Non-Chinese Take To Twitter To Stop Dog Meat Festival

Non-Chinese Take To Twitter To Stop Dog Meat Festival

Recently, non-Chinese Internet users and animal rights activists have opposed the Yulin Dog Meat Festival in Guangxi. Starting in May 250,000 tweets have been created in an effort to stop the festival using the hashtag #StopYulin2015. Most of the festival opposition comes from America, England, and Australia, however, some Chinese netizens think that since these people also eat beef they aren’t qualified to speak out against dog meat. Other netizens think that eating dog meat is one thing but creating an entire festival for it is too cruel.

Source: Tencent

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  • none their business.
    one day when no food to eat, human would also eat other people.
    it happened in old chinese history already.

    • mr.wiener

      In fairly recent Chinese history as well.
      …but you are correct, the only people who should stop the Chinese Eating dog are the Chinese..The practice is declining anyway.
      Incidently the Swiss apparently also eat dogs ,but perhaps are wise enough to not hold a festival about it.

      • Zappa Frank

        Swiss eat dogs? never heard. i know some places in italy were they eat cats…there was even a tv program where an old man taught how to prepare a cat, but after that recipe he had been banned from tv.

        • mr.wiener

          Apparently yes…incidentally please don’t tease the dog, even when it is a bitch ;)

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_meat

          • Zappa Frank

            thanks for the link, i’ve noted is a kind of meat full of fats, by far more than the beef and the pork.. not sure is so healthy

      • James

        my friend from arkansas says they often eat cats

    • Teacher in China

      Old Chinese history as in 1958-1962? Not so old.

  • KamikaziPilot

    Nothing surprising here. To me if you eat meat and criticize others for doing the same you lose all credibility. Doesn’t matter if it’s cow, pigs, dogs, whale, fish, horse, etc. I do draw the line though if the animals are endangered or made to suffer unnecessarily. Based on what I’ve heard some dogs suffer a needlessly cruel death so I’d be against killing dogs like that, but not because they’re dogs.

    • Zappa Frank

      it is the disneayan vision of nature, animals are humanized and some are more popular. People scream in anger about japanese killing dolphins while other species that are on the edge of extintion are ignored.

      • bujiebuke

        The voice of the mob is not always in sync. My problem with Japanese and Faroese dolphin hunting is that they do it in a barbaric way that prolongs suffering, similar to the cat and dog preparation in China.

        • KamikaziPilot

          I understand the cat and dog preparation in China the same way you do but regarding the whale hunting, how else are you supposed to kill the whales that would be more humane? An rocket propelled grenade to the head? I thought the Japanese use exploding harpoons don’t they? Based on internet comments a lot of the objectors to the whales hunts give reasons like the whales are magnificent, intelligent and endangered (not true for the most part). No matter how the whales are killed there will always be people who vilify whales hunters, and most of these people probably eat meat themselves.

          • bujiebuke

            I actually mentioned dolphin hunting, and the two examples I gave continue to use traditional methods of hacking and slashing, but we can talk about whaling.

            That’s question which can be solved by technology, they need a device that can take the animal out of its misery quickly. Exploding harpoons were intended for quick kills, but their rate of success is poor. Norway actually uses grenades… I suppose that’s effect.

            My understanding of whaling in Japan is that public consumption is limited to the older generation, and its overall popularity is on the decline. It’s more that the whaling industry is trying to create demand than actually meeting it.

          • KamikaziPilot

            Okay I misread dolphin for whales but same concept. Whenever I read the comments on any kind of article regarding either whales or dolphin killing I get the feeling that people are against it mainly because they consider the animals magnificent, intelligent and endangered and other arbitrary crap like that. A minority of posters mention the cruelty. But do you really think if the Japanese or Faroese used grenades these same people against it will back off? Maybe a very small minority but most will still insist it’s “wrong” just because they’re whales/dolphins.

            Whaling isn’t even profitable in Japan as the government subsidizes it and the vast majority of Japanese never even ate whale before. You’re right, there is excess whale meat every year in Japan.

