Chinese Video Websites Halt Buying of Japanese Anime

Japanese manga/anime covers, in a Sina Weibo post reporting that Chinese video site licensing of Japanese anime has come to a halt following recent Chinese government policy.

From Sina Weibo:

@财经网: Youku, iQiyi and Other Video Websites Halt Buying Foreign TV Shows — Presently, the purchase of all TV shows from abroad, including those from the U.S., U.K., Korea, Japan, and Thailand, have virtually come to a halt. Affected even more than American and British shows are Japanese anime. Currently, 80% of the summer anime lineup to begin broadcasting in July have yet to sell licensing/broadcasting rights, and the fall anime lineup beginning in October has garnered even less interest.

Comments from Sina Weibo:

头痛脑壳晕:

Fuck. Another Cultural Revolution?

我为什么非要在ID里面加Jesse:

Banning or not banning actually makes little difference to real fans. If you ban [broadcasting on] a few video websites, as always, people can still find other ways to watch. The real pity is that these web portals went through a lot of difficulty to build awareness of copyrights [licensing rights, intellectual property rights] among internet users, and suddenly with a single ban from the government, we are put back to square one.

剪辑手:

One of the reasons China can’t become recognized by the world as a mature country is because of the instability of policy. Prior to the event, there is no weathervane, and after there is no explanation. In politics, what the government says, goes. Regardless of whether it is changes to economic, cultural, or political policy, the moment someone says something should be changed, it is changed, and legal institutions are just a fig leaf. 69 years ago it was like this, and today it’s the same. This situation truly makes those who work and live in this country unable to feel a sense of security.

江山成文:

“It doesn’t matter what base, low-class methods you use to hang and kill culture, I still won’t watch domestic trash! What I need is cultural food with spirit, with value, with attitude, with thought, and with culture, and I reject nauseating shit filled with lies, hypocrisy, brainwashing, shamelessness, and the lack of basic standards.

源泥:

The Cultural Revolution has begun…

Lydia晴娥:

We have the ability to distinguish right from wrong. We put up with censorship and deleting internet posts and we’ve stopped caring about not being allowed to use Facebook and Twitter. But blocking foreign TV from us? I want to ask you, on what basis? It’s no longer the the late-Qing dynasty period where the country is sealing itself off. Establishing dignity doesn’t come from reducing our worldview. I give you ten thousand dislikes.

晨风历历:

It’s a good thing I’ve already gotten to a point where I’m too busy to watch Japanese, American, and British TV and no longer follow anime now. If we used this amount of effort to crack down on the food safety issue, I believe in the future the number of cancer patients would be cut in half.

醬油鋪子的醬油君:

Great. Now we can keep our minds focused on watching Japanese devils getting ripped apart barehanded, Japanese devils being shot by curving bows, and Japanese devils being fried, steamed, and cooked.

大姐姐你吃纳豆加葱花吗:

Emulate North Korea, long live the Cultural Revolution!

FemSyvEn:

From now on, we’ll only be able to watch Xinwen Lianbo and Mabel Yuan.

Help us maintain a vibrant and dynamic discussion section that is accessible and enjoyable to the majority of our readers. Please review our Comment Policy »
  • ex-expat

    Par for the course with a shit-head government in power. 打倒共产党!

  • Zappa Frank

    and after americans sit-com even jap anime.. all for the sake of the sino-japan wars tv fictions I hope.

    my favorite comment:

    One of the reasons China can’t become recognized by the world as a mature country is because of the instability of policy. Prior to the event, there is no weathervane, and after there is no explanation. In politics, what the government says, goes. Regardless of whether it is changes to economic, cultural, or political policy, the moment someone says something should be changed, it is changed, and legal institutions are just a fig leaf. 69 years ago it was like this, and today it’s the same. This situation truly makes those who work and live in this country unable to feel a sense of security.

    • whuddyasack

      I like this one too.

      We have the ability to distinguish right from wrong. We put up
      with censorship and deleting internet posts and we’ve stopped caring
      about not being allowed to use Facebook and Twitter. But blocking
      foreign TV from us? I want to ask you, on what basis? It’s no longer the
      the late-Qing dynasty period where the country is sealing itself off.
      Establishing dignity doesn’t come from reducing our worldview. I give
      you ten thousand dislikes.

      China is just like an opened Pandora’s Box, full of despair and gloom. Yet the people who’ve made the comments represent hope. To speak with such wisdom and maturity at such tender ages reassures me that China’s future may not be so bleak after all and that things will improve. It might sound weird and corny, but they make me proud in a “hope for humanity restored” way.

      • Eileithyia

        The problem is China will find and jail those people who want to change or just speak their mind.

