Government Office Buildings Throughout China Awe Inspiring

A Chinese government building in Tangshan.

Recently, Chinese netizens on various different popular Chinese BBS internet discussion forums have begun circulating and collectively contributing to a collection of photographs taken all around China. With a name that sounds similar to the recent “Photograph and Rescue Child Beggars” campaign, the “Photograph Your Area’s Government Office Building” Chinese netizen phenomenon “exposes” the government office buildings found in various provinces, counties, cities, and towns throughout China that “cause people to stare in awe”. It is said that these photos reveal that the scale and splendor of government office buildings even in impoverished areas of China’s western interior certainly do not “lose in the slightest” to those in China’s wealthier coastal areas.

Here, we have collected the images that have been posted by netizens so far on several posts found on Mop, China.com, & KDS.

Yantai city, Shandong province:

A Chinese government building in Yantai city of Shandong province, China.

A Chinese government building in Yantai city of Shandong province, China.

Tai’an city, Shandong province:

A Chinese government building in Taian city of Shandong province, China.

Qingyang city, Gansu province:

A Chinese government building in Qingyang city of Gansu province, China.

Shanghai:

A Chinese government building in Shanghai, China.

A Chinese government building in Shanghai, China.

Bayannaoer city, Inner Mongolia:

A Chinese government building in Baiyannaoer city of Inner Mongolia, China.

A Chinese government building in Baiyannaoer city of Inner Mongolia, China.

A Chinese government building in Baiyannaoer city of Inner Mongolia, China.

Luliang city, Shanxi province:

A Chinese government building in Luliang city of Shanxi, China.

Shuozhou city, Shanxi province:

A Chinese government building in Shuozhou city of Shanxi, China.

Yuncheng city, Shanxi province:

A Chinese government building in Yuncheng city of Shanxi, China.

Chongqing:

A Chinese government building in Chongqing.

Hebi city, Henan province:

A Chinese government building in Hebi city of Henan, China.

Laiwu city, Shandong province:

A Chinese government building in Laiwu city of Shandong, China.

Linfeng city, Shanxi province:

A Chinese government building in Linfeng city of Shanxi, China.

Wenzhou city, Zhejiang province:

A Chinese government building in Wenzhou city of Zhejiang, China.

Anhui province:

A Chinese government building in Anhui, China.

Sanya city, Hainan island:

A Chinese government building in Sanya city of Hainan, China.

Tieling city, Liaoning province:

A Chinese government building in Tieling city of Liaoning, China.

Luoyang city, Henan province.

A Chinese government building in Luoyang city of Henan, China.

Xinxiang city, Henan province:

A Chinese government building in Xinxiang city of Henan, China.

A Chinese government building in Xinxiang city of Henan, China.

A Chinese government building in Xinxiang city of Henan, China.

Hukou county, Jiujiang city, Jiangxi province:

A Chinese government building in Hukou county of Jiujiang city of Jiangxi, China.

Ruichang city, Jiangxi province:

A Chinese government building in Ruichang city of Jiangxi, China.

Unknown:

A huge government office building in China.

An extravagant Chinese government office building in China.

An expansive Chinese government office building in China.

A beautiful Chinese government office building in China.

A large Chinese government office building in China.

A vast Chinese government office building in China.

A majestic Chinese government office building in China.

An opulent Chinese government office building in China.

Jiedong county, Guangdong province:

A Chinese government building in Jiedong county of Guangdong, China.

Chengdu city, Sichuan province:

A Chinese government building in Chengdu city of Sichuan, China.

A Chinese government building in Chengdu city of Sichuan, China.

A Chinese government building in Chengdu city of Sichuan, China.

A Chinese government building in Chengdu city of Sichuan, China.

Shangrao city, Jiangxi province:

A Chinese government building in Shangrao city of Jiangxi, China.

A Chinese government building in Shangrao city of Jiangxi, China.

Tanghe county, Nanyang city, Henan province:

A Chinese government building in Tanghe county of Nanyang city of Henan, China.

Guye county, Tangshan city, Hebei province:

A Chinese government building in Tangshan.

Hai’an county, Nantong city, Jiangsu province:

A Chinese government building in Hai'an county of Nantong city of Jiangsu, China.

Daqing city, Heilongjiang province:

A Chinese government building in Daqing city of Heilongjiang, China.

Wuxi city, Jiangsu province:

A Chinese government building in Wuxi city of Jiangsu, China.