          • bujiebuke

            But do you really think if the Japanese or Faroese used grenades these same people against it will back off?

            My guess would be no. As you’re probably aware, in every movement there are people who lack critical thinking skills which detract from the greater message. This also applies to eating dogs or cats – if the cruelty was removed from the equation, would people stop protesting? Probably not.

            Somewhat tangential:
            My other issue is that animal cruelty is often painted as an “Asian only” issue in the west by the media. It seem that whenever a psychotic person in the Americas burns a cat alive, the issue is ascribed to that individual. On the other hand, when a similar news comes from China, it’s attributed as an Asian proclivity.

          • Boris

            I wouldn’t say an Asian only thing. Africa doesn’t fair too well either.

          • bujiebuke

            Perhaps I’m being a bit U.S.-centric, but whenever someone talks about eating dog/cat, asians get mixed into the conversation as well. I’ve never heard of that behavior being ascribed to Africans.

          • Boris

            Cat seems to be only ascribed to East Asians. I have seen dog being used for Africans (not as much as East Asians though) as well as monkeys/gorillas.

    • Boris

      ‘made to suffer unnecessarily’ – I think that is the main issues many have. The dogs are made to suffer.

      • KamikaziPilot

        Yes many have this issue, as do I and I hope most other reasonable people. However, I’m pretty sure even if these dogs were killed in a humane way, there would be no shortage of “protesters” from these same countries. I’ll leave everyone to figure out the reasons why.

        • Boris

          I do think there would still be some protests, but the general feeling I get from people who have been to Asia (Korea, China, Japan, Thailand and Cambodia) is the willingness to try such dishes. I’ve met an American woman who was willing to try dog (even though she has had dogs as pets before) but would not do so because of the treatment.

          It’s like the Brits I know who won’t eat horse at home but then go somewhere and try it out.

          And if you were to keep up with news back home (UK and Europe) there is some kerfuffle about Halal (and by extention Kosher) slaughter.

          • KamikaziPilot

            I agree with you. I think the “protesters” in general aren’t part of the same group who are willing to try dog when visiting Asia. Now as far as what percentage of the population in say England would condemn the Chinese for eating dog (not necessarily the dog festival), I have no idea.

          • Boris

            Eating dog in England most likely get plenty of complaints. Not sure how eating it in China would get complaints in England. I think most people are probably unaware of the dog meat festival.

          • KamikaziPilot

            But then how do you explain this story where people thousands of miles away are complaining about something that doesn’t even effect them? If you run a story in England about people in China eating dog (not necessarily the festival), I’m sure there would be plenty of people vilifying all Chinese people as dog eaters and less than human because of it. Just look at the stories about Japanese whaling.

          • Boris

            Probably because they read it in a news segment. Such as those people killing whales or was it dolphins on some remote island had people up in rage.

            And people in the UK would probably not look favourably at Chinese that eat dog. You will get some who understand diets are differnent. I do think most won’t care unless the animals are being harmed.

          • KamikaziPilot

            “Probably because they read it in a news segment”

            My point is that these actions happened far away, in a completely different culture. How they heard about it is irrelevant. These complainers are using their cultural norms to vilify a whole group of people halfway around the world, who are doing something that has zero effect on those complaining about it.

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            Those people are either too stupid to know how chicken and pigs are treated in animal farms in their own “civilized” country or being hypocrite.

          • mr.wiener

            My only objection would be skinning beating or burning the dog alive in order to ensure the meat is full of adrenaline.

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            I don’t see how torturing for better taste is different from torturing to save cost.

          • Boris

            Or animal rights activist/vegans. There are people condemning both.

            Though the level of harm dished out seems to on another level. I don’t see people choking dogs/chicken/cows before beating them to death or beating them in order to get a higher price from the animal lovers. I also don’t think they could do it in public and get away without any repercussions from the law.