      • firebert5

        I hate to oppose an optimistic post, but they sound rather hopeless to me. They complain about the ills done in their country, but they either do nothing about it, or for the minority that actually does something, they are brought to a halt by the powers that be with relative ease. I kind of see the internet as a place where they are able to vent and release some of the pressure. Once that is taken away, then maybe they will need to find another outlet. Then maybe something big would happen, but any positives that come from some an event could only appear very long after the deed is done. Violent protest does not produce positive results in the short term. Not that I dislike a positive outlook mind you, just that someone is going to voice the opposite; might as well get it over with!

        • whuddyasack

          I understand haha. We always need to look at things from another perspective and I can agree with you. You raise some very good points, and their government does seem like a bully who would step on a child’s sandcastle every time he or she nearly completed it. Yet I think the youth commenting here are on the right track. That knowledge is already in their heart even when the world must be such a murky, cloudy place for them. It is important that they remain hopeful. To quote from Aristotle, “It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.”

  • Rick in China

    Wow, this netizen is pretty brutal:

    ““It doesn’t matter what base, low-class methods you use to hang and kill culture, I still won’t watch domestic trash! What I need is cultural food with spirit, with value, with attitude, with thought, and with culture, and I reject nauseating shit filled with lies, hypocrisy, brainwashing, shamelessness, and the lack of basic standards.”

    If a foreigner said this, they’d be ripped apart… ah, how I love the new young eyes-open youth with balls in China, preach brutha’!

    • nqk123

      power of the internet and www.

    • Ryo Saeba

      It’s too bad these people are far and few. If you catch people watching videos on their phones while out, they are usually watching some Chinese drama or Korean drama. While technically Korean drama is consider imported, their drama are pretty much nothing more then love triangles with different people. I suppose it’s still better then brain washing propaganda.

  • mr.wiener

    Do they even believe half of these lame-arsed directives and bannings they do is going to work? …If so I would like access to what ever they are smoking.
    You do not make soft power by banning and telling people what to watch read and think, you do this by cultivating a class of thinkers, artists and satirists. At this rate the best Chinese artists will all live outside of China.

    • Rick in China

      “At this rate the best Chinese artists will all live outside of China.”

      I think…that’s…….sorta the case……. already……. no?

      • Free Man

        It would be, if other countries would hand out visas AND if the chinese government would let them go. Take a look at Ai Wei Wei (OK, not really an artist imho), arrested in his own home and can’t leave when or to where he wants to go to.

        And even if they would be allowed to go, not everyone is able to leave his family behind to suffer the wrath of the local government for what he does abroad.

        • Surfeit

          Ai Wei Wei said he doesn’t want to leave China.

          • Don’t Believe the Hype

            he knows if he leaves chinese will just call him a foreigner

    • firebert5

      I’m curious to see how this and other actions from the current Politburo pan out. They seem to be testing the waters to see how far they can take their political power both domestically and abroad. My earlier guess was that it’s a reflection of Xi Jin Ping’s “bring the CCP back to its Marxist roots” sort of ideology. So far this seems to be the case, though it’s just a theory at this point on my part.

    • Teacher in China

      And like one astute Chinese commenter already said, all this does is undo the work they have been doing re: copyrights. Now everyone is just going to illegally download what they want to watch, so the government has accomplished nothing.

      • mr.wiener

        That isn’t the rogue hazelnut flavored is it? I thought it tasted like winter-melon tea 2/10.

    • Zhegezhege

      Hey Wiener,
      Fan here.
      I could be wrong but it’s possible that Beijing has decided that they won’t play the soft power game any more because they’ve realised that autocracies that heavily censor the press will always lose that game to the West. And it’s not as if soft power ever sustained dictatorships (including the gongchandang) anyway.

  • Rick in China

    It’s hard to know if, as a Chinese coworker of mine once told me, they’re picking the rice out of the shit, or have picked the shit out of the rice.

    • firebert5

      It’s really hard to know when you do it in the dark.

  • Germandude

    Ah yes, land of the free, home of the… ah, no, mixed that up…

  • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

    Like everything else that is banned, outlawed or censored; this will only increase demand.

    Holding it just out of reach makes anything so much more enticing. So unless China is planning it’s own line of magical girls, and giant robots fighting monsters/each other, this is probably going to backfire on them.

    • Ryo Saeba

      This will only increase torrent traffic.

  • commander

    China’s biggest source of power is a measure to ban importation.

    As the Chinese economy account for a bigger proportion of the global economy and a growing number of countries depends on China’s demand for imports for their economic vitality, the import ban measure carries significant influences.

    Many Japanese consider a beefed-up naval forces in China as a threat to disputed island Senkaku under Tokyo’s control, but Japan’s increasing reliance on Chinese consumers for economic growth poses a much more grave challenge to Japan’s future.

