locations he could live a fairly decent lifestyle. I guess this article has more to do with the Chinese psyche that one must live in big city and earn over 10,000rmb a month, have an apartment and own a car in order to be considered a human being.

    I know of Chinese teachers who live in medium sized cities, not so far from Beijing who are earning 1500-2000RMB a month, granted they have dormitory accommodation included. Even so, foreigners are earning about 5,000yuan a month and can afford to travel and go out on the lash every night. Hmm, this reminds me of all those times I have heard Chinese people say “China is very poor.”

    • MeiDaxia

      That 1000RMB has to pay for their accommodations and everything for the month, though. I’m not saying rural accommodations are expensive, but accommodation anywhere isn’t cheap in China…

      • Nuro

        And I guess the most important here is not the sum itself, it is probably possible to have an accomodation and to eat for this price, but what about having a family? No way! they are not even officially employed, which means they will have no securities for the future…

    • Brett Hunan

      1000RMB salary isn’t “not so bad”. One can live on 1000 a month in the countryside only if you are cooking your own food, never ever go out with friends, rarely visit your family, and your home is provided by the school.

      The teachers out in the country in Hunan were making less than 700 their first year, and got incremental raises as they took more responsibility and gave more of their life away to the school. The teachers I talked to also wanted to find side jobs, but it was too difficult because teachers work from 7a-9p and weekends are never off.

      Cost of goods isn’t much different in the countryside. Sure, most is cheaper than Beijing, but things like taxi fares or other forms of transportation aren’t really regulated and start much higher. Problem is that for most people who need to get home on a weekend, birthday, or holiday it can cost over 100RMB for a 30 minute ride.

      The teachers who are in this article and have this kind of life are usually great people and very influential in the students’ lives…. but they get broken down after years of little pay/high stress. Thats when you get the situations where teachers start to use corporal punishment and students try to jump off of the 2nd floor balcony.

      • 山炮 ShanPao

        Hey mate, your preaching to the choir.

        • Andy

          “your” ? ! I hope YOU’RE not a teacher ! :-)

          • 山炮 ShanPao

            ‘Your’ on the internet mate, dont get upset by every word that isnt spelt according to ‘your’ dictionary. Just like my spelling, life is too short. Typos happen, people take short cuts and ‘your’ wasting ‘your’ time trolling on people whom you think you can belittle. Kick back open a beer and breathe out gently.

            I was a teacher, but now I am a Phd student and I can spell when I want to (in multiple languages actually.) C ya (oh sorry, ‘see you soon’ fruitcake.)

        • Brett Hunan

          Well, I didn’t mean to “preach”, but if there is one thing I know in China, its country life. Did a 2 year stint there a few years back and I learned a lot about the way things work…

          Anyways I knew that my meager salary was still way better than the Chinese teachers were earning and I was just getting by eating at home and not leaving campus often.

          • 山炮 ShanPao

            I totally agree with your points, I didn’t mean to sound as if I was contradicting you at all. I have also spent a lot of time in rural China and I am writing my thesis on the perceived criminality of China’s rural migrant workers. I’ve spent a great deal of time talking to rural people in China gaining first hand accounts of life in the countryside and experienced it myself for two years. I was simply stating that 1,000rmb is still in my opinion a lot more than many people get, including many teachers.

        • Tengu

          He did give you a smiley face at the end!

      • Shanghairen

        A lot of those people in the villages are making 500 yuan per month (sometimes less), so 1000 is not bad. He’s probably one of the richest people living in the village.

        • 山炮 ShanPao

          This lao wai thanks your intelligence. This Lao wai offers you a smoke .
          s
          s
          ======s

        • he xie

          Shanghairen, would you like to be living off 1000 a month? Would that be not bad?

          • paradoxer

            Obama says that $17,000.00 a year in the US is a good income and that is better than what 60% of Americans make. So 1,000rmb a month is about the same as the average what the Americans on welfare gets, not bad but not good neither.

