Taiwanese Visitor Replaces Lost Travel Document Within a Day

Taibaozheng.

From NetEase:

Taiwanese Artist Loses Travel Documents in Wuhan for Returning to Taiwan, Replacement Only Took 1 Day

Wuhan Evening News report — A Taiwanese artist came to Wuhan for an exchange, accidentally lost his travel document for returning to Taiwan, but has to go back the next day, so what does he do? After receiving his request for help, the city Public Security Bureau’s Entry-Exit Administration opened the “green channel”, and replaced the document the same day.

Yesterday morning, the Hubei Masses Art Centre’s Ms. Liu requested help from the Entry-Exit Administration: The Mr. Chen Jinjin whom they invited to participate in their “China Hubei Juqin Art Exchange Event” had accidentally lost all of his documents, had to return to Taiwan today, and thus needed expedited documents replacement.

The civil police quickly fired up the holiday “green channel” for document processing, called multiple personnel in for the processing, processed all of the examination and approval procedures as quickly as possible, simultaneously notified the provincial Entry-Exit Administration, manufactured and issued his travel document for returning to Taiwan on the same day.

Police say, according to the Wuhan Municipal Public Security Bureau’s recently launched measures, city residents who have encountered an emergency and need to exit the country (borders) can go to the “green channel” window at the civic center Entry-Exit Administration, or apply by calling 027-85395370 on holidays and non-working days.

Comments from NetEase:

天一的天天下第一的一 [网易陕西省西安市网友]:

Sigh, instead of being ashamed of this, they are instead proud.

网易江西省新余市网友 ip:218.87.*.* (responding to above)

Which is why if it really does come to war, those who would lead the way [for the enemy] will also definitely be them.

水是冰的泪ZY [网易湖南省邵阳市网友]:

What a joke, just getting a national ID card takes at least a month, so may I ask our government officials, can you treat everyone equally?

济宁张贱人快还我五年利息 [网易江苏省徐州市网友]:

Try replacing a national ID card or having your name changed on your national ID card!

英雄绝对本色 [网易江苏省网友]:

Actually, it’s frankly something that can easily be done in a day, but the prerequisite is that you are something from anywhere but the People’s Republic of China.

zdq5959 [网易浙江省嘉兴市网友]:

So who are the underclass [people who willingly suffer mistreatment]? Just hold back your tears and admit it!

xiamu2014 [网易广东省深圳市网友]:

In Shenzhen, getting a temporary residence permit takes half a month, and there’s a risk if you go out during this time, as authorities are checking people everywhere in Shenzhen these days, with those who have their ID but no residence permit being taken in and locked up for a night. If you don’t believe me, go to the Shenzhen Public Security District Fuyongxiashiwei District, next to the Home Inn. There’s a police car parked there every day, with several motorcycles behind it. The people working her, talk about pitiful people having something detestable about them, they are all temporary workers. If you get in the car without a police officer telling you, did you commit a crime or murder someone? I’ve been checked a few times, and I have all my documents, but I simply refuse to show them. The moment they ask, I call 110 and tell these temporary workers that I’ll wait for a police officer to handle this. The moment the police officer comes, they just look over my ID and that’s it. It’s just those temporary workers, using their connection with the police to intimidate/bully people around.

无名呆瓜 [网易广东省珠海市网友]:

Good! I support this! Awesome! There’s hope after all!

我爱吃大黄瓜 [网易广西桂林市网友]:

Let me tell you a secret, every since QVOD has disappeared, I’ve been going to Lurouwu, it’s great, I’ve used up all my tissues.

弗洛伊德八世 [网易湖北省荆州市网友]:

People who are shameless are invincible, but when a government is shameless, then doom is near.

congfeng5210 [网易辽宁省沈阳市手机网友]:

Wuhan is interesting. The Japanese person who lost his bike was this place too, right?

陕西网友111 [网易广东省手机网友]:

They were also very quick with helping the Imperial [Japanese] Army find his bicycle. Wuhan sure is magical/strange.

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  • ptptp

    Perhaps, after seeing such kindness afforded them, the people of Taiwan will grant the mainland its independence.

    • Jace

      Wait, what? Taiwan is going to grant mainland its independance?

      • Alex Dương

        It’s a joke. For political reasons, officially the Republic of China still claims the mainland (plus Hong Kong and Macau).

