Chinese Parents Abandon Children at Guangzhou Baby Hatch

A woman is giving her child away to the Baby Safety Island.

From Phoenix Online:

24 Hours at a Guangzhou Baby Hatch: Reporter Witnesses 8 Infants Abandoned

Two women are chocking with sobs outside the iron gate of the charity house.

From the night of February 26th to the morning of the 28th, over the two 12 hour opening times of Guangzhou’s “Baby Safety Island” [baby hatch/box], reporter Hou Fang witnessed 8 farewells, and 8 children being abandoned. 48 days later, on March 16th, Guangzhou’s “Baby Safety Island” was suspended. Photo is of 7:20pm on the night of February 26th, of two women choking on their sobs outside the metal gate of the welfare agency [baby hatch]. One of them was holding her child. She says her child has Down’s Syndrome. Several security guards are beside them trying to talk her out of this, but when she heard someone in the crowd said “all you have to do is put the child inside and walk right out”, she immediately stood up, still weeping, and walked step-by-step with her child in her arms towards the baby hatch. Photographed by Shi Liu.

People are arriving at the charity house to give away their kid.

On the night of February 26, at 7:50pm, a car from out of town turned and stopped in front of the welfare agency. Then, two men and a woman came out of the car, with a baby suffering from leukemia in the woman’s arms. It was the child’s relatives who took the child here, the parents couldn’t even bear to walk out of the car to look upon their child one last time. The two men explained the child’s illness to the security guards, while the woman held the child, looking at it in silence. The child lay quietly in the swaddling clothes, a quietness that was heartbreaking.

A man is crying with his child in his arms.

On the night of February 26, at around 8pm, a small man less than 160cm tall, with unkempt hair, dressed in black, with only the yellow blanket he held in his arms being particularly eye-catching. Poking out from the black was a small head, with sunken cheeks and glazed-over eyes, its gender unable to be distinguished. The man slowly walked towards the welfare agency. At the entrance, he timidly asked the residents gathered there: ”Will they really let me in?” The man was stopped by the security guards. They asked him: ”How old is this child? Not yet 2 years old? Impossible! Overage children can’t be left here.” The man insisted for a few minutes, but eventually confessed that the child was “a little more than 4 years old”. Then he started to cry, and his words could not be understood. “If you don’t take [the child], no one else will. The doctor says [the child] can’t be cured.” The man sat under the shade of a tree, buried his face in the blanket. The child started to giggle, the leg that stuck out of the blanket looking like just skin over bones. A little more than 10 minutes later, he suddenly stood up, and with the child in his arms walked out the entrance. As he left the welfare agency, as if fearing the light, he disappeared into the shade of the trees just as he had emerged from them when he first arrived. Originally he said that he came all the way from Guangxi to give away his child, but later it was learned that he was from a small town from the northern part of Guangdong.

Two women are walking into the Baby Safety Island.

[February] 26th, women carrying children, ultimately stepping into the baby hatch.

The nurses are taking a foundling away for aid.

[February] 26th, after a baby is placed in the baby hatch, security guards watch the door until medical personnel come and take the baby away.

Two parents are giving their child away.

On the night of February 27th, at 9:25pm, a father and mother pair wearing face masks approach [the baby hatch], a child in the woman’s arms, while the man carried a blue oxygen bag. “He has Pierre Robin syndrome, but what’s fatal is the softening of his cartilagines laryngis, and his posterior pharynx is closed,” said the man who was slightly calmer [than the woman]. The child was less than one year old. “The sole purpose of us sending the child here is its survival. Life is above all things. We just hope our child will be able to survive here.”

Two parents are crying after they have given their child away.

On the night of February 27th, at 11:06pm. This is the last goodbye, this is the last look. There are two kinds of reluctance, one is to leave with bitter resolution, and the other is to linger. The father cries with his face buried in his hands, unable to bear looking back one more time, while the mother, supporting herself on the metal door, keeps looking back. As the two were leaving, the mother put her hand on a large tree by the entrance to the baby hatch and threw up. Photographed by Shi Liu

A woman is walking into the Baby Safety Island with her child in her arms.

[February] 27th, a woman holding a child, ultimately stepping into the baby hatch.

A mother is crying after she has given away her child.

[February] 27th, a mother chocking on her sobs in the baby hatch after putting her child down.

Two parents are leaving after they have given their child away.

[February] 27th, under the night sky, just one light in front of the baby hatch shines through the night. After placing their baby in the baby hatch, parents walk away holding each other, their steps heavy.

Two parents are leaving after they have given their child away.

[February] 27th, as they walked farther and farther away, as they faced the bustling street at the intersection, their backs to the baby hatch where they had left their child, the man who had so far seemed calm and resolute finally broke down and began crying. Then, the two of them disappeared at the end of the road.

A mother is kneeling and crying with her son on the side.

February 28th, at 2:46am, the mother of a boy sank to her knees at the feet of a [baby hatch] staff member, wailing. After screaming, ”I’m in more pain that anyone else”, she passed out on the ground. Meanwhile, the boy was cheerfully pulling the metal door to the baby hatch. The mother tried to grab him, but he slipped away easily. She endured all kinds of hardships raising the boy, and after reading the news of about the baby hatch, she decided to take her boy here.

The boy is trying to get the door open.

The boy tries to open the door into the baby hatch, while it was his mother’s idea to take him here anyway. The sick boy had no idea what was going on around him and here his mother, who had been kneeling on the ground for a long time, passed out for a moment.

A discarded feeding-bottle among fallen leaves.

The fallen leaves in front of the baby hatch have gone days without being swept. A discarded feeding-bottle lies by the roadside. In the quiet of the night, lights both warm and cold entwined, like the many scenes of sad goodbyes. On one side is the baby hatch, and on the other side was the world outside the baby hatch. This is the dividing line of fate.

Comments from Phoenix Online:

凤凰网辽宁省网友 手机用户:

Because it’s difficult to see a doctor, and it’s expensive to receive medical treatment, one after another, families give up the last hope of medical treatment! Sad!

凤凰网内蒙古呼和浩特市网友 客户端用户:

Reading such news on a weekend morning right after getting up, my heart feels so heavy! A rich nation of poor people living under great stress!

凤凰网湖北省武汉市网友 赖守亮:

In the face of serious and terrible illnesses, where can ordinary families go for help?!

凤凰网湖北省武汉市网友 客户端用户:

Speechless. Their pain is beyond the understanding of simple moral judgement! I hope our country’s disease intervention and treatment can cover more of children’s major illnesses, and also hope doctors can spend more of their energy on improving their skills. But of course, what we hope more is for society to exercise greater discretion when it comes to the morality of premarital sex, on the responsibility of parents, and on the examinations and choices of good bearing and rearing of children, so that we do not personally cause a life of misery for our children!

凤凰网湖北省武汉市网友 手机用户:

If it wasn’t because there weren’t any other options, who would be willing to give away their own children?! That mother was right: I just want him to survive. Sending her child to Safety Island is also a mother’s love. She’s still a great mother, even if she had to part with her child!