A Chinese government building in Wuxi city of Jiangsu, China.

A Chinese government building in Wuxi city of Jiangsu, China.

A Chinese government building in Wuxi city of Jiangsu, China.

A Chinese government building in Wuxi city of Jiangsu, China.

Dazhou city, Sichuan province:

A Chinese government building in Dazhou city of Sichuan, China.

Fuyang city, Anhui province:

A Chinese government building in Fuyang city of Anhui, China.

Changsha city, Hunan province:

A Chinese government building in Changsha city of Hunan, China.

A Chinese government building in Changsha city of Hunan, China.

Chaohu city, Anhui province:

A Chinese government building in Chaohu city of Anhui, China.

Unknown:

An impressive government building and park in China.

A magnificent government office building in China.

Kelamayi city, Xinjiang province:

A Chinese government building in Kelamayi city of Xinjiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Kelamayi city of Xinjiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Kelamayi city of Xinjiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Kelamayi city of Xinjiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Kelamayi city of Xinjiang, China.

Nantong city, Jiangsu province:

A Chinese government building in Nantong city of Jiangsu, China.

A Chinese government building in Nantong city of Jiangsu, China.

A Chinese government building in Nantong city of Jiangsu, China.

Yanzhou county, Jining city, Shangdong province:

A Chinese government building in Yanzhou county of Jining city of Jiangsu, China.

Shijiazhuang city, Hebei province:

A Chinese government building in Shijiazhuang city of Jining city of Hebei, China.

Anyang city, Henan province:

A Chinese government building in Anyang city of Henan, China.

Tonglin city, Anhui province:

A Chinese government building in Tonglin city of Anhui, China.

Linyi city, Shandong province:

A Chinese government building in Linyi city of Shandong, China.

Honghe city, Yunnan province:

A Chinese government building in Honghe city of Yunnan, China.

Sishui county, Shandong province:

A Chinese government building in Sishui county of Shandong, China.

Changxing county, Huzhou city, Zhejiang province:

A Chinese government building in Changxing county of Huzhou city of Zhejiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Changxing county of Huzhou city of Zhejiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Changxing county of Huzhou city of Zhejiang, China.

A Chinese government building in Changxing county of Huzhou city of Zhejiang, China.

Fuyang city, Anhui province:

A Chinese government building in Fuyang city of Anhui, China.

Loudi city, Hunan province:

A Chinese government building in Loudi city of Hunan, China.

A Chinese government building in Loudi city of Hunan, China.

A Chinese government building in Loudi city of Hunan, China.

Hongjiang city, Hunan province:

A Chinese government building in Hongjiang city of Hunan, China.

A Chinese government building in Foshan city of Guangdong, China.

A Chinese government building in Weifang city of Shandong, China.

Comments from Mop:

人在疯语中:

A common problem in the Heavenly Kingdom. If the money spend building these luxurious vanity projects were used on the parts of the population that have been forgotten or on the lives of the peasants/farmers, what would things be like [for the country] now?

雪碧超人:

Pretty good, there’s nothing inappropriate, would you rather all of them work in single-story offices so they would appear simple/modest?

zgh330356706:

Good buildings! China is truly strong and powerful.

月落之蓝:

I really don’t understand why government buildings are constructed to look like the White House [look so extravagant]? No one is going to praise you as being impressive, they will only say you are corrupt. If you’re going to construct something, first construct/fix the Project Hope schools, hospitales, and roads, and then naturally the ordinary common people will praise you. I really don’t know what these leaders are thinking. The one in our town doesn’t even have 100 workers, yet it occupies 1/3 of the entire town, the large building is the absolute best in the entire town. So disgusting.

月落之蓝:

Grass mud horse, in other countries, some of the government offices are rented, good enough if they can be used, so why fucking make them this big for? So one person can use 5 offices? Grass mud horse.

名字长不是我的错:

Ding, [the government buildings are] pretty much the same everywhere [throughout China].

win102102:

Would you be satisfied if the government’s buildings were really poor and rundown??

LoveHottie:

No matter much hardship there is going on, the leaders must not be allowed to suffer hardship. No matter how poor people are, the leaders must not suffer poverty!
Let some get rich first, then eradicate those who cannot get rich, to finally achieve common prosperity!