        • TheInconvenientRuth

          Maybe we can have a referendum about this, like Scotland….

  • Kai

    I like how they call it “返台证件”, as if it is needed on the Taiwanese side to get back into Taiwan.

    P.S. – Okay, to be fair (and strictly linguistic), it’s needed in China to get your boarding pass from the ticketing counter, get out of Chinese customs, and thus “back” to Taiwan.

    • lacompacida

      It’s more like “Leaving China Document”, or Exit Visa.

  • AbC

    I don’t think being Taiwanese has anything to do with it… As long as you have the right connections, anything goes in China.

    The person requesting the special treatment ‘Ms Liu’ is probably the key here.

    • If I May

      I generally agree, but connections aren’t always necessary. For example, in the past, my wife has needed documentation expedited for our trips abroad. We have no connections to speak of, yet she has managed to get such things done in a matter of one or two days, and once or twice, in just hours, and without me having to accompany her. Her strategy is to be very polite, yet firm. China sucks, but not always.

  • Rick in China

    It’s funny to watch people freak out over expedited travel documents for foreigners – it’s something that happens most everywhere, if you provide proof of travel or other proof of emergency. Countries kind of have to do this.

    I also enjoy seeing Chinese call other countries “imperialist” – especially Japan, who hasn’t matched the description whatsoever since WW2. If anything, China is imperialist – according to the definition, and has been in all areas that they consider to be ‘rebellious’ in some way…Tibet, Xinjiang, HK…utilizing force to subjugate, try to migrate in their people to drown out the domestic occupants, etc.

    • SongYii
      • Rick in China

        It’s a good little piece, it would be more interesting if they elaborated further and provided more historical details than the obvious one..but a good simple reference for those who defend the obvious Imperialist China assertion.

        • SongYii

          I don’t think Quora is known for its comprehensiveness. Anyway, most questions on there are from people who know next to nothing about what they are asking. Today I saw a question from a guy claiming to be 25 years old and wanting to know how to mitigate the sleeplessness, fatigue, and malaise he’d been feeling since he discovered masturbation 2 years ago.

          • Rick in China

            Yeah – just looked at it. I haven’t read much Quora, but looks interesting enough to check out further…

        • Alex Dương

          Chinese claims to Tibet and Xinjiang originate from Imperial China, specifically the Qing Empire. That is a fact. Whether modern-day claims to Tibet and Xinjiang reflect modern-day imperialism is something that you and I disagree on.

          Even so, I’m surprised that no one in that Quora discussion mentioned Vietnam. It is arguably the most obvious instance of historical Chinese imperialism, as the Chinese sought to rule it as a province for over 1,000 years on four different occasions.

          • Rick in China

            Oh Alex.

            “Imperialism, as it is defined by the Oxford Dictionaries, is a policy of extending a country’s power and influence through colonization, use of military force, or other means.” Lewis Samuel Feuer identifies two major subtypes of imperialism; the first is the “regressive imperialism” identified with pure conquest, unequivocal exploitation, extermination or reductions of undesired peoples, and settlement of desired peoples into those territories. The second type identified by Feuer is “progressive imperialism” that is founded upon a cosmopolitan view of humanity, that promotes the spread of civilization to allegedly backward societies to elevate living standards and culture in conquered territories, and allowance of a conquered people to assimilate into the imperial society, an example being the British Empire which claimed to give their “citizens” a number of advantages.”

            Points:
            * Tibet was its own empire and civilization a thousand years before Qing control/claim.

            * Qing conquering and overtaking them doesn’t negate the fact that they regained their independence when Qing fell apart at the seams. They were then *RE-Conquered by the Imperialist PRC half a century later, with the words, essentially, “subjugation or death”.

            * “It is the traditional homeland of the Tibetan people as well as some other ethnic groups such as Monpas, Qiang, and Lhobas, and is now also inhabited by considerable numbers of Han and Hui people.”

            * Battle of Chamdo

            ** The last few points strongly imply “pure conquest, unequivocal exploitation, extermination or reductions of undesired peoples, and settlement of desired peoples into those territories.”

          • Alex Dương

            * Tibet was its own empire and civilization a thousand years before Qing control/claim.

            OK, thanks for playing the irredentist card. I called you out on this last time, and you got petulant and insisted that I straw manned you. Now we have you, using your own words, arguing that Chinese claims to Tibet are imperialist because Tibet was independent from China during the 7th and 9th Centuries AD.