Comments from Sina:

下一分钟的约定 [广东汕头]:

Truth is, many abandoned babies suffer from some kind of illness, where the medical expenses are too high, and the parents are unable to afford it, left with no choice but to abandon them. If China’s healthcare system doesn’t reform, [social] upheaval truly will occur!

用户3897318922 [广东汕头]:

These children are sufferers of major illnesses, and the expenses for a child like this far exceed the expenses of 10 even 20 normal children. This is the result of shortcomings in our social security systems for major illnesses. Sending [these children] to such emergency relief stations allows them to get free treatment, and a sliver of hope for survival. Otherwise, they’d just be waiting to die. I hope our country can put “social support fees” to good use, as opposed to lining the pockets of corrupt officials.

用户3897318922 [广东汕头]:

Looking at the last picture, “The Dividing Line of Fate–An Abandoned Feeding Bottle Among Fallen Leaves”, I cried. Doesn’t this precisely depict these abandoned babies’ fates?

惟有常 [北京]:

Poor parents. The lack of a system for providing support to sick and disabled children.

85哎呀 [北京]:

The poorer people are, the more they have children, and the more children they have, the poorer they become.

Comments from QQ:

乡思静:

My son is 3 years old now, has cerebral palsy. We too considered giving him up at a baby box. But we just couldn’t bear to do it. I can’t bear to think of the helplessness of a child without parents. So I’ll just endure the hardship [for my son’s sake]. I sincerely hope all children’s parents can be as strong as I am, carrying on the hope in our children’s hearts.

◎ 花娘:

China has money to lend to America, but doesn’t have money to help the impoverished common people, and even confiscates their land by force. Corrupt officials and unscrupulous businessmen in collusion, robbing and killing people, totally lawless! Ding my comment up to 5,000 times, and I’ll become a thug [killer], to kill all of China’s corrupt officials. I’ll do what I say. [28,784 upvotes at time of translation]

一切随缘淡定生活:

My son was born with a cleft palate, and without surgery, he probably won’t even be able to speak clearly. His mother divorced me, but I must give him the surgery when he’s about 3 years old, give him a healthy future. I won’t abandon him, I won’t give up! My son, you dad will always love you!

Comments from NetEase:

富士康北门艺剪坊店长 [网易广东省广州市网友]:

The news is saying [the Baby Safety Island project is on halt due to] lack of funds and lack of beds. Then, may I ask, what has the country done with each year’s One-Child Policy violation fees? You may say it has been spent on feasting and drinking [by government officials], but this trend has already been prohibited, and the Three Public Funds [funds covering government officials’ international business travel, vehicle purchasing and usage, and entertainment expenses] have been lessened a great deal as well. Can a just a tiny bit of this money be taken out to support us ordinary common people? To allow this baby hatch [program] that is i line with international practice continue operating? I hereby entreat the relevant leaders, you live in high places, the life of the common people of our country should be of your utmost concern!!

跟贴局局长他马球 [网易广东省深圳市网友]:

Editor [moderator/censors] of NetEase:

What I write here today, regardless of whether it is reasonable or not, I hope you can present it to the eyes of the people. These people’s children are nonetheless children. And I am a very specialized expert in many professions. Not all the illnesses were developed in their mothers’ wombs. These wu mao, with no medical knowledge whatsoever, are intentionally shifting people’s attention. In fact, Chinese parents value their children even more than foreign parents. It is only when they are extremely desperate will they give away their children, and only out of hope that the children can thus survive.

In a country where even catching a cold can cost thousands of kuai to treat, can you say these parents can really afford the expenses of treating these illnesses? Our country every year levies so many taxes on various things from us, and they spend it all on real estate. If they could take out 1% of those funds, it would be more than enough for the medical expenses of all 1.4 billion people throughout the country. The trillions of assets corrupt officials embezzle every year, would be enough for all the expenses of all the ordinary common people of China.

But in a crooked time like this, as long as it involves the welfare of the people even in the slightest, [the government will claim that] they don’t have the money. But when it comes to giving money to foreign countries, to corrupt officials, to unexplained government vehicle expenses and the like, it can cost trillions a year and the money is always enough. As long as it involves the people, [they’ll say that they] don’t have any. Is this normal?

I’m not afraid, go ahead and “send a delivery” [similar to “checking the water meter“], I just hope the editor can let my comment be seen, if you really are human. But of course if you’re not, then there’s nothing I can say!

夏小阿碗 [网易江苏省镇江市网友]:

Proving that regular health examinations before pregnancy is still necessary…

网易江苏省网友 ip:153.3.*.*:

If it’s not for the times are tough, which parents would give away their children? And, pre-marriage health examinations [for diseases] are very important, because whatever the reason, the ones who are hurt in the end are always the children…

压力山大而死 [网易海南省海口市网友]:

Let’s also send the ape kind to the Diaoyu Islands!

Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • Timeless Love

    who would want a down syndrome baby..

    • Markus Peg

      In theory, the parents that had that baby. Unfortunately with it being so easy to abandon a child, they take the easy route for themselves with little thought about the child.

      • Timeless Love

        From what I remember back in China.. children with mental disabilities are treated poorly by both the parents and the society. I think its better for such programs to exist… the child would probably suffer even more under such parents.

        • Markus Peg

          Then i would suggest education to change the mentality of
          thought towards children with disabilities from parents and society rather than encourage it by allowing society to discard unwanted mentally challenged babies.

          Tackle the root of the problem not just the leaves you can see.

          • SonofSpermcube

            The root of the problem is that it is a dead end for a family, especially a poor family, to have a disabled child in China. Even with state support caring for a severely disabled child is a fate I wouldn’t wish on anyone. Without it, well…that’s why disabled infants sometimes suffer mysterious wasting illnesses that totally don’t stem from not feeding them, or why disabled toddlers “accidentally” drown in bathtubs.

          • Markus Peg

            Yes, that’s part of the problem, costs, though it is unfair to tell poor people not to have children, maybe the government should get more involved in supporting them?

            I’m not sure, i don’t have all the answers, but, i know that it most certainty is not setting up abandon centers all over China.

          • 나비

            I dont agree about not setting up the infant drop zones. Its the same reason for not outlawing abortion. Whether or not its legal, it will still happen. People who want to abandon their child will do it whether or not there is somewhere safe to do it. Or if they have no safe place, may resort to murder. Providing a national healthcare with coverage for disabled children would go along ways in to help parents be able to keep yheir child. Also the mentalities about handicapped children and people need to chamge. The way asians view those born less then perfect is…..very sad. And it isnt just,Chinese who view disabled as sub humans. I had a friend in Korea who asked if we cwould take his daughter to the USA if she suffered from mental retardation from some surgeries she had because he didnt want her to be treated the way handicapped children are treated in Korea and he wanted her to have access to services. Sadly, she died at 10 months. Anyway outlawing baby hatches wont do anything but put these babies in the forest, under bridges, etc. Its very heartbreaking.