    • Justin

      I don’t mean to personally attack you Shanpao but I think your post shows a little bit of ignorance about the true cost of living here.

      I have to agree with the other posters. While it costs a lot less out in the countryside, (I was just out in rural Hubei), I wouldn’t say that most things cost half as much. But daily necessities like food cost very little because the vegetables and meat do not have far to travel. You can also save a lot on produce in large cities even like Beijing by shopping at small shops rather than stores.

      But even considering all these factors, 1,000 is very low for the long hours they have to work and the important role they play though they aren’t sufficiently educated. I think it would be close to impossible to live on that almost anywhere in China. Pensioners can do it by collecting cans and stuff on the side and getting support from family.

      Furthermore, foreigners aren’t earning 5,000. They are making at least twice that or 8,000 minimum plus room and board and probably in the case of more than a few help from mom and dad. 5,000 is what lower-level urban Chinese workers are making and barely subsisting on. Migrant worker incomes and incomes for fresh college graduates are at about 2,000 and 2,500, respectively, and most of the college grads are struggling to survive, packed ten to a room in their “ant tribes.”

      You probably see the price difference through another lens than the average Chinese person does. For example, when I went to Hubei, I thought everything there is so inexpensive. Cheap means something else entirely the more that your money is limited. It’s one thing to note in passing that things are much cheaper in relativity. It’s another thing to be handed that budget and to actually try to live off it.

      • 山炮 ShanPao

        Oh yeah, I hadn’t seen it through your brilliant perspective… come on!

        First of all I (yes a foreigner) was earning 5,000 a month in a city and my fellow teachers (yes Chinese) were earning 1,000 a month – this was in a high school, This was in the city of Chengde, Hebei, this city is not in the countryside, this city is very small by Chinese terms, this was the highest wage paid to foreigners in chengde, some were on 3,500, this was ample cash to eat out every night, this was good for the pub, this was also good for travelling around.

        I have also lived for 2 years in rural Sichuan, this was much cheaper than chengde, this was much cheaer than Chengdu or Chongqing, this lao wai did not stay in a 5 star hotel, this lao wai slummed it like everyone else, this lao wai lived on less than 1,000rmb a month, this lao wai was a very happy lao wai, this lao wai does not aspire to drive a Mercedes.

        Do you know what countryside is, are you sure your not talking about towns outside of Beijing and Shanghai and not the real Chinese countryside that this article is referring to? I noticed one commenter said they had lived “off campus” most of the time…. what campus? these kinds of places are not big enough to have a campus. I think your definition of countryside might be somewhat warped.

        • Justin

          Well, also I don’t know if you live in the countryside now, but inflation is a bitch and most surveys I’ve read have found that people are now finding the costs of living unbearable everywhere. People are especially hit hard by the rising cost of pork.

          Anyways, your point seems to be that you can live on 1,000 wherever you go so long as it’s in this truly “rural China” that is ambiguously and uniformly defined. And I don’t think you can. The fact that you lived on less than 1,000 in rural Sichuan 2 years ago doesn’t mean anything. That was 2 years ago. Given that inflation has been especially high these past two years, don’t you think 1,000 is worth less than it was 2 years ago> These schools are in lots of locations with different costs of living. The point is that where they happen to be at this time, they cannot afford to live. I don’t see why that is so incredible to you.

          • 山炮 ShanPao

            And your response was based on the assumption that this lao wa lived in Sichuan 2 years ago, when this lao wa just returned from Sichuan in July to begin his little lao wai studies on a subject very closely related to the one we are talking about.

            This lao wai is still in the circle.

            This lao wai laughs at poor comprehension skills and says try again.

            This lao wai was never disputing 1,000kwai is not much money, but this lao wai thinks of reality. This lao wai believes these teachers are doing a fantastic job and lao wai’s heart goes out to them. But this lao wai also understands the nature of the environment they are living in and the situation they have found themselves in. Do you think they should be able to move to the city and get the money… leave the kids in an empty school? This lao wai realises that China’s grossly disparate income is a factor and this lao wai realises the communities they work within have a poor economy.