            Well, Rick, if you want to play that card, then Beijing can play its (IMO shitty) card that Chinese claims to Tibet originate from the Yuan Empire. Beijing can even say that its claims to Xinjiang originate from the Tang Dynasty, which was concurrent with the Tibetan Empire. You can certainly rebut this, but not without contradicting yourself, as the only way to rebut it would be to drop claims based on irredentism.

            Which you appear to do next…

            * Qing conquering and overtaking them doesn’t negate the fact that they regained their independence when Qing fell apart at the seams. They were then *RE-Conquered by the Imperialist PRC half a century later, with the words, essentially, “subjugation or death”.

            When the Qing Empire collapsed, it wasn’t just the border regions that China lost control over. Until the end of the Northern Expedition, the Chinese central government had effective control over Beijing and not much else; China existed as a unified state only on paper. In actuality, it was divided across numerous cliques. Under CKS and the KMT, all cliques either pledged at least nominal allegiance to the KMT or were forced into accepting allegiance to the KMT.

            But this ignores the crucial fact that in 1914, the Tibetans signed an agreement holding that Tibet was NOT independent from China but rather a vassal state under Chinese suzerainty. The Chinese never accepted this view and continued to claim Tibet. Complicating matters further is the even more uncomfortable fact that the 9th Panchen Lama actually supported the KMT and ROC claims to Tibet.

            As I said, of course Chinese claims to Tibet originate from Chinese imperialism; the modern-day claim began in 1725 during the Qing Empire. But the modern-day claim is based on historic imperialism, not modern imperialism. You can roll your eyes all you want, but if you want to argue that Chinese claims to Tibet are invalid because Tibet was independent between the 7th and 9th Centuries AD, please renounce your Canadian citizenship.

    • Lambert

      I don’t think imperialist should be taken in a rigidly literal fashion in this case. It’s kind of like calling UK ‘the rotten country’ when the word in Chinese is not really derogatory. The corresponding Chinese word , Huang Jun, is often used in a humorous way.

  • lacompacida

    From the comments, I see a money making scheme here. When moving into a new town/city/whatever, there is a lag between arrival, and therefore start of living in, and obtaining the residence card. It is also illegal not to have a temporary residence card if you live in a city/town/whatever. And there is a fine if you get caught. How about parking a police car in front of the office issuing those temporary residence card and arrest everyone entering it. Everyone entering is guaranteed not to have a card, and are therefore can be arrested and fined. And when these people were released, they will go to the office prompto, and get arrested again. This is an endless money making opportunity.

    • Ken Morgan

      You are describing Azerbaijan.It is perhaps one of the most corrupt places I’ve ever been to, police even local people are corrupt. It is the one place I would never travel to again and would recommend nobody to go there either. I travelled through there a few years ago. To get across the border you need to pay a bribe. No bribe and it takes 24 hours to cross the border, they will just stand around and try to out wait you.

      After the border there are check points every 2km, which demand to see your passport. They grab your passport and demand $100US to get it back. Every single road entering a town has a similar check point, every single road on the way OUT of town is also covered by similar check points. When you do stop one guy grabs your passport the others ‘search’ your bags and pocket things

      I was however riding an off road motorbike and rode about 200m away from the main road avoiding most of the check points. Even petrol stations were corrupt, the sign said .20 Manat for a litre of petrol. The owner would say no sign is wrong and it was 20 Manat per litre of petrol.

      You stopped anywhere and kiddies would cut things off your bike and steal them.

      The 490km to Baku from Georgia was a long hard slog, even in the hotels in Baku you’d pay, then a different person would come asking for payment. You’d pay them and another person would ask for payment.

      It is the one country in the world which is ABSOLUTELY IRREDEEMABLE in my eyes. North Korea, Kinshasa, Brazzaville, Colombia etc look nice compared to Azerbaijan.

      • Alex Dương

        Have you ever been to Transnistria?

        • Ken Morgan

          Until you made that comment I had never heard of this place.

          • Alex Dương

            It’s a semi-recognized state that’s on paper still officially a part of Moldova. It’s supposedly the most corrupt country on Earth.

  • If I May

    I don’t get it… Why is an instance of expedited documents “news”? This stuff happens everywhere all over the place, including China (and by no means just for waiguoren). I guess that the only thing interesting about this CS entry is the bizarrely negative and bitter attitude of some of the local commentators.