          • Markus Peg

            But don’t you think it also encourages those that would not normally abandon a child to do so. In the story above the woman was crying but only put the baby their when someone shouted “all you have to do is put the child
            inside and walk right out”, she immediately stood up and did so…

            I understand your point of view, which does make it hard as it does have some benefits such as stopping those that would kill their child or abandon the child somewhere horrible. All countries have this problem to some extent. But 8 children within 12 hours is a lot, thats just one of many abandon centers… imagine how many that would be if they were all over China…?

            Its a mixture of society the system and the parents that create this problem. As i said above i don’t have all the answers but i just feel this method is counter productive.

            I feel more bad comes from it that good, If it were your job to think of an alternative what would you do?

          • linette lee

            Markus…That is so not true. People who wants to abandon their child will do it no matter what. You need these agencies. Also poor families can’t afford to raise a sick child.

          • Guang Xiang

            I’m going to play devil’s advocate here but I had a teacher who taught AP level biology. He had a serious topic about down syndrome and how he believed abortion is ultimately the best, though painful, solution. He’s American and certainly well-educated.

            I do believe that the root of the problem though is the cost of medical examinations. DS can be determined before birth, though it has to be around 4 months in.

        • linette lee

          China needs to support these programs for the handicap.
          China must have it. It’s the right thing to do.
          China needs to control their population. Enforce one child policy. Educate and enforce prevention. Give them birth control pills or NuvaRing or other birth control options for free. Test and screen for genetic diseases. One child each family that’s it. Consent abortion should be free. Practice prevention and not forced abortion.

          • SonofSpermcube

            A two child limit would create less pressure to abandon children, would lessen the need to have exceptions, would lessen the pressure to abort or kill girls, and would still lead to population decline. Might work better than a one-child policy because it would be easier to enforce.

    • FYIADragoon

      Downs can be diagnosed in the womb. If this wasn’t China, where pre-natal services are limited based on your connections, they could have avoided this.

      • Probotector

        “where pre-natal services are limited based on your connections”

        What are you talking about? That’s not true at all.

    • mr.wiener

      Someone who has love to give a child perhaps?

    • http://www.evolutionvsgod.com/ Rich

      Why not have a down syndrome baby? We are here to care for others, not ourselves. If I have one, I will be the one to raise him/her in a happy home, to sacrifice for that living soul.

  • Markus Peg

    These people should not be allowed to have another child. Because they lack parental qualities, i hope it is on the system that they have already had a baby and understand they cannot have another one.

    • linette lee

      A sick child requires lots of financial support and medical care. These parents did the right thing. The sick children need medical care and China don’t have welfare to help these families. If it is genetic defects these parents really shouldn’t risk to have another child. They should go for adoption. Give their love to another healthy child and pray their own sick child get the most medical help from these agencies.

      China needs to enforce one child policy. Practice prevention instead of forced abortion. Test and screen to detect down syndromes and other genetic diseases.

      • grand

        china doesn’t need one child policy, to do more to decrease birth defects however is a must.

        • SonofSpermcube

          Instead they’re doing the opposite.

      • http://www.richardfordphotography.com/ Richard Ford

        Tests? Seriously. What is this gattaca?

        • Misiooo

          Sterilization and licensing rights to ‘have’ children is the only solution. But off course government needs fresh blood, so they prefer masses breed without a concern. Fact that millions and millions of children are born to be doomed does not bother people much, maybe for a few minutes when they see some ‘heartbreaking’ footage like the one above.

          • Probotector

            “Sterilization and licensing rights to ‘have’ children is the only solution”

            No, that’s a fascist draconian solution. Societies around the world need to do more to educate people to be more responsible and to provide more social welfare services to assist those in need to cope.

          • Misiooo

            “Societies around the world need to do more to educate people ” – educate about what? Why so many children have to suffer for whole life just because their biological parents copulated carelessly for a few minutes? A propos ‘fascist’, vide below.

          • Probotector

            I already stated what they should be educated about. How are birth defects a result of “careless” copulation? No one can predict or prevent birth defects at conception.

  • DD Bear

    I would never let myself have a sick baby!
    Should abort early!

    • Free Man

      Yeah, killing your child is definitely much better! I wonder why nobody aborted you …

      • linette lee

        It’s better to abort if a child has down syndrome or if you detect illness or abnormality in fetus.

        • Irvin

          Too bad they couldn’t check for stupidity, or you’d never be born.

        • Free Man

          Why is that so?

      • DD Bear

        Go away!
        You should check your sperm first, maybe already too weak to make a healthy baby!
        O, I am sorry for you!

      • Probotector

        Masterful

  • Insomnicide

    I wonder, just what kind of circumstances led them to give birth to a mentally disabled child that they did not want? These days, it’s easier to get an abortion than getting pregnant.

    • SonofSpermcube

      How easy is it for a poor person in China to get the kind of prenatal care that would allow them to discern that they should?

      • Insomnicide

        Guangzhou is one of the more developed regions in China, it wouldn’t be much of a problem compared to say…backwater rural provinces.

        • SonofSpermcube

          And Los Angeles is one of the more developed regions of the US; that doesn’t stop people from being unable to afford medical care there.

    • Probotector

      Mental disability is not easy to detect during pregnancy. Chances are they were unaware of it during the pregnancy. If they were, then maybe they couldn’t afford the abortion, or didn’t want it because they didn’t want to deny the child a life, who knows. It’s not so clear cut.

      Btw “These days, it’s easier to get an abortion than getting pregnant.” That makes no sense.

  • Rick in China

    THIS… IS… SPARTA!

    Seriously. This is what they did in Sparta.

    Sparta fell.

    This pisses me off, “She endured all kinds of hardships raising the boy” < FUCK OFF. Raising children isn't easy. (except my baby, she's a princess.) I hate the fact these weak willed heartless fucktards continue to reproduce, they cry about THEIR pain.. what about the abandoned baby. I fear those children are left to a fate worse than a quick death. Horrendous.

    • Free Man

      I wonder what you would say, if your little princess was sick/mentally disabled and you couldn’t afford the medicine/treatment.

      • Rick in China

        Um.. “throw her away”, like the people in the article? I think not. Try until I die. She means more to me than anything and everything I have, in every way, and I would seek out every opportunity to make sure that was never the case.

        Throwing in the towel because “it’s tough” is fucking terrible, and I can only wish those people die horribly, vanquished from the earth. You wish to what…defend them? If that’s the case I think the same of you.

        • FYIADragoon

          Its always easier to say that when you haven’t experienced any of it.

          • Rick in China

            I agree completely. I can only speak from my feelings towards my daughter, and the inability to comprehend any possible change whatsoever in that love or interest in making her the focus in my life, even if I find out later she has some serious problem. I can understand the people who end their child, then their own, life out of some sort of frustration that drives them literally crazy — more than those who can abandon their baby never to see them again, and are capable of getting over it or moving on in the least. I just can’t understand that. If you’ve the wisdom and experience to help me understand, I’d be truly interested.