            This lao wai believes the world is not fair.

            This lao wai believes 1,000 kwai is still a reasonable amount for many people…

            In the countryside AND cities there are many people earning a lot less.

            This lao wai is tired of discussion going nowhere, repeating himself again and again. This lao wai turns a page.

  • Tom from “Seeing Red in China” has an excellent post about substitute teachers.
    http://seeingredinchina.com/2011/08/29/teaching-in-the-countryside-why-teachers-cant-wait-to-leave/

    I will let myself to quote from it:
    “The schools use these teachers to cheaply staff their classes (largely due to a restricted budget) even though the practice is considered illegal. The school will fire these teachers just before an inspection to clear them from the records, and then hire them as soon as the inspectors are gone.”

  • M.N

    Song of the article
    Ice Cube – You know how we do it

  • Meh

    These are the kind of people who should be looked up to as role models. Sure they want/need more pay but they all sound so selfless. Good people they are.

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  • freddynyc

    PLenty of hot young girls – just sayin….

    • FYIADragoon

      Gotta get ’em young, fresh outta’ the womb.

    • whododat

      They ain’t got “PLenty of hot young girls ” in Afrika, not the ones you want to wrap around and gang bang anyways.

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  • Canadian_Skies

    No way. China is the richest country in the world. They couldn’t possibly still be holding on to the “We’re still a developing country” cry, are they?

    How much time do they need? Have they given an answer?

    I bet the P.R.C. sent his family a bill for the cost of the bullet used to murder him to make another example of what happens to those that reveal a national embarrassment.

    I’m critical, because I believe those people deserve better.

  • What is the old adage? “Swollen in head, weak in legs, sharp in tongue but empty in belly.”

    Looks like Beijing is not as far away as it once was…

    • Canadian_Skies

      Hey, that’s so fitting.

      Sam, you really are quite clever, despite what everyone else says.

  • Song of the Article

    山人乐队 Mountain Men
    -学习 Study

    http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMjU1MjAzMjY0.html

    • eattot

      your mixed?
      why you know china so well?
      frurry head?

  • Aituo

    Pan Delu, 33 years old. With a 16 year old daughter in Zhejiang.

    That means he was a 12 year old father.

    • [email protected]

      it was probably a mistake. I’m sure they meant to say his sixteen year old son

    • CeP

      33 – 16 = 17. You may want to join Pan Delu’s math class…

  • Just John

    See, now these are true Chinese.
    True Chinese are not rich, money grubbing whores. They are dirt poor.

    • Tengu

      I can’t speak to the salaries, and how cheap it is , how expensive it os, if they’re unfair or these guys are living the lush life.

      I simply find teaching to be one of the most noble profession and these guys seem to be at it against pretty hefty odds.

      Admirable men to me…they haven’t abandoned the kids.

      • Just John

        Actually, mine was more a spoof on some of the regular comments we see around here. It seems if someone actually wants to make more money, wants to secure a good income (gold digging biotches), want to actually get some luxury item, etc., then they are labeled as money grubbing whores, in different language, and not true to the Chinese ideal (capitalist running dogs, whatever).

        It would be great to have a comparison and contrast to stories like this and other stories about people who are trying to earn enough money to do more than just exist.

        • Tengu

          We could send them some Hermes belts!

          • Just John

            I was thinking of a mistress. Guo Mei Mei seems to need a firm hand and a grounding in reality.

          • mr. weiner

            I seem to remember something about some poor , pissed off teacher somewhere out in Henan [?]province who decided he was as mad as hell and wasn’t going to take it anymore…hmm can’t remember his name…Mao something.
            How many pissed of techers out in the sticks will be ready to raise hell when all the factory jobs start drying up in the next decade…..?