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            Billions of animals suffered for their whole life , comparing to that the beating of some dogs is just a drop in the ocean, I don’t see why people like you are so concerned about the later but careless about the former . If the people who beat one dog to death cannot get away without any consequences, then what about the people who imprisoned and tortured tens of thousands of animals (aka animal farm owners)?

          • Boris

            I am not concerned more for one over the other. If you make such assumptions, can we assume you prefer dogs being beaten to death in public with no legal repercussions than doing the same in private and if getting caught ending up in prison or paying fines (if it were a corporate thing).

            Because, while billions of animals have suffered, when light was thrown onto animal abuse, companies operating in Europe and US had to improve their standards. Sure, they may not be the best. Sure, there are still people who are abusing the system. And sure, there are those who still make animals suffer for a profit there. But if caught there are repercussions by the law – which you seem to completely miss out.

            Your point seems to be that it is OK to skin, beat and burn a dog alive because others keep battery farmed chicken.

            You do know you can condemn both, right?

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            Because, while billions of animals have suffered, when light was thrown onto animal abuse, companies operating in Europe and US had to improve their standards. Sure, they may not be the best. Sure, there are still people who are abusing the system. And sure, there are those who still make animals suffer for a profit there. But if caught there are repercussions by the law – which you seem to completely miss out.

            Please go educate yourself. Only 2% of all american chicken are not caged or crammed together and fed antibiotic. It is perfectly legal to make chicken suffer, unless you don’t consider caging and feeding drugs a suffering. Over past few dozen years chicken are forced to mutate systematically so they can grow up in as little as six weeks. All american companies use these mutated “broiler chicken” and doing that is also perfectly legal.

          • Boris

            I think you will find the mutations done by selective breeding have been going on for probably longer than just a few years. Laws have been tighten but more could be done about it. Sales of ‘organic’ and/or ‘free range’ has improved (at least I can say that much for some EU countries). I think in France it is up to 33%. Also, considering that this practise has been used for a very long period of time and people only in the last few years have come to know about it, it has had an effect on people changing the way they eat.

            What we are seeing though is this – people use this to deflect the abuse of the dogs in the Yulin Dog Meat Festival. Now, if you have a problem with broiler chicken that is great. Do not use that as a way to defend how other people mistreat animals.

            Personally, I don’t care if you eat dogs or cats or any other animals as long as it doesn’t spread diseases or when you do kill it, it isn’t tortured (whether by the way it is lived or killed).

          • 白色纯棉小裤裤

            I do feel sympathetic to the chicken however it is not enough for me to stop eating them because the ‘free range’ ones are too expensive.
            My point is, as long as we eat non-organic meat, we are contributing to the suffering of animals, so it is hypocrite to condemn people who do the same thing.

    • 白色纯棉小裤裤

      I suspect the suffering of the dogs is even comparable to the suffering of the animals in animal farms. Billions of animals are either raised in a small cage for their whole life or crowed in a tiny area and live in their own waste.They are fed with antibiotics and other drugs, forced to grow unnaturally and get mature within weeks. If you let me choose between the two I would rather be a dog that was tortured to death.
      IMO if you eat meat you are not justified to criticize killing dogs in anyway. Unless you eat organic meat only.

      • KamikaziPilot

        From what I hear at least some of the dogs are burned to death or skinned alive, which is totally unnecessary and cruel. Then again as you said living in cramped, unsanitary quarters and then slaughtered isn’t exactly a good life either. I do think public perception is that while the commercial mass slaughter of animals like chickens and cattle is indeed gory and painful for the animal, the way the Chinese kill dogs is even worse. I also think certain cultures that value dogs as pets are even more horrified at the treatment of dogs for human consumption in China purely because they are dogs and not animals like cattle or chicken. My opinions is basically kill the animals you’re going to eat as painlessly and quickly as possible, and don’t criticize others for eating dog if you also eat meat.

        • mr.wiener

          In the future this may all become moot as we will be printing out meat in labs…rather than eating labs.