Motherfucking CP! (Communist Party)

欠女幽魂:

If America saw this, it’d even feel ashamed/inadequate…

九龙论剑:

Everywhere these office buildings are the best buildings in the entire city, so full of power and grandeur, that people are even afraid to get near them.

Which one do you like best?

A Chinese government building in Fuyang city of Anhui, China.

So full of power and grandeur. Personals @ chinaSMACK.

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  • carny

    love China, peace to japan at this time people.

  • rickeh

    whoa. wuxi’s building is amazing. I’ll check that out when there in a few weeks :D

  • Michael

    To me it is not the cost of these buildings that is the real shame. Quality in architecture often takes money and quality architecture can be a point of pride for a city. A lot of these buildings are just big, not hugely expensive. What is nasty is the fact that these buildings’ purpose is just to create awe–and be cut off from the people. The building is placed within a megablock, and a sea of grass and parking is like a moat.

    Some buildings are both insanely big and insanely expensive. I have been in the largest of the buildings shown, The city hall in Wuxi. Designed by some foreign firm (German, I think) with attention to detail in materials. Leaders seriously will be taking a car to get from one end of the building to another. It is that big. Digging the foundation created so extra earth much they used it to create a hill for fengshui behind the center,

  • PeterScriabin

    Can anyone confirm that the Fuyang, Anhui pics are genuine?

    The Greco-Roman architecture is totally different than the linear designs of all the others, and looks more like (but even better than) what you might see in San Francisco. The grounds also look very impressive for such a relatively small city as Fuyang.

    In general, of course, the phenomenon alluded to here is one of the more disgusting aspects of Chinese government, and it might surprise (and delight) some here on CS to see that the Netizens are well aware of it, and don’t like it one little bit.

    • Anonanon

      I don’t see why architecture must be limited to a country’s own style.

      In fact, if a Chinese govt building has Greco-Roman architecture, this may imply that the architect for the building was from overseas (which in turn means more cash was spent).

      • Kong

        Housing structure in China has tended to be more utilitarian, but due to a need to urban development, China has been a gold mine for foreign architects who can pretty much build whatever they want as long as it complies with some very lax standards.

        A lot of local architecture is “foreign”.

    • Mercator

      It’s a real building see here: http://www.life.com/image/73334519

      I think the second picture of it is just an artist’s impression.

      • PeterScriabin

        Thank you. I think the 愤青 would agree, it’s an interesting link.

        The building, whose design is meant to be a cross between the White House and Capitol Hill, has caused much controversy as it cost more than 30 million yuan ($3.85 million) to build while the annual fiscal income of the local district barely reaches 100 million yuan ($12.8 million).

  • Bo Wang

    Why bother labeling themselves communist? About as dumbass as dictatorships calling themselves democratic, e.g. DPRK.

  • Fman

    It’s funny how when you talk to locals about the poor, sick, lack of good medical care, retirement funds, any short coming of the government they always say “China is a developing country” then you see gross and excessive waste (not to mention the cars and houses owned by the government officials, do the math, how much do they make? how can they afford the things they have??)

  • Chad

    And you’d bet that if the buildings were plain janes, people would be complaining about superior foreigner buildings and the shame that the government brings to China lol

    Chinese netizens honestly whine about the most frivolous things. Shouldn’t they be complaining about the crazy pollution everywhere?

    • Fauna

      Why do you think we do not? We complain about that too.

      • Chad

        Yet it has not improved in the last decade. The green movement in China is very weak so let’s not pretend otherwise. In China you can get jailed for making any sort of real effort to force real change things for the better. That’s why you see all these netizens whining about frivolous crap.

        • Kong

          Nothing netizens complain about ever changes unless they complain about one person not worth much to the establishment. That doesn’t stop them from complaining about everything.

        • Fauna

          I think you are wrong. There is more concern about pollution now than 10 years ago by Chinese people and the Chinese government. This is a good thing. I did not pretend that the green movement in China is not very weak but I believe it has improved. I do not know why you are so aggressive. You complained about Chinese netizens whining about frivolous things and ask why they don’t complain about pollution. I replied to you that we do. The truth is that everyone in the world whines about frivolous things. We should not pretend otherwise, right? In recent years, the government has paid more attention to Chinese netizens and Chinese netizens have successfully used the internet to get attention and action for many problems in Chinese modern society like corruption and injustice. I do not think you are being fair. There are 400 million Chinese netizens. Some can whine about frivolous things all the time while others do not. Most of them can whine about frivolous things and not frivolous things at the same time. Moreover, I do not think showing how government buildings are so excessive even in poor areas is a frivolous complaint.