    BTW, and completely off-topic… Lately, CS pages are sometimes chewing up CPU’s while using Chrome. Right now, this tab is using anywhere from 15 to 30 percent of it, while the other CS tab is using 10 to 20. I can barely type with all the lag that this is causing. I thought that you guys should be aware of that.

    • Alex Dương

      chinaSMACK translates what is popular and trending. That could be but need not be news.

      • If I May

        I’ve been aware of that for five or six years, but thanks for the heads up. Why is this piece trending/popular?

        • Alex Dương

          If you were aware of that, then you should know that not all articles are necessarily news. As to why this is trending and popular, how does anything start to trend?

          • If I May

            I’m sorry that I stepped on your toes again by commenting. I didn’t mean to annoy you. I apologize all over the place.

          • Alex Dương

            Sarcasm aside, if you “knew” this for five years, you shouldn’t have to ask why this is “news.”

          • If I May

            Dude… What’s you problem? Why do you have to be so freakin’ rude all the time toward so many posters? You’re a mod, for crying out loud. Are you trying to push people out? And over totally trivial shit… Lay off.

          • Alex Dương

            You remind me of a guy I encountered in Guangzhou the last time I traveled to China to visit my grandparents. I was running to board a train, and the guy next to me was also running and bumping me quite aggressively. I bumped him back, and he scowled at me.

            If you don’t like getting bumped, don’t bump others. Pretty simple.

          • If I May

            I thanked you… and then asked a genuine question. Your response was that on a whinny little… Why? I don’t know. What I do know now, with certainty, is that you have a really bad attitude. Fine. From now on, if you post anything regarding something that I express on this site, I’ll completely ignore it by scrolling past it and focus on the good posts by others.

          • Alex Dương

            Sarcasm is hard to detect in writing unless you really lay it thick, but when you precede a thank you by saying that you’ve already known about it for five or six years, said thank you is obviously sarcastic. As for your question, I answered it.

            Like I said, if you don’t like getting bumped, don’t bump others. What you’re doing is bumping me and then acting indignantly when I bump you back.

          • If I May

            Obvious to you… At best, the way that I wrote that might lead to some uncertainty of interpretation with some readers, but “obvious”? Nah. That’s just over-sensitive, insecure nonsense. Also, I’ve been reading CS since 2008 or 2009, and have posted on and off under two or three retired user names since. If you have trouble believing that, then I don’t know what to say, except that such a disbelief is irrational. Anyway, that’s it. It appears that I have less time on my hands than you and I’d rather use that time well. It’s been interesting reading your posts directed at me lately, but I won’t be reading any more of those in the future. I prefer positive communication and simply to have fun online. Cheerio.

          • Alex Dương

            It appears that I have less time on my hands than you and I’d rather use that time well.

            By writing long wall-of-text paragraphs? Up to you.

          • C Mac

            No, you, may not…..
            and now you can walk down the highway of humiliation

            Come on, x5 years and you still dont understand the Smack?

            You gotta go to baidu or one of the other major Chinese news portals and you will see trending videos and news.
            That is where they get these stories.

            Song of the Article

            You aint seen nothing yet
            -Bachman Turner Overdrive

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XZWgHNcUeA

            now and always
            wumaodang

          • mr.wiener

            Comrade Kedafu. Long time no post mate. Too cool for fools.

          • Don’t Believe the Hype

            try toning down the passive aggressive, complacent attitude. Getting sore over such a little thing is pretty pathetic bro

          • If I May

            BTW, as per your “suggestion” a few days ago, I copied this thread, just in case you decide to alter it like you did then. :-)

          • ShanPao

            Jesus wept, how did you get to be a mod? Is fauna aware of your incessant rudeness to people on here? Your job is not to dissuade people from commenting or visiting this website. I too have been using this website since 2009 and I ask the same question “why is this news?” Note, the question is not why does ChinaSMACK translate this, but how did this get popular in the first place… its an open question, as in, WTF?

          • Alex Dương

            It’s funny that you bring up Jesus because being a mod does not mean that I have to follow Luke 6:29. If you treat me with snark and sarcasm, hmm, don’t get uptight if it comes right back at you. If I May has a tendency to be combative with me and then claim that I am being combative when I treat him the way he treats me. The golden rule is pretty sensible and not unreasonable at all.