          • Irvin

            Agree

        • Probotector

          You understand we’re dealing with people on this forum who don’t have the maturity to understand how to take responsibility for raising a child.

    • linette lee

      But what kind of illness this little boy has? They didn’t say. Many family can’t afford the medical care for sick children. Most of them need gov’t aid. Does China give financial aid to these families. She did the right thing giving up her son if she depleted all her resources and made all effort in taking care of her child, but yet still isn’t enough. She needs to give him up so he can get the care he needs.

      • Rick in China

        You think this random child abandonment brick & tile “baby hatch” box is going to end up taking care of seriously sick and mentally ill children?

        Are you FUCKING SERIOUS?

        • linette lee

          I am not sure hot capable are these agencies. I hope they are run probably by medical personnels and give these kids the best access to whatever they need.

          And the mother of that baby she was holding, her face is so painful. That is the reason welfare is important. The poor families with sick kids here in USA have medicaid and all kinds of social services. China needs to do that also.

          • Rick in China

            I agree *completely* with the idea that there is a competent funded agency able to better deal with children with disabilities.

            This, however, …. …. … look at it. Look at the story. The fact there is nothing more than the description of a “hatch” for anonymously dropped off babies and absolutely no insight into what is being provided for them, how can you possibly think that the parents who are “having trouble with” or found a problem with a particular baby are vindicated in abandoning them here? And the presumption that everything will be better afterwards, yeah.. better – than being with these people who are obviously incapable of taking care of children, and thus, should not be having children, perhaps – how about some insight? Are these babies being ‘put down’? Where do they go? Some magic place, I’m sure. It’s China. It’s horrendous. Defending anything about this story to me is beyond ludicrous.

          • linette lee

            You are right we don’t know how these agencies operate. They need more transparency and regulation.
            The sign at the door said “Baby safety Island.” The writing on the wall outside said “Give up your baby for love. Give priority to life.” I take it that these agencies are there to prevent unwanted babies getting killed by their parents. They encourage them to give them up instead of killing or hurting them.

          • Rick in China

            It _may_ be the case. Based on public services, healthcare, and how even hospitals appear to treat many babies with illness (or sometimes perfectly healthy ones), all I can say is, I certainly wouldn’t be eating any gutter oil bbq within a block of this place.

          • Teacher in China

            This was on the BBC a while back, with a bit more explanation about what’s involved in the whole procedure. The parents put the baby inside, when the door closes, an alarm sounds like 5 minutes later and the baby is picked up and taken to a care center with medical staff. I believe that this information was made clear to the public, so these people feel certain that their babies are going to get medical care that they themselves can’t provide.

            Actually, this hatch has now been shut down. Apparently they have no more room for babies at the care center.

          • Rick in China

            If that’s all true, that’s wonderful – I don’t necessarily believe it.. however if there is a lot of publicity around how these places are havens for the little ones, then my vitriol would be alleviated greatly. Since none of that was part of the story, given the limited context above, I maintain my vitriol was deserved until that sort of unbelievable information is proven :)

          • Teacher in China

            Hey man, a rant is understandable. It’s tough to see this kind of thing. Seems impossible, but there you go.

          • Kai

            http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS/tabid/99/ID/831031/Island-for-the-abandoned.aspx

            I thought your default assumptions about the baby hatch were kinda weird. My default assumption was that this was an anonymous drop-off point so parents wouldn’t be dumping babies out on the street, and that the babies would immediately be taken in by the government welfare agency responsible for it. The article is a bit scant on details about the program but probably because this is more of a follow-up story to earlier reporting about the baby hatch (see Global Times article) and Chinese readers presumably already have an idea of how the program operates. Still, there was this caption:

            [February] 26th, after a baby is placed in the baby hatch, security guards watch the door until medical personnel come and take the baby away.

            And in the first paragraph, “baby hatch/box” is linked to a Wikipedia article explaining how these things work. I’d say the context provided above was adequate.

    • Doge Wallace

      Rick, unless you were born/raised in China and had a kid under similar conditions, you shouldn’t be so judgmental. From the second sentence in The Great Gatsby:

      “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

      Your life is a life of privilege that most Chinese can never even imagine for themselves, and there you go spouting your mouth off saying “FUCK OFF” and acting like some moral authority because you’re from a rich country. lol

      • Rick in China

        You had me until I realized your name was a shitty meme ripoff and you ended your spew with “lol”.

        • Doge Wallace

          Doesn’t negate the point.

          “Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

          Your life is a life of privilege that most Chinese can never even imagine for themselves, and there you go spouting your mouth off saying “FUCK OFF” and acting like some moral authority because you’re from a rich country. lol (“lots of love” this time)

          • bujiebuke

            Don’t even bother reasoning with him. Instead of addressing your criticism directly, he misdirects the topic by pointing out how he doesn’t like your meme, while at the same time using a meme himself. Just read his other posts and you’ll understand what this guy’s all about.

          • Rick in China

            YES! I agree completely. If you are born into poor circumstances and are unable to financially support a child unless they are born perfect and problem free, then it is MORALLY OK to go ahead, reproduce, but if that baby is “tough”, abandon them. Got your point. Good one Doge, you win!

            Opposite of affluenza much? Povertuenza, I’m too poor so I can’t identify or behave with morality.

            I can’t believe you’re actually defending child abandonment as morally acceptable based on being born into a life of “privilege” as you assume. I can only guess the “lol” implies it’s all a joke.

            One other point here, one of these little stories, “Then, two men and a woman came out of the car” — doesn’t look like they’re so poor they can’t afford relatively new wheels, maybe 150k RMB? 200k RMB? Guess that’s more important to their family than keeping a child, fuck it just throw it in the hatch, lets go get some noodles.

          • Kai

            Being critical of you being judgmental doesn’t mean he’s defending child abandonment.

            That part of the article gives no definitive indication that the car belongs to them. For all we know, they (the parents and the relatives offering emotional support), hired a car specifically to bring the baby to the one place there was hope the child could get care they couldn’t provide. This, rather than just dumping the kid in some gutter or ditch somewhere. They sought and spent the money necessary to bring the kid to the best place they knew. I’m not sure why you’re so certain the car belongs to them and thus they value a car over their child. We just don’t know who the car belongs to. Maybe it was rented? Maybe it’s the relative’s? Hard to say, dude. Gotta be careful with the assumptions.

        • FYIADragoon

          I don’t think I’d be whining about memes if I was you.

          http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/this-is-sparta

    • bujiebuke

      I would not be living in China if I had a child of my own, no matter how lucrative of a job that was offered. Every single day that I spent eating in Shenzhen, Guilin, or Beijing, I kept thinking to myself: “Is this my last meal?”, “Am I eating gutter oil right now?”, “Am I drinking from a cup laced with lead?”, “Is there a way to detox my lungs after breathing the air here?”. And your subjugating your little girl who isn’t fully developed to ALL that shit. congrats.