        • http://nikiwonoto.com Niki

          Time for Revolutions, anyone?
          Like what happened in Middle East now.

  • ShanghaiSteve

    The air quality in most of the examples is terrible. I believe that every example from Shandong showed thick pollution.

    I agree with Michael. Many of these buildings are surrounded by very nice greenery, but are inaccessible except for cadres and the minimum wage gardeners.

    • http://baihaifeng.blogspot.com Dr. Jones Jr.

      Except Tai’an. Funny, the picture of it looks exactly the same as the day I passed by on the bullet train to Beijing.

  • wallimo

    The government buildings in china are Romanesque, and they are well made, unlike a lot of other buildings these government offices won’t collapse in a Earth quake!

  • http://www.facebook.com/kedafu Kedafu

    Song of the Article

    Stuck in the Middle
    -Stealers Wheel

    五毛党

  • diverdude

    Nice architecture and all that, but I had the same question as the other reader- do they really have that many employee’s that they need such large office buildings ?
    If so, I guess bureaucracy is a BIG biz in The Middle Kingdom !

    • diverdude

      oops, employees

    • http://baihaifeng.blogspot.com Dr. Jones Jr.

      When you’re talking about the country that more or less invented bureaucracy, currently in quasi-communist flavor, aren’t you just stating the obvious?

      I would guess that these buildings need a lot of space for all the filler employees who had to be hired because their family had the right guanxi. Of course, if they’re anything like other Chinese government structures I’ve been to, plenty of the rooms are empty… slowly being filled with paper waste.

  • Josephus Flavius

    1. Would these buildings withstand a 9.0 earthquake?
    2. How many of these offices are empty?
    3. Mianzi is a mental disease.

    • CHNinUSA

      I agree with 2 and 4 with you, but I do believe 1 is true, the most stable building in China is believed to be the gov’s, in stead of the school. For the thought of gov is like “Come on! the first priority in China now is to protect the gov officers. For the grass roots, just let them save for their own, it is already good enough that they don’t die for hunger, they should appreciate the gov!”

  • Kong

    Looks like old Chinese traditions are still around.

  • http://wanderingamericantravelblog.blogspot.com/ WanderingAmerican

    Wow. Those netizen comments are even more retarded than usual.

  • Foreign Devil

    The major cities in Canada also have large government buildings (Queen’s Park, Parliament etc. . . ) Of course nothing near this scale, but our population is only a fraction of Chinese population. So I guess by comparison it is not too terrible. .. Still. . both countries have bloated government, especially China. It works against a strong economy. Government is the most inefficient system. Private enterprises must be extremely efficient to survive. . but government has no such pressures.

  • Confucius says

    What is so special about this?

    State buildings in my country are also big like that or not bigger.

    Its even more justified considering that most city in China has more population than the whole Australia, I don’t see the surprise that these stupid netizens shows. I would even suggest to build bigger and grander, as more people are getting urbanise that means more local workers are required, that means in a long-term it doesn’t get obsolete, that means save money.

    Please go travel around the world, then complain, stupid mofos.

    • lol

      you’re forgetting that 95% of the world population doesn’t have something called “logic and reasoning”

    • really

      Your country? you sound Chinese, what’s your country? And please explain why government employees need such extravagant architecture; in my country, one of the richest in the word, they just need ordinary offices.

    • Alikese

      Most cities in China have more than 22 million people? I think you need to go back to your remedial math class.

  • Justin

    I work at people’s daily, which is the communist party’s main propaganda organ. We didn’t even have a completely paved parking lot when I started working here a year ago. So not all government buildings are so ostentatious. Now the CCTV building down the road….that’s a different story.

  • Tower of Babel

    FACE, the Chinese religion.

    • diverdude

      whoops, that nail just got hit on the head…

  • greater

    feel happy to see TAIAN’S govt. office pic here..i stayed there for 4.5 yrs..really awe inspiring….it miss it
    but i heard tht taian is the second last city in shandong province in every areas economically,natural beauty,transport etc.. how come this citie’s govt office can come in this list?

  • May

    Horrid architectural styles… I can see the influence of the soviet regime there and a bit of copying from neoclassical… what I can’t see is something throughly original or somewhat representative of Chinese culture. Waste of money

    • Alikese

      Not to mention that five years from now the buildings will be falling down, and the sides will have turned brown from smog.

