Man Arrested After “Slandering” Chinese Police Online

A man was arrested and given 5 days of administrative detention for slandering the police anonymously on the internet in China.

From NetEase:

Yanzhou Traffic Police: Making an Online Post Denouncing the Police Should be Punished

Due to making an internet post criticizing traffic police for a ticket, 21-year-old Cao XX was given 5 days of administrative detention. The police microblog released this information to remind netizens to not say whatever they please anonymously on the internet, and that violations of the law must be punished. This microblog message aroused controversy.

@兖州公安, the official microblog account of the Shandong province Jining city Yanzhou county municipal public security bureau posted an message today: On May 4th, the Yanzhou Municipal Public Security Bureau Internet Security Squad gave 5 days of administrative detention in accordance with the law to a person who had illegally made a post on the internet insulting the traffic police.

According to the microblog of @兖州公安, Cao XX, male, 21 years old, from Yanzhou district Yandian town, at around 4pm on 2014 April 28, had illegally parked his car at Zhongyu Bridge North Road and was issued an “Illegal Parking Citation” by the traffic police squad.

Afterwards, Cao XX used the online nickname “兖州存哥” to make an internet post on the Baidu Yanzhou Tieba [Post Bar], “Fucking great, I just parked and already got a citation. The traffic police in Yanzhou are cowards.”

This act was very quickly discovered by the Yanzhou Public Security Bureau Internet Squad, who believed “Cao XX not only wasn’t repentant but also venting personal spite on the internet”, “publicly insulting the People’s police, causing a negative social influence.”

May 4th, the Internet Security Squad administratively detained Cao XX, with the @兖州公安 microblog account claiming that Cao XX has at present been administratively detained for five days.

The Yanzhou Public Security Bureau also reminded people that “the net of the law is vast and while it is loose, it will not allow [criminals] to escape, so don’t mistakenly believe that you can anonymously say whatever you want on the internet thinking it is no big deal, and instead believe that ‘if you don’t want people to know, the only way is to not do it’. If you violate the law, you will definitely suffer the law’s punishment.”

This microblog post aroused online controversy. Netizens criticized the police for being inhuman in their enforcement of the law, punishing people as they please and too harshly, and that this kind of law enforcement is indeed “cowardly”. This afternoon, @兖州公安 has already deleted the relevant microblog post. However, neither the Yanzhou Public Security Bureau nor the Internet Security Squad have made any further responses on the matter of the detained individual.

yanzhou-public-security-bureau-police-weibo-microblog-deleted-post

A representative for the Yanzhou Traffic Police Squad expressed during a media interview that Cao XX insulted the police in a public setting, that the police are representatives of the law, and thus this is behavior in contempt of the law and should be lawfully punished.

First of all, he believes Cao XX’s accusation is unreasonable: “Normally, when the driver is present, we won’t issue a citation, but instead tell him that he has parked in violation and have him move the car. Only when the driver is not present will we leave a ticket on the car parked in violation.” Because of this, he believes Cao XX very unlikely “just parked and already got a citation.”

He admits that the grumbling of car owners who have been punished for illegal parking is understandable. That’s why if they are yelled at face-to-face, traffic police will usually exercise patience. However, posting on Baidu Tieba [Post Bar] after the incident is considered a public situation, and of a malicious nature. “It isn’t just police, no one regardless of who they are should be cursed like this.”

In response to questions about the judgement [administrative detention] being law enforcement going too far, he stressed that the public security bureau always operates in a lawful manner these days [unlike perhaps in the past].

According to “Law on Public Security Administrative Punishments” regulations, those publicly insulting others or fabricating facts to slander others can be punished with no more than five days of detention or a fine of no more than five hundred yuan; for more severe incidents, one can be detained for five to ten days, in addition to a fine of no more than five hundred yuan. When it comes to insulting a member of the People’s police, there is Article 35 of the “People’s Police Law” which stipulates that the Public Security Administrative Punishments Law applies to publicly insulting a police officer in the course of his duties.

Source: Southern Metropolis Daily, the official microblog of the Yanzhou Public Security Bureau, etc.

Comments from NetEase (1 and 2):

撒旦也流泪 [网易湖北省襄阳市手机网友]:

A police officer can represent the country’s law? A police officer is a person. Can a person represent the country? Don’t you think the power you people [government] have given police officers is too much?

网易宁夏银川市手机网友 ip:61.243.*.*:

Who is in contempt of the law?

网易广东省深圳市手机网友 ip:183.49.*.*:

Police officers are the law?

网易辽宁省锦州市手机网友 ip:123.187.*.*:

You are the law? Talk about ridiculous.