      • FYIADragoon

        All of your eating problems are resolved if you’re not an ESL, and you can afford to eat at somewhere other than a hole in the wall restaurant. Learning the damn language (seems 99% of ESLs miss this one) also allows you to have locals simply lead you to the better places. I wouldn’t have even been aware that Nongfu had a scandal if a mother I work with hadn’t alerted me. An air filter fixes your apartment and costs about the same as a cocktail at a proper establishment.

        The parents dropping kids off because it was too much of a hassle are right bastards though.

        • Probotector

          Yeah, I agree that his rant about shitty food and air isn’t really as big of a deal as he makes it out to be, but it’s got nothing to do with being a foreign teacher. It seems you have a prejudice there.

          You said “I wouldn’t have even been aware that Nongfu had a scandal if a mother I work with hadn’t alerted me”. So does this mean you haven’t been “learning the damn language” either?

          • FYIADragoon

            No, it’s quite the opposite. Because I knew the language the woman was able to convey this to me. I’m not involved in commodities related work, and I typically only search online for things that could affect my work, so I didn’t hear of this until she noticed me drinking it one day in the office. I later relayed this to some expatriate coworkers of mine and they were surprised too, since Nongfu is typically very reasonably priced and easily found at Lawsons (they typically carry the better stuff). I’m not an ESL though, so I don’t typically fall into their patterns. If I didn’t have to deal with the shitty cultural impressions left by ESLs (that seem to be mostly accurate for the years I’ve spent in China running into them) I probably wouldn’t have such a chip.

          • Rick in China

            I used to drink exclusively bottled water, but after some research came to the conclusion that in Chengdu at least, the city proper water filtering is excellent (large french corporation manufactured the water system) and the regulations they need to meet in terms of water purity is far beyond the purity regulations applied to food & drink manufacturers, and that most of the water problem found in city is in older buildings with bad/rusty pipes.. so a combination of that, along with my own nice water filtration system, leads me to now *almost* exclusively drink water that has been ran through my own purifier so I can mostly trust it. At work, I do suck up the hot water from the water machine ran thru coffee maker, but I figure it’s boiled and filtered at that point so should be reasonably safe.

            China’s water conditions are scary anyways, there is a good summary on youtube, can look up “china uncensored water” or something. :D

      • Rick in China

        Not that it matters – but my baby’s passport & citizenship is processing. House has a couple air filters running 24/7, full time nanny means we don’t have to eat gutter oil, not that my baby eats anything other than overpriced imported formula and titty milk anyways, and I, like you suggest, will be moving her ass out of China as soon as paperwork is processing, we’ll keep our China properties as vacation homes. Thanks for the congrats!

        • bujiebuke

          In that case, I should congratulate you. Hopefully you won’t end up in Vancouver BC, or san francisco, or Seattle WA, or … I think you know where I’m getting at.

          Someone who’s surrounded by “titty” and ass must be doing something right in his life…

          • donscarletti

            The rest of Canada is too cold, SoCal is too hot, Oregon’s too rural and the rest of the United States has the social sophistication of medieval Scandinavia.

            If these three are out of the question, maybe try Europe or Japan.

          • Rick in China

            OZ is the place due to work and expected healthcare/clean air qualities, but I imagine he was listing towns with the largest ethnic Chinese populations…

          • ScottLoar

            “the rest of the United States has the social sophistication of medieval Scandinavia.”

            I think that’s an overly harsh judgement of medieval Scandinavia.

      • NeverMind

        We all know that life is comparatively unsafe in China. But, I wonder how my wife’s paternal grandmother who is about 76 years old now survived Cancer without expensive treatment (one son died of hunger, couldn’t afford expensive treatment for her Cancer) and can walk up to 5 storeys of stairs. Wife’s maternal grandmother who is about 88 is a little less healthy but can still walk those 5 storeys (they don’t have an elevator in their building!) Compare this to an average western elderly person who is usually overweight and in the worst of health conditions during this age.

        I have absolutely no doubt that the air that they breathe and the food that they eat in western countries is much much safer, but I sincerely wonder sometimes what makes Chinese healthier in general? Have they grown immune to much of the stuff we suffer from?

        • Probotector

          Diet.

    • grand

      i agree with you that they should be responsible to their sick children. but i don’t doubt for a second that you would be the first to abandon handicapped children if you were in their shoes.

      • Probotector

        Really? I can’t imagine anyone would actually do that.

    • wnsk

      EVERYTHING makes you angry. Jeez, isn’t it tiring to live life full of hatred and cynicism and negativity? It certainly is tiresome to read your vitriolic rants.

    • Probotector

      “Raising children isn’t easy. (except my baby, she’s a princess.) ”

      So what do you really know about the hardship of raising kids?

      Okay, I know that’s not what you meant, but your statement bore a glaring contradiction.

      Yeah, I agree that it’s a nerve racking and challenging duty to raise a child, (I wouldn’t know yet, as mine’s not due for two more months) and one should always put the child’s needs ahead of themselves. Parenting, I imagine, and I fear, is difficult, but it comes with the territory and it’s this mantle of responsibility that people need to take seriously.

      When you say “I hate the fact these weak willed heartless fucktards continue to reproduce”, well in the case of China, it is largely society, not just the individual who is to blame for this. A better solution would be to educate people in China en mass about this (and a fuck load of other things about life, to be fair) in order for them to understand how to be good and responsible parents who know to stick with their kids through thick and thin. However, I doubt this will actually happen here.

      • Rick in China

        Truths.

      • bujiebuke

        Your last paragraph reminded me of a movie that I stumbled upon when I was watching tv in Beijing 8 yrs ago. It was about a single father with his 10 yr old son who has down syndrome. The father learns that he’s terminally ill and worries his son won’t be able to take care of himself. He resolves in poisoning himself and his son but his friends eventually talk him out of it. The rest is a very touching story.

        At the time, it made me think that China was progressing in the right direction. Perhaps more of those types of movies should be made in China.

      • Kai

        I think the more glaring contradiction in some of these emotional criticisms is that there is no lack of Chinese parents who “stick with their kids through thick and thin”.

        Your comments are made with the worst examples in mind, when there are countless examples of Chinese parents who surely aren’t perfect but have lived lives that evidence their love for their children and their willingness to sacrifice so much of themselves in hopes of providing a better life for their children. For all the “cultural differences” between Chinese society and X society, both societies are still far and away characterized as societies where parents love their children and children love their parents.

        It thus seems unfair to be saying “people in China” need to be educated “en masse” this and “en masse” that, especially when you guys are doing so in response to an article where parents are doing something they clearly feel conflicted and are agonizing about. Do we see any of them happily tossing their baby away? No, so where is all this certainty that these people are “weak willed heartless fucktards” coming from? Is this really a justifiable characterization in response to what we see above? To me, it seems like an overreaction.

        • Probotector

          This wasn’t my point it was Rick’s. I was merely bolstering his point that raising children is a massive responsibility and that most Chinese people need to be better educated on this. I never said “weak willed heartless fucktards”, I was quoting Rick. Please read more carefully.