  • Herbie

    Too busy talking to notice me lying on the SOFA

  • Xiao en

    Awesome, very beautiful buildings. How many people were employed building these buildings?? Are these structures going to vanish within the next 200 years?? doubtful. These are permanant assets to the country.

  • bomber

    more milk toast. intimidated by a DDOS attack?

  • http://www.matthewsawtell.com Matthew A. Sawtell

    So… there is a copy of the Capitol Building, complete with a statue of Mao on top, somewhere in P.R. China? {laughing} Too much. Just way too much.

    Cripes. I see a place like that getting torched in the next wave of Nationalism…

  • Jess

    Mmm…imposing Soviet-style architecture~ : )
    Honestly, most of these buildings are pretty ugly. Everything is so symmetrical!
    I’d like to see a close-up of Zhongnanhai, though. Apparently, a lot of the complex is actually underwater.

  • dude

    Those are some really huge and new structures. Government buildings in my country are old and smell of paperwork, ink and old wooden furniture. Here, it’s spotless windows and shiny spotless marbled floors.

  • KopyKatKiller

    Many of them remind me of “The Ministry of Love” from 1984.

    There are two main types. A square “1984”ish building, or copies of Roman architecture. Almost none have “Chinese Characteristics”, which says something… but what?

  • Eidolon

    Government buildings everywhere in the world are built to be symbols of power. What’s sad about most of these Chinese buildings however is that they show no taste. They’re just bloated corporate buildings.

    • red_five

      Neo-greco for sure, with an added dash of Soviet authoritarian architecture (all bow before the mighty government)

      But I agree – there is something very corporate about these designs.

      I’m far from objecting to quality and unique public buildings. I think it is an art that the West was once good at but has since fallen into cheap post-modern designs out of fear of tax issues.

      I don’t believe the torch has been passed to China though. These designs certainly are imposing and large but I feel little (if any) inspiration from them. Each showcased design is merely a poor modification of the last, they exist in vacuum and do not jive with the surrounding urban fabric nor is there anything particularly enduring or special about them. Suburban government architecture. Could be any Chinese city.

    • Alikese

      Well the local government owns most of the local corporations. It makes sense that a building that houses the Bureau of Statistics and the provincial cigarette company would meld public and private architecture.

  • Irvin

    China is a fuck or being fucked country. Get used to it.

  • Mechanized

    Mostly ugly and monolithic……. but imposing which I suppose is what they were going for.

  • Li Ruike

    What’s missing from each of these photos is the sexy, long-legged prostitutes coming and going. That’s the real business of these offices.

    How about another collection of photos of young women going through the gates to see if I’m right?

  • wontonsoupx

    communism blocks true human expression. hence the bland architecture. these buildings look old and outdated

    • 吴兰

      No worries. No matter how massive they are and no matter how much money was spent on them, after 15 years of no maintenance or just wrong maintenance (as is the custom in China), they will look just rundown. Within the next five they will be demolished and something else will be built to replace them. It’s the Chinese way to boost the GDP. Can you show me ANY picture of ANY building of THIS scale that was built after 1912 in China and that still looks good? The Capitol, the White House etc were constructed to last for ages. In modern China it’s the build-demolish-build-boost the GDP attitude.

  • Kning

    I have never been to Shuozhou city, Shanxi province, and yet: I have seen that building a hundred times during my time in China. Each and every time in a different city.

    There are some interesting buildings popping up in China, but those are not really in these pictures.

  • James

    The Changsha building is the provincial office building.

    Nothing compared to the municipal government buildings! They are just massive and there are like 6 or 7 of them spread out over a very large area.

    lol you would think that the provincial government would need more office space than the city government

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  • Bolle45

    Könige haben schon immer schöne Schlösser gebaut und dem Volk die Lebesgrundlage weggenommen, warum sollte es hier anders sein? Auch waren die Berates der Könige überall korupt und unterschlugen das Geld des Volkes und hielten sie arm und dumm. Irgendwann wird das Volk aufstehen und sich gegen diese Ausbeuter stellen.

  • Dave

    What a waste of money!!!!!!!!!

  • nasta

    There is a mistake with some of the photos. The one that is labeled Ruichang, is not Ruichang. The one below it that is labeled unknown is Ruichang.

  • cdn icehole

    “Which one do you like best?”