          • whododat

            Yo yo yo mr. weiner, you better make room for all them Chinese coming over for tea, won’t ya?

            China will do as the Aussies did after the welfare system crashed in your country not that long ago, send the people out of the country to look for work and send the money home.

          • mr. weiner

            Our welfare system crashed??…Must have missed that one whilst I was parking my kangeroo. Your knowledge of international events is truely impressive, keep up the good work son, you’re a stelar example to us all.

          • whododat

            Where have you been you shithead racist? In China may be? Screwing them China girls all those years?

            You gotta be a China man or a brown banana, you have no clue of Aussie history, do ya mate.

            So how do you like them muslims screwing your racist ass country to the wall of their mosques?

            I hear there will be a mosque on every corner and where the whites once lived.

            Your country don’t like Chinese in your country but you go the yellow peoples country to teach English, to fuck and live, cocksuckers deserve the muslims and Tamil tigers in your land.

            Do the Chinese a favor and stay the fuck out of China that’s Hong Kong, Tibet and Taiwan as well, since you muslim terrorists don’t let Chinese into your racist country any ways.

          • mr. weiner

            This is why drugs and typing don’t mix…

  • chupacabra

    so discouraging to see people sacrifice money/time and the chance of landing a good job to help their country and see them get trample, paid worst than any job cleaning a toilet and without a chance of ever moving/receiving help from the government

  • queenkat

    Just imagine what the money that you are spending in Starbucks,just one coffee’s price can do for such a place.
    I like how the kids look at Luo Qilin on the picture. Adorable.

  • paradoxer

    Any real Chinese posters here?

    Reading all these China basher’s comments is making me mad as hell and I am not pleased at all to see so many westerners talking shit about China and making fun of Chinese people. China and the Chinese people there are getting fucked by westerners teaching English to their kids and the Chinese don’t know it.

    Damn the Chinese western worshippers in China.

    • mr. weiner

      People in glass houses sir.
      Blame the tide of weird-arsed whiteys that have washed up in China if you wish, but they do offer you a different perspective on what is happening in China.I’m not saying their opinions are all correct [far from it in many cases], but their insights are valuable to gain a broader idea of both what is happening in China and what the international community understands of it.

    • maja

      where do you live?

  • acheron

    I dont understand how come the PRC goverment still cutting the number of teachers and the funding on education these years.
    I have a uni friend did an volunteer teaching program a few years ago, he said even in the costal cities, many of the kids in rural areas cant get the very basic education,thats pathetic…

  • ~Yellow Fever~

    Luo Qilin can be my subsitute teacher any day!~

  • samuel welsh

    unfair stuff
    keep fighting in there

  • 麵條

    Why should it take the well intentioned charity of HongKongers to build schools for rural kids in the mainland?
    Even schoolbags are a luxury for many rural children.
    Travelling on the slow train from Guangzhou through Guangxi and Guizhou provinces on the way back to Chengdu I couldn’t help but notice the signs written on the sides of buildings in many of the rural villages we passed extorting parents to send their kids to school. With what money? And to what school?

  • actionjksn

    In the USA we also have substitute teachers. They are also payed very poorly. Our full time teachers make between 35,000 to 50,000 US dollars per year, some places maybe more, plus they get health insurance and retirement pensions and they complain that they don’t make enough money. The substitute teachers only make about 100 US dollars per day. But I don’t think they are required to have more than a bachelors degree. While regular teachers all must have a Masters degree in education. In the USA if you have the required degrees, you should always be able to get a full time job somewhere. America does not have anywhere that doesn’t have state run schools with full time teachers. The Chinese government is screwing you guys over big time. You know they have the money to give all the Chinese people real schools with qualified teachers. Our teachers also can retire and collect a retirement pension and then go get another job and draw the retirement check plus get payed to still teach. And the tax payers get stuck with the bill. Which is a bunch of bull shit really. It’s things like this why our country is broke. So it sounds like China and USA are both fucked up, just for different reasons.

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