          • Kai

            Sorry for the confusion. I was responding to what you and Rick are talking about, not accusing you of making that specific point or saying those specific words. What I was responding to is how you quoted Rick’s characterization and broadened it into overall Chinese society. While Rick could say he’s just lambasting specific individuals guilty of being “weak willed heartless fucktards”, you wouldn’t be able to. It’s like a Chinese person who exclaims that Americans need to taught en masse how to be filial based on misleading vividness of parents being put into nursing homes and not sticking with the people who raised them “through thick and thin”. I’d say that’s an overreaction as well if not an unfair general characterization of American society.

    • Markoff

      The reason why Sparta fell was for sure not because they eliminated weak offsprings.

      • Rick in China

        Actually, that is not true. That was a large part of why it fell – they did not have enough Spartans to maintain their elite “trustworthy” forces. Since they had to rely so heavily on helots – slaves becoming free men eventually permeated Spartan society, where the minority of the society which Sparta controlled ended up being actual Spartans – and as a result their power dwindled and they were decaying from the inside. The question isn’t why they fell – it should be could they have become the Sparta they became *without* eliminating weaker offspring.

        • sonotso

          The population wasn’t just low because they eliminated weaker offspring, but also because they did not view children that were only half-Spartan as Spartan and anyone from outside Sparta could also not become Spartan. Cities have grown all over the world at first because people from nearby villages and towns moved to those cities. But in Sparta even these close neighbours were seen as inferior and could not join the military.

          Also, men spent little time with their wives in Sparta, married relatively late and that also must have affected the reproduction rate.

  • Q Ball

    Right no alot of Chinese parents do not see the child as an individual, but as an extension of themselves that in old age is supposed to care for the parents (a duty). Better to let go of a failure and then try again. It is a form of selfishness

  • vonskippy

    Luckily the Chinese government is focusing on important issues, like banning American zombie tv shows instead of taking care of all those pesky Chinese children.

    • grand

      this whole story of banning US shows is sham. china already clarified that no US tv shows were banned. not that they care much about american tv show. go to the chinese streaming sites that run the shows you see they have 1/100 of the view count of chinese tv series. i doubt the vast majority would even notice even if they were banned.

      also, the whole point of open this baby hatch is an attempt by the government to take care sick children that the parents are not able to take care of. but of course you didn’t read the article you just here for china bashing.

      • Irvin

        I thought they were censoring not banning. They already do this to all the movies in theater.

  • Dax

    “After screaming, ‘I’m in more pain that anyone else,’ she passed out on the ground.”

    Fuck you. It’s not about you. If you’re giving up a sick child you can’t afford to care for, then I salute you. But don’t then try to say “Oh, woe is me! Surely I am the most unfortunate of all mankind!”

    You know who’s probably going to be in worse pain? Your terminally ill child. Giving them up to someone better able to care for them is noble, but then making yourself out as the center of attention is utterly deplorable.

    • Kai

      I think she was saying she’s more torn and in pain about this decision than anyone else, which I imagine a mother would be. She isn’t saying she’s the most unfortunate, she’s expressing agony, being caught between a rock and a hard place.

  • Dax

    “Proving that regular health examinations before pregnancy is still necessary…”

    Get fucked. As a child of adoption, born with a heart condition, I’d rather deal with lifelong health defects than be goo at the bottom of a hospital dumpster that never got a chance to live.

    Killing a baby because it might be difficult to raise them is morally reprehensible, especially with so many couples hoping to adopt infants.

    If you care more about your own financial status than the well-being of your children, then you don’t deserve to be a factor in their lives anyway. Give them away, but don’t deny them the chance to live just because it’s inconvenient for you.

    • Guang Xiang

      What about if you have down syndrome?

      • Dax

        Are you suggesting that people with mental disabilities don’t deserve to live?

        • Guang Xiang

          No, it was an honest question.

          In your case, medical treatment can help mitigate your condition and allow you to join us today on these forums and a part of society.

          As for down syndrome, you are unable to interact with society, which is an important facet of being human.

          • Probotector

            …but not a prerequisite.

          • Guang Xiang

            fair enough. sorry if my question sounded rude

            As for me, raising a child with disabilities would be within my capabilities, but it’s just so hard to say for those who come from difficult backgrounds

          • fabulous

            I’m not sure if you are confusing Down’s Syndrome with something else. People with Down’s Syndrome are still able to interact with society; just at a different level. Functionality will come at many different levels and that is where the real issue with mental disabilities sits. At what point do you become so depressed at how bad your kid is (or will be) at fitting-in that you just give up on it?
            If you are relying on your kid as an investment then that cut off point will be much lower and your ability to react at that point much easier.

          • Irvin

            The child would be a burden to the parents, the society and the specie. In a natural environment these children will be allowed to die out, only in illogical human morals can these children live.

            It’s more to the parent’s selfishness than the good of our specie or the child, it should be allow to die with pride instead of live in pain and suffering.

          • Rick in China

            See above for the epitome of “losing one’s humanity”.

          • Irvin

            Humanity is an illogical obsolete genetic flaw.

          • Kai

            There are ideals and then there is reality. I think most people who discover a debilitating disease in their fetus choose to abort it rather than carry it to term. Those who don’t or can’t screen for such things either end up with trying to raise the child or abandoning them. I’m not so sure, overall, that any society is really better than any other with regards to the practical decisions being made over diseased or disabled babies.

          • Probotector

            “I’m not so sure, overall, that any society is really better than any other with regards to the practical decisions being made over diseased or disabled babies.”

            Surely a nation that provides free healthcare is?!

          • Kai

            Just do internet searches on abortions involving birth defects (or congenital defects/disorders). I’m pretty sure they happen in countries with nationalized/free healthcare as well. The considerations in those countries aren’t just medical expenses but also notions like whether or not the parents ideologically want a child to live a life of disability.

    • Irvin

      Euthanasia to some of these children is a mercy. In a competitive society like china where even the normal healthy people can barely make ends meet, how you expect a child with disadvantage to survive?

    • Probotector

      Fully agree, right on!

    • Markoff

      if you would been removed during pregnancy you would not realize losing life in the first place and anyway human babies don’t have self-conscience still for first few months, but I guess this will be too much for you to understand

      • Dax

        I’m sorry. Did my respect for human life somehow personally offend you so that you felt the need to insult my intelligence?

  • bujiebuke

    My mistake for today was to read this article right after eating lunch. Seriously, what the hell is wrong with these people that think it’s a good idea to abandon an already sick child to a shady/ominous little brick clinic in the middle of nowhere called “baby hatch”??

    I cannot image the dire circumstances these people are in that made them think this was their best and only option. I think they know that what they’re doing is morally wrong, judging from the fact that they’re having a meltdown right before they drop off their unwanted ones. Very sad situation.

    • Irvin

      Read the article it got answers to all your questions.

      • bujiebuke

        You know what’s odd is that I actually did read the article before posting. Yet, nowhere did it say what conditions these people were living in or their life story.

    • Kai

      Click the link on “baby hatch/box” and you can also read more about the program here (in English): http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS/tabid/99/ID/831031/Island-for-the-abandoned.aspx

      I think baby hatches as a concept are more familiar to Europeans than perhaps Americans if you’re from the States.