            And I answered the question. Notice how then and now, I referred to a link?

          • mr.wiener

            Alex is opinionated ,but he has the annoying habit of usually being spot on in terms of facts and figures. Politeness is a personal choice , but given that “If he May” is not short of the snark himself why should this bother him?
            My personal understand of the mod’s job apart from weeding out the obvious trolls is to ensure that CS doesn’t turn into a circle jerk for China bashers or a midden for han chauvinists….so that ideas and opinions can be chewed over with the minimum of friction…Though with some stories it is more like cleaning the skid marks off of the inside of a toilets bowl.
            Hab a naice dae.

          • Rick in China

            I don’t think that the OP meets any of the criteria by the post being: obviously trolling, circle jerking/china bashing, or chauvinistic.. it’s more-so the expression that this is a stupid post, questioning how it could have ever become popular, and questioning why it seemed like a good choice to translate (does every trending topic get a post? Maybe..but it doesn’t invalidate the question imo).

            That expression, should it be shared, as the readership of the site, does more to *help improve* it than to diminish it as would any of the mod-able (by your criteria) type posts.

          • Kai

            mr.wiener isn’t saying the OP is “obviously trolling, circle jerking/china bashing, or chauvinistic”. He said that’s what he understands as being a mod’s job to weed out.

            Alex only responded with some consternation when he interpreted If I May as being rudely sarcastic in his response. If I May then continued to be rudely sarcastic.

            If I May asked a question that has been repeatedly and consistently answered on cS since its inception, and one that is more than adequately AND pre-emptively covered in the About and FAQ pages.

            Asking “why is this popular” is a legit question. In fact, it is a GREAT question, and something that I think will invite people to share their own insights and thus lead to possibly interesting discussion about each cS post.

            “Why is this news” is reasonably interpreted as asking why is something being translated if it isn’t news. It’s asking a question that is already answered and should already be known by someone who self-represents as already knowing the answer and having been on cS for a long time. Even so, Alex’s immediate response was a neutral answer to If I May. Alex wasn’t being rude. His interpretation of If I May’s question wasn’t unreasonable either.

            The expression “why is this news” is almost always expressed NOT as a genuine question but as a judgment of how interesting the translated article is to that commenter. It is almost always an expression of subjective opinion than a genuine question. It doesn’t improve this site because cS is very adamant about not pandering to what its readers’ subjectively find interesting and trying its best to focus on translating what Chinese netizens made trending as a reflection of their interests.

            If people want to help improve this site, then ask genuine questions in more accurate terms, such as “why is this popular/trending”?

          • Rick in China

            “If people want to help improve this site, then ask genuine questions in more accurate terms, such as “why is this popular/trending”?”

            He did, in a subsequent post. However, in the original post – I think that it can be interpreted as “why is this news to the Chinese who are freaking out about this, and making it a trending topic?” — since it’s nothing new. I’ve had expedited document service in China long ago, so while the ‘Green Channel’ may be a new introduction, expedited emergency service is nothing new…..so “why is this news” and “why is this trending”, in this context, are almost the same question.

            He mentioned CS in this context: “I guess that the only thing interesting about this CS entry is the bizarrely negative and bitter attitude of some of the local commentators.” which does not imply “why did CS even post this.”

            I don’t see why this is an invalid original post. He also mentioned a potential performance issue with the site, which also implies an intention to help improve the site itself through identifying issues.

          • Kai

            He did, in a subsequent post.

            Yes, I know, which is why I already answered his genuine question AND have separately demonstrated that I believe he asked one.

            However, in the original post – I think that it can be interpreted as “why is this news to the Chinese who are freaking out about this, and making it a trending topic?” — since it’s nothing new.

            Yeah, which I’ve said myself in the comment you’re responding to and separately elsewhere.

            so “why is this news” and “why is this trending”, in this context, are almost the same question.

            I don’t think it is unreasonable for Alex to have interpreted his original question as a question instead of a statement of opinion. I’d say that’s Alex giving him the benefit of the doubt and being sincere in asking a question instead of just complaining about something that doesn’t interest him.

            He mentioned CS in this context: “I guess that the only thing interesting about this CS entry is the bizarrely negative and bitter attitude of some of the local commentators.” which does not imply “why did CS even post this.”