          • bujiebuke

            They seem to be on the right trajectory when it comes to cost, but replicating taste will be more challenging

          • But what if you create lab meat in the lab? What if that slab of lab is too drab? Will buy crab from a scab and hope that it’s fab?

            I’m sorry … I’ll show myself out.

          • Vance

            As long as they don’t use ground dog meat as the stock material.

        • 白色纯棉小裤裤

          IMO being skinned alive is just as scary as forced to live in a small cage for one’s whole life, forced to mutate and then slaughered. However the former happens in the scale of hundreds while the latter happens in the scale of billions. I do agree with your opinion but I just want to add that if you are torturing animals for your convenience then you are not really better than people who torture animal for their enjoyment.

      • Jahar

        Chicken farms are beyond horrible.

    • bujiebuke

      The popular argument against eating dogs, cats, or dolphins is that they’re intelligent animals – cows are stupid so it’s OK to eat them. This line of thinking completely falls apart when you consider that pigs are more intelligent than dogs, yet few people object to eating bacon.

      The other argument, which you alluded to, is a bit more credible – dogs are slaughtered inhumanely in China. I think if protestors focus on this aspect alone, they might change the hearts and minds of some people from attending this festival.

      *Don’t judge my argument based on my avatar pic…

      • Edward Kay

        Many animals have been domesticated, yet dogs and cats remain on top of the list. Perhaps pigs are not as flexible or versatile in other aspects as compared to being on a platter.

        • tomoe723

          Just because pigs aren’t domesticated as much doesn’t mean they aren’t as flexible or versatile as you say. I had a pet pig and a pet chicken when I was little, and they’re as docile as dogs or cats can be. Of course, I cried a lot when one day my folks decided to roast them for dinner (on two separate occasions), and I strongly refused to eat my own pet’s meat.

          • Edward Kay

            In general darling. I’ve read a pig got help for its mistress when she had a stroke. Dogs are used for rescue, support for the blind, etc. The chicken won’t nuzzle you when you’re blue. As for the swine, be careful around that one.

          • KamikaziPilot

            But the dogs eaten in China aren’t raised as pets, they raised to be eaten. Again if you eat meat and criticize others for doing the same you have no credibility at all. Also a chicken won’t tear you to pieces like some dogs do.

          • Edward Kay

            When did I criticize another? But if meat can’t be categorized differently, then Cannibals doing it should be okay. Planet of the Apes keeping humans as livestock.
            Perhaps the word I’m looking for is gratitude. Cows and horses were also that until we developed tractors.

          • KamikaziPilot

            When you mentioned cats and dogs being at the top of the list of domesticated animals I interpreted it as hinting that cats and dogs shouldn’t be eaten because they were at the “top of the list” of domesticated animals. My mistake if I interpreted wrongly. Well a line has to be drawn somewhere and I would draw that line at eating humans. But do you agree that it’s okay to eat any animals as long as they aren’t made to suffer unnecessarily or endangered?

          • Edward Kay

            Not exactly wrong. Dogs have a special place for me but I don’t criticize others who have a different opinion. Which is why we debate and see if we can “win” the other over. Even if I stop eating chicken, my dog won’t. So sorry, chicken has to die, for now until they’ve perfected artificial meat.

          • tomoe723

            Yeah in general, but I still can’t rule them out being less intelligent. Chickens maybe, they’re not so smart, although they run pretty fast and a lot harder to catch…, but again, pigs are as docile as dogs can be. Just not the general practice like you said.

        • bujiebuke

          You’re right that pigs are not usually considered service animals, as far as I know. But it doesn’t mean that they’re less intelligent.

          If you’re arguing solely on the premise that service animals should not be eaten, then I’d point to the horse slaughter houses in Europe that sell the meat for human consumption. In the U.S., the last horse slaughter house was shut down, which has led to abandonment and starvation, an act much crueler than slaughtering and eating them.

  • KamikaziPilot

    “Same here in the West, but I try not to eat meat where I’m not sure the animal was treated right or not”

    Good luck with that. Unless you raise your animals yourself you can’t even be close to sure that the animals were treated humanely. Even terms such as “free range” when referring to chickens don’t mean much.