  • FYIADragoon

    It really is a case of “this is why we can’t have nice things.” Because if there were not so many ultrasounds and abortions for the sake of having boys during the one child policy then people would have more access to pre-natal testing. In the case of mental problems like Downs, that would allow these parents to be alerted early, so that they could make the best decision for themselves. And in the case of these children with physical problems, the Chinese medical system clearly needs an overhaul. People shouldn’t have to give away their children just so that they can receive proper medical care.

    • Probotector

      They don’t tell you the sex of the baby in major hospitals (at least not where I am). You have to go to back alley clinics to get that kind of info. Actually, all the antenatal care my wife and I have received has been specifically geared towards monitoring development, as opposed to checking whether it’s a boy or not.

    • Kai

      I don’t think pre-natal testing was affected by the OCP beyond whether or not the doctor could tell you the sex of the child. Just cuz they couldn’t tell you doesn’t mean there isn’t pre-natal testing for healthy development. A more relevant issue is whether or not parents are doing them. Many might forego it as an expense they can’t afford. A lot of countries provide assistance precisely for mothers to get this sort of care even if they are in financial hardship and are tempted to forgo such care.

  • Hamban

    As the father of an adopted special needs boy from China, I find this story especially heartbreaking. My son was left in a farmer’s market at 10 days old, and then placed by the local government in a social welfare institute where he received medical care including multiple expensive surgeries (done in connection with American medical nonprofits operating in China). Today, he is a happy, thriving toddler who is the joy in the lives of his mother and I. While he still needs significant medical care and I couldn’t imagine ever parting with him, I am so conscious that I have been blessed and am fortunate to live in America with the means and access to quality medical care. Even so, caring for him is challenging and stressful even for a fairly successful upper middle class family in one of the wealthiest parts of America. I couldn’t imagine how tough caring for him in rural Chinese provincial backwater would be.

    To my son’s biological parents: I’ll never fully comprehend the tremendous pain and loss you must feel, but I hope that someday you’ll know that your son is happy, healthy and so very loved, and his adoptive parents thank you from the bottom of their hearts for giving us the chance to raise him. We’ll never let him forget his roots, and will always raise him to know that his biological parents cared enough for him to make the hardest of choices.

    • Guang Xiang

      That’s quite a good system, despite all of China’s woes. Curious about this local government that has such a program.

      • Hamban

        My son was born somewhere in rural Henan and he was taken in to a social welfare institute in Zhengzhou. He received primary medical and foster care through local hospitals and a local family, and he also stayed at an orphanage For the surgeries, the operations were performed by American doctors working with a nonprofit in Hangzhou, and the costs for the operation were paid for by an American church that works with orphans in Henan. So my son’ care was covered by a mix of Chinese and American sources. I was very impressed by the care and compassion shown him by the Zhengzhou social welfare institute staff. Even with its limited resources, i think the Chinese system does a pretty good job of taking care of orphans.

        • Rick in China

          That’s a heartwarming story and I applaud your courage, essentially saving a little boy’s life. I’m also pleasantly surprised to hear that an abandoned little boy ended up in the hands of caring parents – a glimmer of hope in China, one that I would not have guessed, and one I would like to believe would become the norm.

          • Hamban

            @Rick. Thanks. I understand that more Chinese parents are open to adoption these days, and many of the non-special needs children that likely would have beenadopted by American and other Western couples are being adopted by Chinese families now. Many of the special needs kids are being adopted by American/Western couples, and it what’s been very special for me to meet many such families. It is important to know what kind of special needs you can handle as the adoptable kids have medical and other conditions that run the range from minor or correctable (like my son) to severe or non correctable (cerebral palsy, blindness).

            We’ve also met and made many good friends from mainland China through my son. I’m ABC (parents from Taiwan) and can speak Mandarin, so I can have good conversations and share closeness with these new friends. They are all very supportive and welcoming of my son (he has so many 阿姨 and 叔叔 now). Through him, I think many non-Chinese and Chinese people have come to see that special needs adoption can be wonderful and is not so scary as one might think. I hope people everywhere will become more open to it!

    • grand

      now this is a person that deserves all the respect. i really admire your kindness and courage.

    • Silent Observer

      Finally, some light at the end of a very dark tunnel

    • Hamban

      Thanks for the kind words, everyone. My wife and I think we’re the luckiest parents in the world!

    • DD Bear

      Why did you look for extra trouble?
      I would never do that, even if I could not have kid, I would never consider feed kid for others, even healthy one.

      • Rick in China

        “I would never consider feed kid for others” – I don’t believe they’re “feeding a kid for others”, they’re taking care of a little one who needed caring for – something that you should absolutely learn from. It’s the opposite of selfishness so common all over the world – and so visible and visceral in China. The “pure Darwinian” thinking of breed the best and let die the rest is ignoring a large component about what makes us human; our interest in building a society where we recognise imperfection as still having value, where love and family means more than just procreation and ‘getting more’, happiness is not just what you’ve garnered for yourself but what you do for others around you. It’s sad to think that you can’t see past selfish desire as a means to a fulfilling life, in fact, one of the most gratifying experiences we can have in this existence is helping those who need help, seeing smiles where there would otherwise be none, and knowing you’ve done all you can to improve the lives of many rather than focusing only on your own. Until you can get past the mindset of a selfish existence, I fear you’re doomed to live a sad life with short-lived pleasures and an unending yearning for consumption: emotional consumption, material consumption, and ultimately self-consumption. Change, or die young, either would benefit our species – the ultimate ‘Darwinian’ goal.

        • DD Bear

          You again!
          Yes, someone as you like to blahblah a lot online to show off your kindness, but it’s all fake shit to me.
          I prefer a world with less useless people, even healthy ones.
          Even I should die but I do not mind.
          But I am sure you are another useless waste food piece too.

          • mr.wiener
          • Womanizer

            and we don’t care what you think ,you attention seeking whore ,you have no compassion, kill yourself. this earth does not need you. you are retarded. how do you feel if i say that you?

      • Hamban

        @DD Bear, my wife and I chose to adopt because we wanted to be parents. There is always some element of “trouble” with kids (and my son is very 調皮 so he is always getting into trouble), but the love and pride I get from being a father is amazing.

        It is hard to explain. When I was still in my 20s, I never would have considered adopting as I bought it was like raising someone else’s kids. Honestly, if my wife and I could have had biological kids of our own I never would have thought about it. But after several years of failed fertility treatments and a period of emptiness, I found that my views on adoption had changed. Adoption made my heart grow bigger and I realized that kids can love many parents, and the act of parenting is more rewarding to the parents than to the kids. So while I’m conscious that I’ve probably made a positive difference in my son’s life, it is nothing compared to the positive difference he has made in my life.

  • grand

    this whole story of banning US shows is a misreporting. china already clarified that no US tv shows were banned. not that they care much about american tv show. go to the chinese streaming sites that run the shows you see they have 1/100 of the view of chinese tv series. i doubt the vast majority would even notice even if they were banned.