            I’m not sure it doesn’t imply that or that it is unreasonable to interpret that as implying that. We have to ask what he means by “the only thing interesting about this CS entry”. Is he referring to “interesting” as he sees it or as cS sees it?

            I don’t see why this is an invalid original post.

            No one said his original post was invalid.

            He also mentioned a potential performance issue with the site, which also implies an intention to help improve the site itself through identifying issues.

            Yes, and I responded to that, mainly because only Thomas and I are in a position to do so.

            I wouldn’t conflate the possible intentions in his second paragraph with his first one though.

            The situation here is either:

            1. He asked a genuine question in his original post, got a neutral and relevant answer from Alex, then made a sarcastic retort, to which Alex made a retort in kind but still answered with relevance, before devolving into attacking Alex straight-up.

            2 He disingenously asked a question in his original post, got a neutral and relevant answer from Alex, then made a sarcastic retort but restating his question, to which Alex made a retort in kind but still answered with relevance, before devolving into attacking Alex straight-up and claiming he asked a genuine question.

            If #2, Alex still gave a genuine answer to his genuine question. In either case, There is no reading of how this conversation unfolded that makes Alex look like the aggressor here. The most you can blame him for is giving If I May the benefit of the doubt that he was asking a genuine question in his original post and providing a relevant, sincere answer.

          • SongYii

            He’s a total dick, dude. Rather often. Don’t take it personally, probably his life is not going as planned.

          • Rick in China

            CS doesn’t stand for Customer Service, so clearly the mod had to smack down the “why is this trending, it’s stupid” type comment that likely many people thought as soon as reading the title. It’s fair to smack it down, but I believe in doing so, it’s also necessary for the smack-er to accept the fact he’s being an ass in doing so and unable to handle the follow-up conversation that was obvious to come in a professional manner. :D

          • mr.wiener

            Dicks , pussies and assholes bro.

          • SongYii

            Two of those are m’favorites.

          • Kai

            I’m going to defend Alex here, because you have a history of rather rude, sarcastic comments on cS (on your multiple names), especially in response to others. As such, I don’t think Alex misread your inflection or misread it unfairly.

            It’s really hard to understand how someone could have been reading cS since 2008/9 and still be asking why something is “news”, not least of which because cS has been extremely consistent in how it has represented itself and its editorial mission ever since its first About page and every revision since. A new visitor might be forgiven for not immediately understanding that cS is not about “news”, but one that says he’s been here from the beginning? From when Fauna posted even less possibly “newsy” stuff?

            Come on, dude, be fair. You should at least recognize how the whole “but thanks for the heads up” remark could be interpreted as a rude, sarcastic retort to Alex quite neutrally answering your initial question, especially in light of your past comments. Your subsequent comments dripping with rude sarcasm also reinforce Alex’s initial read of your inflection. If you weren’t trying to be rude and sarcastic in the first place, you subsequently made it seem much more likely you were. I hope you can take a step back and recognize that.

        • Kai

          I think it was the (or one of) the more commented articles on NetEase at the time. As for why, part of the fun is trying to figure out why and often the reasons are as mundane as why certain things are popular/trending on some Western portal site: they just are, meaning for some reason, at that point in time, enough people took an interest or (in this case) enough people commented on it.

          Here’s the context I can give you: China is currently in a Golden Week and there’s less interenet activity in general. yesterday was Sunday, which also normally has less internet activity. The above article was highly commented at the time, but its metrics don’t make it amongst the most popular of NetEase stuff.

          My speculations about why this resonated with enough Chinese netizens: It hits on a sore spot that a lot of Chinese people have, that foreigners (including HKers and Taiwanese) are treated better than locals. Like Rick said, expedited processing in emergencies isn’t actually that unusual. There’s also a suggestion in the article itself that this isn’t a service limited to only Taiwanese people.

          But as you can see from the comments, people tend to run with their preconceptions and biases.They bring up how it takes forever for them to get other documents handled even when the comparison may not be equivalent and thus fair. They remember the Japanese guy who lost his bike but the Wuhan police quickly got it back, which was also a big story that many Chinese netizens remember. They respond irrationally, and the nature of their responses resonate with the irrational emotions of other netizens who then vote them up.

          Similar to how things unfold on cS as well.

          This is one of those stories that, in my opinion, are more interesting for the comments than the story itself, because they reflect sentiments popular among Chinese netizens and perhaps by extension the public. Moreover, is it just sentiments of inequality or is there also an issue of ignorance involved? Have they ever traveled abroad? Experienced an emergency loss of documents that needed to be replaced immediately? Is that why they find the idea of such documents being replaced within a day so strange for them?