网易黑龙江省哈尔滨市手机网友 ip:113.0.*.*:

I resolutely disagree with you people saying “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”, because how can something like “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” be so casually said? First of all, “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” is simply fabricated slander. Second, even if you believe “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”, you shouldn’t write “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” on the internet, because if you write “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” everywhere, everyone will actually believe “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”. Look at me, I don’t casually write online “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”.

网易江苏省南京市手机网友 ip:112.80.*.*:

Police cannot represent the law. Police must also operate in accordance with the law. If the police represent the law, then it would be rule by man, not rule of law! The popular saying goes that a police officer cannot say to the suspect while enforcing the law: I am the law!

网易加拿大手机网友 网易加拿大手机网友 ip:198.50.*.*:

Inscribed at the entrance to Germany’s Dachau Concentration Camp is the famous cautionary words of a 17th century poet: “When a regime begins burning books, if it is not stopped, its next step is to burn people! When a regime begins prohibiting speech, if it is not stopped, its next step is to kill people to prevent them from speaking!”
Edmund Burke once said: “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

坚持我的道德 [网易广东省深圳市手机网友]:

It seems like even if you feel this is an insult, you still have to first file a lawsuit [before someone can be punished].

网易江苏省连云港市手机网友 ip:114.237.*.*:

This goes too far, don’t you think? Does this count as abuse of power?

东土无净土 [网易江苏省无锡市手机网友]:

Administrative detention in accordance with the law? In accordance with what TM law?

de56000cbc326227f321290d [网易四川省宜宾市手机网友]:

I’ve seen government officials curse/insult people, but how come I’ve never seen anything happen to them?

网易浙江省绍兴市手机网友 ip:115.224.*.*:

Nowadays the law is about what a minority says, don’t you know?

我家没有水表电表也在外面 [网易新疆乌鲁木齐市手机网友]:

What can be said? If you don’t work hard, you’ll spend your entire life in the mainland.

网易江西省九江市手机网友 ip:59.54.*.*:

The FBI arrested someone who said Obama is “cowardly” online, and expressed: Obama is the President of the United States, the symbol of the country, so insulting him is insulting the country. The net of the law is vast and while it is loose, it will not allow [criminals] to escape, so don’t mistakenly believe that you can anonymously say whatever you want on the internet thinking it is no big deal!

Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • lonetrey / Dan

    Who do they think they are, Judge Dredd?

    • mr.wiener

      l love Judge Dredd, the comic, but the analagy is correct. In mega city one people can do as they please …unless they challenge the authority of the judges.
      ( I have a 10 year collection of 2000AD weeklies sealed in plastic and sitting in boxes back in my big brothers hay shed back in Oz)

      • Dr Sun

        i’ll give you linette for the entire collection

        • mr.wiener

          Is she sealed in plastic, in boxes in your brother’s hay shed?

          • Surfeit

            It can be arranged that way… *dum dum dummmm!*

          • Irvin

            I’m sure she’s not mint condition lol

          • firebert5

            You should make sure CGC grades her first.

          • Dr Sun

            I’ll have to plead the 5th on that :)

        • Germandude

          That would grant you a picture of @mrwiener:disqus smiling in front of his collection.
          On a good day…

    • Irvin

      Didn’t you know every chinese police is a Judge Dredd?

      • lonetrey / Dan

        “I AM THE LAW!”

        • Dr Sun

          oops, I apologize pics from another counties ” Judge Dredds”

    • Insomnicide

      Funny, you make that analogy. Magistrates in ancient China were political officials, prosecutors and court judge rolled into one….so I guess you could say they do think they’re Judge Dredd.

    • don mario

      welcome to chinar

  • Don’t Believe the Hype

    I don’t get the last comment, is he being sarcastic in some way?

    • Insomnicide

      It is sarcasm, however, the NSA did report and arrest some teenager over a joke made online about bombing…

      • David

        Yes but taking about a bomb is different than criticizing the president (criticizing the president is legal, depending on what and where you say something about a bomb it could be illegal or at the very least get you questioned).

        • Insomnicide

          Yeah I know, I’m just saying police arresting people over comments online aren’t new or unique. In the information age, surveillance has only increased, not decreased.

  • firebert5

    He should have stuck to pointing his laser pointer at buildings. Plenty of freedom here for that I hear.

    • Germandude

      While reading above article, I was thinking “This is calling for some laser pointer freedom mockery, but meh, I guess this joke’s validity date has passed”.

      Seeing that you already posted it: Congratulations! And thanks for keeping it alive!

      PS: What do you think of my new avatar?

      • firebert5

        Kind of reminds me of Rocksmith or Guitar Hero. (I’ve only ever played the former). And, yeah, the joke is overplayed. Sorry. Couldn’t help it.

        • Germandude

          No, I am (positively) surprised the joke is still running. Hence why I changed my avatar to some laser pointers.

  • linette lee

    China this is your gov’t system and laws? This is your regulation? Are you not going to punish the police for this? The China police are barbarians?