    • Boris_Da_Bengal_Tiger

      Wrong article?

  • The FRED FONG

    China invented paper….gutter oil… and the baby hatch…the world can learn from China

    • Irvin

      China didn’t invent baby hatch, click on the “baby hatch” link in the article, apparently it’s all over the world since 18th century.

  • ESL Ninja

    WTF is wrong with this country? A nation of quitters and shirkers.

  • ESL Ninja

    They should consider a zero child policy.

  • commander

    China’s anti corruption drive should lead to providing affordable and quality medical services to its people with confisticated money from venal businessmen and politicos before blaming babies with innate diseases or deformities on lack of parental precautiom of santitation or failure to use contraceptive in sex.

  • hellothere

    The US has Safe Haven laws that do the same thing. A parent can legally leave their child at a fire station or police station and make it a ward of the state. The only weird thing about this story is the journalists ghoulish enough to photograph these tragedies.

    And for the record, people with Downs Syndrome are delightful and quite capable. People give up on life way too easily.

  • Twocentsfromme

    So- is his baby mama a chinese? Then I’d never understand this kind of guy- who seemingly has deep hatred/disdain/phobia about chinese people yet joining his genetic with one. Your princess, if she’s half-chinese, one day will grow up and another foreigner like you, would look at her and mock her the way foreigners like you do to Chinese women today. Because these non-chinese guys would see only the chinese parts in her genetic makeups and their prejudice wouldn’t see her as whole human being or as herself- as a person.
    Goodluck to your little princess, she’d need it.

    • Probotector

      How self-righteous for someone who can only see things in black and white.

      Just because someone has issues with some of the facets of Chinese society doesn’t mean they hate all Chinese people.

      “non-chinese guys would see only the chinese parts in her genetic makeups and their prejudice wouldn’t see her as whole human being or as herself- as a person.”

      So all non-Chinese generalise as much as you do?

    • Rick in China

      I don’t “mock” ethnic Chinese, you’re getting twisted, ‘bruh’. I make fun of a lot of *retarded* people who live in mainland China and have a lack of sense about the world about morality, about progressive concepts. Don’t mistake that with racism.. the fact I’m in China and the issues I’m discussing involve ethnic Chinese is incidental, I often “mock” as you put it – then go home, tell my wife the issue I’ve ranted about, and her opinion is more often than not exactly the same as mine. Sometimes I translate my posts clearly and she thinks sometimes it’s a little harsh, *but often agrees with the sentiment* completely. I have no phobia or hatred for disdain for people of the Chinese ethnicity, don’t make that mistake.

  • bujiebuke

    You must have persevered through numerous hardships to reach where you are now. Your English is better than most North Americans. I would love to hear more about your story – please write more.

    • Kittykat

      Thank you! I don’t mind sharing more of my story.

  • Probotector

    Wait, so you’re saying that poor people having children creates poverty? The logic behind impoverished families being more prolific is that the children grow up and get a job themselves and bring money into the household, or maybe with more kids, it’s more likely that one of them will makes something of themselves and break the cycle of poverty. Now I’ll agree that in the short run, having a bunch of kids is expensive, but the long term as they grow up and earn their keep for the household, the benefits materialise. Now, it isn’t a totally flawless idea, but what else can those in poverty really do? In reality, the government should do more to help them and lift people out of poverty and educate them. You said you agreed with that. However, implying that poor people should not have kids is an unfair assessment when A. the majority of people in China can still be classified as poor, and B. the government can but doesn’t do more to combat poverty.

  • Foreign Devil

    These baby hatches are like lottery portals to a better life in USA. . lot’s of these kids will be adopted by wealthy barren Americans. That said. .the kids with severe mental disabilities are not going to get adopted by anyone. Because even the best doctors can’t reverse Down Syndrome or other mental disabilities. Hate to say it. but if my kid test positive for Down Syndrome or Cerebral Palsy or some other severe mental problems I’d try to abort or if born. . would send away for adoption. Let some pro-life Christian adopt him.

  • Irvin

    Do elaborate.

  • commander

    I have a question. How will babies entrusted to the agency be treated in the future?

    • Kai

      Hard to say. It’s like orphanages and foster care systems everywhere. It depends on who ends up taking care of you and if they’re good or bad people. If you get someone good, you’ll love them more than your birth parents. But you might get someone bad, who sees you as a meal ticket and nothing more. Some come out being thankful of the system, while others wish they were aborted instead.

  • paneraman

    “China has money to lend to America, but doesn’t have money to help the impoverished common people, and even confiscates their land by force. Corrupt officials and unscrupulous businessmen in collusion, robbing and killing people, totally lawless!”

    This is very true. CCP have monetary funds to have a annual anti-japan protest, S&R for MH370, lend $ to US/EU etc. yet the people can’t afford a basic health care. And I’m just talking about common cold where a good rest & good food are necessary to recover; in china, it’s all about selling bunch of drugs that aren’t even necessary.

    • Kai

      True, and Americans can build stealth bombers but not provide universal healthcare.

      It isn’t that simple. I wish it was though.

  • Markoff

    contraception + especially pregnancy diagnostics availability FAIL

    isn’t baby hatch supposed to be anonymous, so WTF security guards do there trying to talk people out of this, seriously? they will pay money to the parents that they dare to speak?

    • Kai

      Yeah, I thought that was kind of weird too at first. Maybe those security guards aren’t associated with the baby hatch itself but are just nearby and have, over time, come to feel they should try discouraging such parents who come by, perhaps like Rick in China, thinking they have a moral duty to dissuade these parents if they can. Or maybe the parents sought information and advice from them and they offered it. I’m a bit iffy on the timeline. It was also news that they couldn’t take on any more kids and were temporarily suspending the program, so maybe the guards were there to turn people away.

  • Probotector

    No, but they choose the option that’s most convenient for them.

  • wnsk

    lol. +1 just for playing devil’s advocate.

  • Hamban

    I hope I’ll be able to help raise my son (also adopted from China) to be as mature, confident and well spoken as you!

    • Kittykat

      Thank you! What you said was very insightful!

  • Misiooo

    Oh yes, heil me! Now, seriously, are you people so thoroughly brainwashed by newspeak? It was fascist government in Italy and Nazi in Germany who totally banned abortions and conducted pro-family policies for its citizens, best at the time. So before you label someone, think it over.

  • Jenxl

    I don’t know how I stumbled onto ChinaSMACK, but after 20 minutes reading articles on this site, I’m just bawling my eyes out at work in my cube.

    • http://www.youtube.com/user/VictimOfBoredom Matt

      Once you go chinaSMACK you never go back…to being non-traumatized.

      • Probotector

        I concur.

      • Jenxl

        :) now ain’t that the truth

        • Probotector

          @disqus_sZe140t687:disqus The question is why are so many CS articles so negative?

    • mr.wiener

      Welcome to the club…we have T-shirts.

Personals @ chinaSMACK - Meet people, make friends, find lovers? Don't be so serious!»