          Those are just some example thought processes one can have after reading this that can lead to some interesting insights.

    • Kai

      I’ve experienced laggy input on cS pages before (not often but I have a few times throughout history) that a refresh usually solved. I’ve always reasoned it down to either a flash embed (like video embeds, including flash ads) or Disqus somehow acting up (its an embed as well) because I’ve experienced similar on other sites as well with similar symptoms and page elements. If you can identify anything else worth us investigating, please contact us and send us whatever leads you have.

  • Markus P

    Anyone know of a good free proxy to access websites that are blocked in China?
    I know i have asked before, but old ones stop working over time.
    Thanks.

    • David

      I only use a pay VPN, $60/year is not much. There is Pure VPN and Astril, I have used both and both give about the same level of service. Good.

    • SongYii

      I wrote a friendly and lengthy response, and Disqus didn’t post it. So I’ll summarize.

      Witopia is 70/year and great on computer, but very poor on mobile.

      Astril is 40/six months, but need additional packages to access Dropbox and other more sensitive stuff. Its unstable on computer, but works great on mobile.

      All the free ones I’ve used were garbage.

    • Probotector

      Freegate.

  • LuoyangLaowai

    I wonder how much extra you have to pay to get the “Green Channel” Service.

  • commander

    Though it is expected to have huge implications on ethnic minorities, Uighrs and Tibetans in China’s outer regions and Taiwan, Hong Kong protests calling for greater democracy falls out of the radar of chinaSMACK.

    The worldwide headline-grabbing demonstration came after Beijing announced that candidates for the Asian financial hub’s chief executive post is to be screened by a nomination committee, an announcement that Hong Kongers describe as a blatant infringement on their right to elect their leader and a grave breach of Bejing’s promise for autonomy upon the territory’s return to mainland China from Britain.

    But the failure to feature the unfolding demonstration in Hong Kong in a chinaSMACK post may be understandable given China’s heavy censorship on that issue, mindful of possible negative consequences like triggering political separatism.

    But the non-reference leaves an impression that chinaSMACK falls behind in dealing current affairs of great significance.

    • Kai

      cS isn’t about dealing in “current affairs of great significance” but in current affairs with demonstratable Chinese internet traction, whatever that is, whether it is of great significance or not. You know this and have known this for a long time, so you making this comment boils down to a disingenuous criticism of cS for not catering to what you personally find important and interesting. You are going into McDonald’s and pontificating on it falling behind culinary trends by not selling grilled ribeye basted in all-organic truffle butter, both made from grass-fed cows.

      • commander

        Don’t take offense over my comment.

        I just want to know reactions of Chinese people living in mainland China to the Hong Kong’s Occupy Central pro-democracy movement.

        And come to think of it, the aim of chinaSMACK is to share the most shared and commented articles online with visitors, and I forget that. I never intend to pick a fight with chinaSMACK operators.

        But there are two points to be considered in your reply.

        First, dismissing the latest development in Hong Kong as ” what you personally find important and interesting” is not an apt description.

        Although western media are trying to highlight what they see as a grave violation of democratic values, the mass protest, however you define it, is one of the most important issues without making any judgement.

        Second, I don’t know whether Chinese people in the continent are aware of or interested in what’s happening in Hong Kong, but I bet the unfiltered information flow into the continent about the Hong Kong demonstration would draw traction among Chinese netizens significantly enough for chinaSMACK to deal with it.

        Finally, I am a frequent chinaSMACK visitor, and enjoy posts here. Please, don’t get offended over my comment. :)

        • Kai

          I just want to know reactions of Chinese people living in mainland China to the Hong Kong’s Occupy Central pro-democracy movement.

          I know, many do.

          And come to think of it, the aim of chinaSMACK is to share the most shared and commented articles online with visitors, and I forget that. I never intend to pick a fight with chinaSMACK operators.

          Cool.

          First, dismissing the latest development in Hong Kong as ” what you personally find important and interesting” is not an apt description.

          First of all, I wasn’t trying to dismiss “the latest development in Hong Kong”. I personally am following that story.

          Second, I was juxtaposing what you want to see from cS versus what cS says it will try to deliver.