    • noodles76

      Punish the police for what? The police did not make the law…though they do interpret it as they see fit …or so it seems. Getting cheesed at the police may not be fair, they can only do what they are given the authority to do, so maybe look there for blame. Who gave the police this authority? Hmmm….

      • linette lee

        That’s true too. Both China gov’t the law maker and the one that enforce it are guilty. In the year 2014 you can’t express your opinion online about our gov’t we have a problem.

        I bet if I live in China I will get arrested the first day I arrived.

        • Surfeit

          A very calm and humble reply!

        • YourSupremeCommander

          Can I pay for your ticket? I just want you to know that I am the first of the many thousands who will be DELIGHTED to buy you that one way ticket.

          • Germandude

            Can we please wait with that until I am outta here? Don’t want her close-by.

          • Surfeit

            Playing hard to get?

          • Germandude

            I don’t understand your question?

          • Surfeit

            I don’t know. Do you?

          • Surfeit

            bu zhi daaaoooo

        • Zappa Frank

          and in the same time you support that very same government when try to expand and bully other countries.. and blame US, where you live and can criticize anyone you want, for trying to contain that government that makes life in china without any rights..

        • loki

          your not in China?> wow had no clue…

          • Zappa Frank

            apparently not only she is not, but according to what she said she’s never been in china, mainland china…

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        where do these so-called laws come from anyway, i’ve never once seen any specific reference to a specific law or list of laws. it’s as if they can just say things are “according to law” without actually having anything to back it up, other than the position/title of the person speaking.

  • Surfeit

    While “causing a negative social influence” is a load of crock, that is the law. Man parked illegally, got busted, took to the internet to vent (illegally, according to the law), got busted.

    Tough shit and unlucky. Next time park properly and don’t think because everyone else is doing it you should too.

    • Don’t Believe the Hype

      is there a law in china that says you cannot speak against the police? if so, that is a bigger concern than the parking permit itself

      • Surfeit

        No there isn’t. So, no it isn’t.

        • David

          Yes there is, that is what the article is about, not a guy getting a parking ticket.

          • Surfeit

            Check again.

  • noodles76

    It is disturbing. It was a very stupid thing for him to say…especially considering that if he parked legally he would not have been in the situation at all….but if they put in jail everyone who acts like a dick on the internet…um…hmm….oh shit….

    • linette lee

      But we all said nasty things behind the traffic police when we get traffic tickets. LOL. We will be in trouble if we get arrested just by criticizing the gov’t online. Where is our human rights?

      • Surfeit

        Not in China.

  • SonofSpermcube

    I would like to know just how this guy was parking.

  • Rick in China

    I especially like this: “The police microblog released this information to remind netizens to not say whatever they please anonymously on the internet, and that violations of the law must be punished.”

    I’d like to dredge up old posts, and bring those who were ranting on and on about how “free” China is compared to other countries, and ask them – do you dare show your face, or are you…like this microblogger deems police to be, cowards? WOOP, apparently I’ll also be in detention for 5 days and have to pay a fine. Don’t dare call people you don’t know cowards online, or you’ll be thrust beneath the Great Heel.

    (btw I copyright the term “Great Heel”, and think it perfectly describes mainland oppression)

    • Surfeit

      Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel Great Heel

    • David

      What do you see for the logo? Big red leather boot crushing a poor Chinese head? Lets talk marketing rights.

  • Chinese people getting slapped around like bitches in their own country

    • YourSupremeCommander

      Shut up geisha, now go wash my under pants and roll me some sushi.

  • Mighty曹

    He could be my distant cousin (曹) but it definitely sounds like he was exaggerating and being a sourpussy for getting a fine.

    • Surfeit

      Sourpussy! New favourite word!

  • Zappa Frank

    I wonder if we could be punished too if we talk bad about police or whatever on chinasmack since some of us live in china… anyway it’s really disturbing. I wouldn’t say once more about the laser pen, but i’m sure during the 5 days of detention he got a laser pen…

  • Jahar

    I’d like to see what the law he broke actually was. Calling someone a coward doesn’t actually qualify as slander, by the western definition. And I can’t imagine the penalty includes jail time.

    • noodles76

      Many Chinese laws are incredibly vague. They can find a reason to put you in jail for just about anything if they so desire. However, in this particular case he broke a specific law that says you can’t publicly talk smack to the police. It was in the post….last paragraph I think. I guess if you whisper it into the cops ear it’s OK. Give it a go!

      Also, it actually does in fact qualify as slander under the ‘western’ definition. Slander is making a false statement to hurt somebodies reputation. Calling a particular police officer…or all police officers… cowards can be construed as slander.

      • Jahar

        Calling someone a coward is opinion, not a statement of fact.