  • Dave

    Here’s my issue with eating dog meat: While other animals throughout history, such as cows, sheep, pigs, chickens, etc – have been bred and basically modified to produce more meat, be docile, produce more milk and the like, dogs were bred to be companion animals. They were bred to be “man’s best friend” and were used for many different tasks, such as guard duty, hunting, protection, sheepherding… as well as just being a companion. Therefore, the notion of eating a dog, to me, is in some violation of a core bond and instinct that we’ve developed with these animals over a long period of time throughout human history, as we as a species MADE them to be companion animals, not food stock.

    • mr.wiener
      • Dave

        Sure, poi dogs in hawaii – extinct, but an example of dogs specifically raised for food. I’ve seen trucks in China loaded with dogs, and I can say with 100% certainty that golden retrievers and poodles are not food stock animals. I’ve seen a man skinning a golden in Shanghai.

        • mr.wiener

          I don’t doubt it. The dog meat industry in China is rife with criminals and lowlifes, and for this reason prefers to target strays,the left overs from pet puppy mills and peoples pets. The consumption of dog meat in general is on decline so it is unlikely that anyone will go to the trouble or expense of breeding a strain specifically for consumption.
          Were this to happen would this seriously be your only objection to “fragrant meat”?

          • Dave

            Well, for me personally, I still wouldn’t eat it. Way too long of a history of breeding specific traits into dogs – as I said in another post, canines are not a naturally occurring species, they were “engineered” by humans, and not for the same reasons that cattle and other livestock were. If people want to eat dog, that’s their own business, I personally just won’t do it. I am however, hugely opposed to the treatment of the animals, where they get ritually tortured and beaten to make them “tastier”. That’s just appalling.

          • mr.wiener

            You and me both sir.

    • bujiebuke

      They were bred to be “man’s best friend” and were used for many different tasks, such as guard duty, hunting, protection, sheepherding… as well as just being a companion. Therefore, the notion of eating a dog, to me, is in some violation of a core bond…

      Yes they were bred for those things, but they were and still are bred to be eaten. The Gauls, Germans, and Eastern Europe have all consumed dog at some point in time.

      In the process of breeding dogs for those areas of specialization, what do you think happened to the pups who didn’t live up to snuff? Do you think the breeders just set them free to a farm with lots of running space out of the goodness of their heart?

      • Dave

        Yes, I am well aware of the history behind this. I just personally won’t eat dog. Thousands of years (graves have been found dating back 19,000 years) of breeding so specific traits emerged – dogs vocalize and express themselves in a way that effects humans on a much different level than say a pig – the way they posture themselves, even make eye contact – they know instinctively how to interact with humans (even “food” dogs) – Canines are NOT a naturally occurring species. People INVENTED and DESIGNED them based on wolves with desirable traits, and thousands of years of behavior is not going to be bred out of them because people think they have magic health benefits for eating them.

        I am also aware that millions of dogs are euthanized every year, even in the USA, but they are not beaten beforehand to make them “tastier”. Maybe can kill 2 birds with one stone and send the euthanized dogs to Asia – they just get put into landfills anyway.

        This is MY personal opinion as to why I won’t eat dog. If other people want to, that’s their own business, but it doesn’t change the fact that I personally find the concept distasteful. I also think rhino horn and tiger penis are taboo, but what’s the difference right? Except those are almost extinct so people can get boners.

        • bujiebuke

          I understand that you were expressing your opinion but I have an issue with your argument that “the notion of eating a dog, to me, is in some violation of a core bond” is irrational.

          What exactly is this “core bond” that you’re referring to and what happens to the people that violate them? If this “core bond” is so “instinctual”, as you put it, why do you suppose it gets violated throughout human history across multiple ethnic strata?

          As you have pointed out, dogs have been domesticated for different purposes, why can’t you accept that one of them is for food?