    Japan’s declared intention to join the negotiations for the Trans Pacific Partnership should be seen as efforts to counteract China’s growing clout on the Japanese economy.

    But, at a time when even the United States sees China as the key engine driving global economic growth, Japan’s pursuit to distance itself from Chinese economy could be a significant policy misstep.

    Given the enormous potential for growth in China, Japan needs to devise a plan to take advantage of China’s market, and secure a superior position there.

    • whuddyasack

      Very interesting points made and a pleasant read. I’d also like to point out that China isn’t the only growth area that the world can rely on. Others include Vietnam, Indonesia, Myanmar and the Philippines. Someday, India and the rest of SE, NE and Central Asia would become growth areas as would all the nations in Africa.

      Given the enormous potential for growth in China, Japan needs to devise a plan to take advantage of China’s market, and secure a superior position there.

      And I’m sure they will. After all, these peoples have been trading and interacting with each other for more than a thousand years. As Niwa once said, Sino-Japanese relationships extend beyond mere neighbors, and even beyond married couples. They are in a marriage where divorce is impossible and will eventually have to learn to live with each other. The world is interconnected and I’m sure there will come a day when peace on Earth isn’t just a faint dream.

    • Zhegezhege

      Delusional nonsense.

    • niggaplz

      china’s household consumption is 35% of GDP, one of the lowest in the world. This means Chinese consumer has very weak demand, and china depend on the demand of US, Japanese and European consumers for Chinese goods for its economic growth.

      • commander

        You are wrong. Although Chinese consumption takes up about one third of China’s gross domestic product, the GDP represents the world’s second largest, meaning that comparison of purchasing power of the Chinese can needs to be made by actual numbers not a proportion of GDP.

        Second, China has exported intermediate goods to advanced nations, the United States and European countries, which in turn has shipped finished goods to developing countries including China.

        FYI, China is the great trading country for Japan and South Korea and other East Asian countries. Japan’s export industries hinge hugely on China’s burgeoning markets.

        China’s growing stature in the global economy is manifest after it injected $480 billion in economic stimulus in the middle of global economic recession which originated from the US in 2008, offsetting steep declines in consumption of those advanced countries and assisting the world economy from emerging expeditiously out of the Great Recession.

        China’s growing stature in the global economy is without doubt and a fait accompli at present.

    • Dr Sun

      China is the “key engine” driving economic growth, how and for whom ?

  • Zen my Ass

    Ill-fated attempt to limit external influences… too easy to attract foreign investments to make quick bucks and to keep everybody at bay by limiting their movements…

  • Surfeit

    What’s Anime?

  • Jahar

    I’m surprised how rational most of the comments are.

  • filabusta

    Wow, every single comment is insightful and critical of government policy… I guess those who feel strongly enough to comment on this issue are younger more open-minded netizens.

  • GREAT…..now how am I supposed to buy Bukkake cartoon magazines and tentacle anime porn?

    • Surfeit

      What is ‘buy’?

  • lonetrey / Dan

    How i imagine yhis going down at the CCCP office:

    “What’s that? The people are starving for real sustenance? (Foreign shows)”

    “Ahh it’s ok! Let them eat cake! (domestic TV)”

    • Surfeit

      Très bien!

    • firebert5

      Xi is the queen. (It’s best when read aloud!)

  • Dr Sun

    Sums it up

    妈的 要文革了是吧?

    文化大革命开始了 …

    太好了,可以安安心心的看手撕鬼子,弯弓射鬼子,煎炸蒸煮鬼子了

    good thing everyone has a VPN

  • whuddyasack

    I may no longer watch anime, but I feel that banning anime has a greater impact than banning The Big Bang Theory. Unlike BBT, anime plays a much bigger role in the lives of Chinese children and youth and I find that Chinese youth/pop culture is very much influenced by Japan and Korea. At a time when relationships between the two nations have cooled, Japanese pop culture is a very important bridge that connects both peoples without even having them meet. I don’t think the ban is going to hold though. Most Chinese watched anime and I think almost all of them can remember growing up with Doraemon and there are even festivals to celebrate the loveable little Japanese character, among others. Bans like this have come and gone, but they’ve never been permanent. I think the CCP have underestimated the power of anime! ;-)

    • Jahar

      The CCP doesn’t want that influence. It makes it hard for them to teach hatred.

      • whuddyasack

        True, their sole method of dealing with outside soft power is through banning.

    • SonofSpermcube

      100 million surplus men, and they’re cutting back on the flow of jackoff fuel. This will be remembered as one of the worst ideas in the history of ideas.

  • Ryo Saeba

    Guess they consider bouncing cartoon boobs and cartoon up-skirts porn.

  • FYIADragoon

    I don’t think I’d have much of a problem seeing a beauty like Mabel Yuan, as long as the show she was in wasn’t crap.