    None.

  • dilladonuts

    Good for them, do whatever you like with your money. Don’t let a bunch of broke foreigners opinions get to you. They are just upset that you have the money to throw away while they are working some laborious lame job hoping to strike rich.

    • 吴兰

      “Do whatever you like with your money” – well, I agree to an extent but not in the context of government spendings it’s a terrible thing to say. This money comes from the pockets of the local populace and some of these buildings stand in places where thousands of parents can’t properly feed their children and/or send them to school. If they have money to throw away then I’d say gaining mianzi this way is not the best way to do it. As for a bunch of broke foreigners working laborious lame jobs hoping to strike rich – I hope you’re speaking for yourself. I don’t think I belong to thus described category.

  • Jay

    These will make nice hotels someday – when the people evict the current residents.

  • Li Ruike

    Did you see the story about the Kama Elementary School in Japan and how the town was washed away but the school stood. The children are waiting for their parents. Compare the construction of the Japanese schools with those of China. Who loves their children more? I think it’s obvious.

  • udl..

    Fuyang city one is crazy.. were they trying to build the white house or sth..

  • R. Walsh

    Peter Scriabin,

    The Fuyang pix are genuine. There is a similar US capitol building style district HQ in Jiangning district, Nanjing. Everyone coming into the city for the first time mistakes it for the Jiangsu provincial capitol, or maybe the KMT-era capitol of China.

  • Sunshine

    So my dad took pictures of the government building in his home town, which honestly is a tiny tiny TINY place and what used to be a rural area not so long ago. The government buildings are humongous and so grandeur that you would be able to sense the excessiveness from kilometers away. The rest of the town is seriously under developed I won’t even begin.
    Anyway, so he took the pictures, uploaded them on the Chinese Wiki article about the town, and captioned it something along the lines of “A show of corruption”. It didn’t get taken down until several days later I was impressed!
    The point of the story is: My dad’s first internet trolling was a success!

  • Joe

    What is it with China building European style buildings? They don’t look good because they are out of their natural environment, Europe.

    However, the other buildings seem to have faint touches of Chinese styling, namely the massive squares and symmetrical designs.

  • pug_ster

    Probably less than 10% of the buildings went really over the top. However, I think that since price of manpower is so cheap and cost of materials to build it is probably just a little more, I’m sure that these government buildings are built for just a little more than an utilitarian one.

  • http://www.foarp.blogspot.com FOARP

    Just can’t get over the fact that pretty much every one of these buildings is bigger than London City Hall (i.e., the office which runs the government of London, the largest city in Western Europe):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_City_Hall

    Most of these buildings are bigger even than the Houses of Parliament and Whitehall combined, and these are centres of government for the entire UK. This despite each building being seemingly a county-level centre of governance.

    It’s simply weird to see commenters saying “would you rather they worked in a modest one-storey building?”, how could anyone answer that with anything but “yes”?

    • dilladonuts

      so what if its bigger then london city hall? get over yourself and your nationality. when’s the last time you’ve done something to help out society. sucks to be the have nots doesn’t it, jealousy is a bitch/female trait.

      • BigCAD

        Who was the first nation the Japanese called for aid? Who is having to play world police whilst China wags its finger but abstains from voting? Who is pulling off an Olympics which isn’t one huge face exercise? Sure as hell ain’t the dalu ren; Get over yourself and your nationality you can break the inferiority complex.

  • http://www.foarp.blogspot.com FOARP

    Things missing in the pictures:

    1) The fleet of black Audis with 军 plates to carry the officials around.

    2) The army of ernai to serve their every carnal need.

    3) The millions of gallons of green tea swilled by government officials everyday in days of doing pretty much nothing.

    4) The millions of computers on which solitaire is played the entire day in each office.

    5) The horde of businessmen beating a path to the door of each office to pay bribes and back-handers.

    6) The thousands of farmers forced off their land with low compensation so that these buildings could be built.

    7) The millions of children and poor people who could have received education and healthcare with the money spent on these ridiculous monstrosities.

    • PeterScriabin

      Brilliant and witty encapsulation of the truth. Over at the Grauniad and the Economist, hack journalists are making hundreds of quid for far less pithy summaries.

      If only you could get it translated and posted on the front pages of China Daily and Global Times, maybe under the heading: “An open letter to the CCP.”

  • Bob

    Truly ugly buildings.

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