          I personally think HK is an important story, but I’m saying it doesn’t fall under cS’s purview for reasons you already know.

          Second, I don’t know whether Chinese people in the continent are aware of or interested in what’s happening in Hong Kong, but I bet the unfiltered information flow into the continent about the Hong Kong demonstration would draw traction among Chinese netizens significantly enough for chinaSMACK to deal with it.

          I can tell you for a fact that information does get into China and there ARE mainland Chinese netizens who care and have opinions about it. The problem is that there is no critical mass of discussion that cS can reference as reaching, influencing, or being consumed by mainstream netizens. We aim for mainstream sources, not the underground minority ones. There’s underground stuff for everything, but they’re far less reliable for revealing something about mainstream sentiment.

          What I can offer you is this:

          http://www.quora.com/search?q=what+do+mainland+chinese+think+about+hk+protests

          You might see some mainland netizens who have VPNs answering there.

          But until there is something on the mainland internet that has a critical mass of discussion, we don’t have an excuse. It doesn’t mean we personally think the story in HK isn’t important, it just reflects something poignant about th mainland Chinese internet.

          Finally, I am a frequent chinaSMACK visitor, and enjoy posts here. Please, don’t get offended over my comment. :)

          Thanks for the olive branch. Cheers.

          • commander

            Thanks for your prompt commentary! :)

    • Rick in China

      I think the fact that ChinaSMACK covers “current affairs with demonstratable Chinese internet traction” excluding Hong Kong (since this is all that is taking place in Hong Kong) is an implicit admission that Hong Kong is not China. Otherwise — wouldn’t “ChinaSMACK” also include trending topics or current affairs popular with Hong Kong at heart?

      • Kai

        Stuff that’s only popular (and accessible) with Hong Kong netizens is dissuaded for the same reason why Fauna was dissuaded from covering so much local Shanghai stuff as she did in the early years.

        There have been some attempts to give some coverage to stuff popular with TW/HK netizens (TW more because it’s a way larger netizen population), but all of it is constrained by what isn’t highly sensitive in mainland China where many of our contributors live and are nationals of.

        HK and TW may be part of “China” and the “Chinese internet”, but the implication was always with an emphasis on and from the perspective/lens of mainland Chinese netizen and the mainland Chinese internet that is censored, restricted, and arguably has its own culture.

  • Kai

    Links do not provide what I am looking for.

    You’re moving the goalposts. That link provides AN answer to If I May’s question. In fact, it provides multiple answers, which are all relevant, albeit to varying degrees, so you can’t say it is “irrelevant”.

    What you CAN say is that while it answers the question of why things may go viral, you’d like more speculation specific to this specific article.

    I don’t think anybody is literally asking for an explanation why this story became viral, just commenting.

    Right, that’s the usual case. In that case, Alex was still commenting on a comment, just like everyone else does.

    That said, If I May then said he asked a genuine question.

  • Kai

    What? You comments did not. You know who else self-congratulates their own arguments? whuddyasack.

  • Kai

    By “this mod”, are you referring to mr.wiener or Alex? It’s the middle of the night for Alex in his time zone. mr.wiener and I have lives too.

    Also, you have a Disqus account, so why are you complaining about your comments not being published when it is your own decision to post as a guest instead of under your Disqus account?

  • Confucius

    Being unhappy about special treatment for foreigners compared to the locals isn’t xenophobia. Rick in China sums it up well above: the problem is the commenting locals (not necessarily all or even most locals, since those ones wouldn’t be commenting) don’t realise foreigners everywhere around the world get expedited visas/passports etc

  • Alex Dương

    So what are you looking for? You complained yesterday that I did not answer the question. Now you are saying that I did answer it, but my answer is not relevant. I disagree. I think it provides a few answers to why anything starts to trend, since going viral is an extreme case of popularity / trending.

    And since you complained that I didn’t answer a question (which I actually did), I think you should answer my question as to what you’re looking for, especially since you also say

    I don’t think anybody is literally asking for an explanation why this story became viral, just commenting.

    which seems to suggest that you aren’t looking for anything. OK.

  • James C

    This is definitely a good thing and it is good to know that Taiwanese have such good benefits with the visa. However, I think it’s been like this for awhile.

  • steamknife

    I’m from Taiwan and I’ve seen COUNTLESS documents expedited for the mainland Chinese. Tell these people to go f!ck themselves.

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