  • Danny

    Ban of Japanese anime equals CCP scared of Girls und Panzer and Kantai Collection

    • firebert5

      Well, some of them are legitimately scary…

  • Markus Peg

    A Chinese comment above shares the exact same view as myself. (I don’t care for anime but freedom to watch what you want should allow you the choice).

    Quote – “Banning or not banning actually makes little difference to real
    fans. If you ban [broadcasting on] a few video websites, as always,
    people can still find other ways to watch. The real pity is that these
    web portals went through a lot of difficulty to build awareness of
    copyrights [licensing rights, intellectual property rights] among
    internet users, and suddenly with a single ban from the government, we
    are put back to square one.”

  • Charles

    Pardon my french but – what the fuck is the Chinese government doing?

    Is this just a power play to let the masses know they have no power in determining the details of their own lives?

    I wonder what’s going to be next.

    • Insomnicide

      They want to build up consumption of domestic media and direct the money into their pockets. Of course, they don’t realize the best way to do that is to make good shows rather than banning good shows.

      • SonofSpermcube

        Hey, it worked for the domestic internet industry. Hell, they even got some actual good websites out of it, ones which would have been strangled in the cradle if they’d had to compete with unrestricted foreign sites.

        • Insomnicide

          But those websites themselves were given a bit of creative freedom for that to happen. Something that’s not happening right now with TV shows.

          Movies on the on the other hand, have been quite liberal and generous. But then again, movies are for both the domestic and international market while TV shows remain strictly a domestic consumption.

  • Boris

    Usually there is one good anime out of ten, the other nine are made to fill in the ‘needs’ of the fans. With Chinese shows (Mainland to be precise) there are 100 shows and if you are lucky, only one would be bearable. Anime has to decline a lot more for it to fall to the standard of Chinese shows.

    • Insomnicide

      ” Anime has to decline a lot more for it to fall to the standard of Chinese shows.”

      I don’t know man, those pedo incest shows aren’t looking any better.

  • Ralph Wiggim

    Seems like the Chinese people are losing their freedom quickly. Is there a tie-in to the CCP trying to steal all this land from their neighbors while minimizing what little rights the Chinese people have these days?

  • Ke Da Fu

    Song of the Article

    Cowboy Bebop

    OST Vol.1

    五毛党

    • zn

      they better not fucking ban cowboy bebop

  • 司马迁

    The truth is that Japanese are much more willing to deal and do business with Chinese that with Indians. They gave up dealing with Tata after years of trying.

  • Insomnicide

    Everyone in China already torrents their anime anyway, what’s this going to do to stop people from watching anime?

  • Insomnicide

    “contain Chinese imperialism”? Expand American imperialism more like.

  • The only country with a strong fascist bent today is China. Go look up what Fascism means before trying to come back with a rebuttal. Tell me if what propaganda elements are doing today in China doesn’t ring with fascism?

    What you call a pipe dream is actually very achievable. The rising costs of production in China has already forced some industries like apparel and furnishings out of the mainland. This is part of China’s evolution from being a low-end producer to a high-end producer. The effect will be that other countries like Cambodia, Vietnam, the Philippines, Thailand, will receive a greater share of foreign direct investment in the coming years.

    There are two possible outcomes then: if China’s relations with its neighbors do not improve, a wealthier ASEAN will surely find common cause in strengthening their partnership so as to counter what they see as an aggressive China. If China’s relations (esp with maritime disputes) are solved and Sino-ASEAN relations improve markedly, then the Asian dream becomes a beautiful one for everyone.

  • Wow. At least they’re not banning Japanese porn (not directly, at least)

  • Surfeit

    Don’t count your chickens just yet; I haven’t done any of those things, and I still turned out a pervert.

  • hehehehh

    Thanks to the internet, I can download anything I want anyways.

  • steviewah

    All it does is drive content down to the black market. This is not going to prevent anybody from accessing outside content.

    The real problem with the China’s entertainment industry is there is so much red tape. They can only produce movies or shows that are non-controversial and because of that it really inhibits creativity. If the film industry were allowed to produce films based on events like Tiananmen Square, government corruption, or Mao Zedong dark history people will watch. Oliver Stone put it best that China needs to stir up past issues by creating films that challenge conventional wisdom. A nation and its inhabitants can’t grow if they sheltered.

    • Dr Sun

      Who is being “sheltered” ?

      • steviewah

        I was referring to Chinese citizens being sheltered via censorship.

        • Dr Sun

          I don’t think it’s really the ordinary Chinese citizens who are being sheltered (protected) do you ?

        • Dr Sun

          you need to reverse your thinking, censorship is not to shelter the ordinary people, but to protect those who feel censorship is good for them.

Personals @ chinaSMACK - Meet people, make friends, find lovers? Don't be so serious!»