          • Dave

            Dogs have been companions to humans for somewhere around 18,800–32,100 years. Before humans had agriculture, dogs were being domesticated to help with hunting/gathering. So we’re talking about tens of thousands of years of genetic manipulation to bring out traits such as docility, intelligence, loyalty, physical characteristics, etc. Basically, we formed an “alliance” with these animals early in our history which COMPLETELY changed the course of human evolution, in stages of human psychology, hunting practices, territoriality, and social behavior Even today, the most prolific inter-species bonding is guess what? Between dogs and humans. Dog packs and human societies are closely related, and even our ancestors could see that. Nowhere else in the animal kingdom is this as apparent and this is why the original partnerships were formed. Why didn’t they domesticate our closest relative, the chimpanzee? Fundamental differences – they would not have functioned well. The wolves/dogs pack mentality fit perfectly into human culture and society. So, this core bond I speak of is the symbiotic relationship humans and dogs have had for tens of thousands of years, which again, fundamentally changed our culture and society. Cattle, for example, was domesticated and traits selected based on meat production and specifically for food, since they were first herded by humans.

            There have been times throughout history where people have eaten dog, but many of these cases are in times of hardship – it wasn’t a “preferred” source of meat in many cultures. In WW1 when food was scarce in Germany, people ate dogs and horses – called it “siege mutton”, but it’s not like they had farms specifically for this purpose.

            DNA evidence suggests that dogs were first domesticated in the European region, which I believe is why there is a special affinity for these animals from cultures originating from those regions (and more taboo to eat them) whereas they were introduced into other regions, such as Asia, where people didn’t “see them in the same light” perhaps.

            Basically, we as a species designed these animals to be companions and family members, to work with us, help us, and develop a symbiotic relationship. Turning around and deciding to eat them because of “magical powers” to me is just weird. An animal specifically bred and designed to be our companion used as a food source… Really, it just is so odd to me.

            I can accept that people keep them for food, I just don’t personally agree with the practice. I could understand it more if it was a region where it was one of the only food sources available, but in most places where dog is commonly eaten, it’s not, and people eat them for magic powers or BS traditional medicine.

            Look, in closing, if there are specific farms for the sole purpose of breeding dogs for food, such as in Korea, I have less of an issue with it, although I’m personally still not going to eat it, nor do I agree with the idea of eating dog. I do however, have a HUGE problem with people kidnapping pets and selling them on black markets, which is where a lot of these dogs come from.

          • bujiebuke

            So, this core bond I speak of is the symbiotic relationship humans and dogs have had for tens of thousands of years, which again, fundamentally changed our culture and society.

            and also,

            Nowhere else in the animal kingdom is this as apparent and this is why the original partnerships were formed.

            You can find much older examples of symbiosis from the most “primative” domain of life to the most complex. One example of absolute mutualism is that humans cannot live without gut bacteria in their intestines. These bacteria in turn benefit from the host by using nutrients not absorbed by the host. If we physically separate the two, both organisms would die.

            On the other hand…

            While I can understand the emotional bond between a dog and an individual person, it is not one that’s necessary for survival. Dogs and humans have certainly coevolved to a certain degree, but If we separate humans from dogs, both species can survive on their own.

            A better case of symbiosis would actually be between humans and cows. Humans depend on cows for sustenance while cows depend on humans for shelter and care. If we separate the two, humans can survive while cows would go extinct as they have been domesticated to the point of complete dependence.

            Two organisms that are symbiotic with one another does not preclude them from eating each other. Take the relationship between the clown fish and sea anemone, both organisms benefit from one another, but occasionally the sea anemone will ingest their inhabitants.

            TL;DR: while humans and dogs have indeed coevolved to a certain point, they’re dependency on one another is not absolutely necessary. There are numerous examples of symbiotic relationships in nature that do not preclude them from eating each other.

          • Dave

            Yes, fair point. Still not going to eat a dog though ;)

          • bujiebuke

            For myself, I don’t think I’d eat it even if there was some sort of “cruelty free” version.

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