        • noodles76

          Tell me …..where in the definition of slander does it differentiate between the two?

          • Jahar

            you can’t say that someone’s opinion is not true. Slander has to be false.

          • Surfeit

            In definition, but not in law.

          • Rick in China

            It could be said that there is no proof that this guy is a coward, and without hard proof that he is, publicly making that statement about him is slandering his reputation.

            The difference is in the wording:

            In my opinion that is a cowardly way to behave.
            That man is a coward.

            The statement of fact is, “That man is a coward”. The opinion version is, In my opinion that’s cowardly.

            Just to clarify, the text written was “真孬种”. He didn’t say it was cowardly. He said they are TRUELY cowards. Supposing a statement of fact. Maybe it’s false, good luck proving that.

            Slandered. Done.

            That being said, should someone be harassed, let alone locked up, for calling civil servants things like cowards? Fuck no. That’s ridiculous and locking ’em up only PROVES the fact they’re TRULY cowards, afraid of any public criticism.

            (hides from detention)

          • noodles76

            No, it doesn’t. Anyway, seems like you’re trying to use the legal definition of slander instead of the common definition…problem for you is….you’re still wrong. Truth is not always a defense. Look guy, there is nothing wrong with..um…being wrong. just accept it and move on. You’re trying too hard to be right and embarrassing yourself more.

          • Jahar

            Legal definition? it’s a legal term. and there are more definitions of it? the only one I’ve ever heard was that it was spreading false information for the purpose of doing harm. I don’t see how I’m wrong.

            Truth is not a defense? What does that even mean? It’s part of the meaning of the word.

          • Jahar

            Slander has to be untrue.

        • Surfeit

          Thus qualifying as slander.

  • mattman183

    网易黑龙江省哈尔滨市手机网友 ip:113.0.*.*:

    I resolutely disagree with you people saying “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”, because how can something like “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” be so casually said? First of all, “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” is simply fabricated slander. Second, even if you believe “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”, you shouldn’t write “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” on the internet, because if you write “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards” everywhere, everyone will actually believe “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”. Look at me, I don’t casually write online “Yanzhou traffic police are cowards”.

    Slow clapping for this person.

    • Free Man

      My favorite comment as well. If you have to insult chinese government from within China, at least do it in a smart way. Hell, he even managed to do it 8 times.

    • firebert5

      That was stellar.

  • Insomnicide

    The Stanford experiment proves to us that people become arseholes when given the power of authority. And when you give these people political leverage as well…well….this happens.

  • Barack Obama

    FUCK THE JING CHA

  • Irvin

    Woke up this morning and almost the whole net is dark………….damn….

  • JackYu

    In theory this could happen to you in many other countries, including western countries. However, the arrest would have to be ruled by a court and could not be imposed by the traffic police directly:

    http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defamation

    • xiaode

      No way you get 5 days administrative detention for that in an EU country! No f…… way!

  • wildcav

    I wonder what would happen to the guys from NWA if the song “F%^k the police” was sung in china.

    • Surfeit

      First hip hop billionaire motherfucker! Straight from the West coast!

    • Insomnicide

      Nothing. Because it’s in English.

  • firebert5

    Stop interfering with China’s internal affairs!

  • Foreign Devil

    If they had any backbone . . . hundreds of Chinese would all post “The traffic police in Yanzhou are cowards.” and dare the police to arrest and detain several hundred people. But no they would rather keep the status quo and direct their anger towards their asian neighbors over territory disputes.

  • satuon

    Did the FBA really arrest someone for saying Obama is cowardly? I can’t believe that, unless there’s more to the story than is being said.

    • David

      No, the FBI has never arrested anybody for criticizing a president, that is perfectly legal. The person was telling the same story as if it had happened in America so people would see how silly this action would sound in a free country. He was criticizing the Chinese government without criticizing the Chinese government (because he did not want to get arrested).

  • don mario

    welcome to china

  • David

    Except the article was not about a guy getting a traffic ticket.

  • David

    I have neither the desire nor the power to have you arrested. Feeling a bit persecuted? I was merely pointing out that reason for the article as your comment seemed to miss it. I mean nobody is writing articles about jerks who park bad and get tickets. Having experienced the asinine way many Chinese drivers park on the sidewalk, on the street, sometimes on both at once I have no sympathy for him getting a ticket. In fact, going to almost any local I can think of in my town you would be hard pressed to find cars that are parked in a way that WOULDN’T get them ticketed and towed in many other countries. As for WHY he did it? He parked that way because he is an inconsiderate jerk, pretty simple. He posted the comment anonymously because he is an immature jerk who felt entitled until he got caught doing what he should not have and thought he could get away with whining on-line about it. So in addition to being a jerk, he is dumb..

Personals @ chinaSMACK - Meet people, make friends, find lovers? Don't be so serious!»