Toxic Sodium Chloride in KFC & McDonald’s Fries, Chinese Reactions

French fries.

Currently the third most popular post of the day on Chinese microblogging platform Sina Weibo…

From Sina Weibo:

@黑化_番長: KFC and McDonald’s French Fries Tested to be Poisonous/Toxic [衰] — Through laboratory testing by authorities, McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried Chicken’s french fries were both determined to contain sodium chloride (which is potentially toxic). Among them, KFC has 390mg/100g, while McDonald’s has 360mg/100g. The report says long term consumption of low amounts of sodium chloride will result in such symptoms as hydrophila, migraines, and breathing difficulties, as well as chest pains and increased heartbeats. #Is This The Cue to Say Goodbye to French Fries??!!#

Sodium chloride and trans-fat content of KFC and McDonald's french fries (medium size).

Sodium chloride and trans-fat content of KFC and McDonald’s french fries (medium size).

From Sina Weibo:

果酱爱吃甜柠檬:

Sodium chloride is just salt, okay? What restaurant’s french fries doesn’t add salt? And about hydrophila and such symptoms, that’s just thirst, so just drink some more water… This news/information sure is drunk [bullshit]… According to relevant investigations, glass and rocks contain large amounts of silicon dioxide and excessive contact can result in situations of accidental injury, with a high probability of blood loss, skin wounds, scratches, and other symptoms. The public is advised to be cautious in their use… [拜拜]

-NaHCO3:

In summary, fries are too salty.

朱宇炜Blackie:

Actually, the most toxic is still OH2, and I strongly urge the government and relevant departments to bring it under strict regulatory oversight!

真的小鱼妈妈:

My kitchen has a jar of sodium chloride all year long, with as much as 500 grams. Will I be criminally charged with possession of poison? [吃惊][吃惊][吃惊]

大颗粒豆子:

“A curved hook to catch fish, a straight hook to catch turtles.”

阿岛呀:

Hahahahahahahahahahaha stupid cunt, are you thirsty from salty foods?

奈何桥边卖汤人_:

Yup, a lot of restaurants in China all seem to use this kind of chemical additive to make food taste better. Sigh, Chinese people’s lives sure are worthless~

JohnCoun_Bth:

What do we do?!! Turns out KFC’s fries are this much saltier than McDonald’s!!!

林逢夏:

So frightening! Sodium chloride. I’ve personally seen how snails will definitely die if they touch too much sodium chloride, and leeches too. Too scary! Especially some fishes, if they touch too much sodium chloride, they’ll become dried corpses! My god! Too horrifying. It’s definitely a preservative/antiseptic!

张_金建:

Your mom, sodium chloride exceeding [regulatory] limits? OH2 must’ve entered your brain.

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  • Don’t Believe the Hype

    Is it a coincidence that all these “reports” are coming out about American fast food chains in China recently, or is this another attempt to make foreign brands look bad and domestic ones good?

    • Honibaz

      Actually it’s to remind Chinese citizens that regardless of where they eat and what they eat, their health is screwed.

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        True, so does that mean the China Dream is to not die at a Dicos?

        • Kai

          I quite like their fried chicken. It’s that salt & pepper MSG powder that makes it so damn good. HANDGUN!

        • Honibaz

          The China Dream is to move out of China.

    • Surfeit

      Which domestic brands look good here?

      • Don’t Believe the Hype

        I guess what I am saying is it appears to be a weak attempt to make foreign brands look worse if not just as bad as domestic ones (I wasn’t really asking, i can’t believe that this kind of non-story would be published for any other reason).
        Again, who the hell goes to McDonalds or KFC to get food expecting it to be healthy?? I once saw an option for a fried starfish (we looked it up and there was a hodgepodge of crazy non-fish ingredients) at KFC in Sichuan. In my experience (beijing, chengdu, nanjing, xi’an, etc) almost nobody thought this food was good for you to begin with

        • mr.wiener

          I go there for the bathrooms.

          • Dr Sun

            yours knees not what they used to be ?

          • mr.wiener

            True.

        • Surfeit

          Aye, if it looks like crap, it probably is crap.

    • Free Man

      WARNING: SARCASM AHEAD!!!

      It’s ChinaSmack trying to make chinese netizens look like they hate western products/companies. They frequently bring news like this!!!!

    • Ale Jandro

      Prob…

  • Hold your fire, chinaSMACKERS. I imagine this article was comparable in intent to articles in the Anglophere about “dihydrogen oxide”––i.e., a parody of recent overzealous health scares.

    Unfortunately, there are enough stupid people in the world who will read the headline––and perhaps even the entire article––and decide to commit themselves to avoiding McDonald’s/KFC fries or dihydrogen oxide.

    • mr.wiener

      I get it. A masterful piece of trolling, but is it even trolling? Is it a satire intended to get the credulous and jingoistic to rise to the bait or just fooling?
      Good one at any rate.

      • Kai

        Hard to say if the original poster was himself fooled or just forwarding on the joke. It’s just some random user who doesn’t have very many followers. If it was a Chinese media outlet where the likelihood of them playing such a prank on their huge follower counts is slim, then it’d increase the odds of someone having been a gullible/ignorant idiot.

        • NightKnight

          Kai, you should follow the story, Cui yongyuan rises to the bait, who is a famous talk show host working at CCTV and recently turning into an anti-GMO activist, it’s kind of the whole point of this baiting prank, mocking the fear-mongers about food safety but know nothing about science.

          • Kai

            LoL, oh really? Do you have a link? There’s always a sucker!

          • NightKnight

            http://weibo.com/1496852380/Bf7Trlprv top comments below are hilarious.

          • Kai

            Jesus Christ, I just looked through his subsequent posts about it too. Such tortured attempts to play it off. I love how the netizens don’t let him go on any of those posts, though I guess I’ll say I’m slightly impressed he’s left it all up instead of cowardly deleting it all (or he may genuinely think he’s been wronged or that his efforts to play it off are convincing enough… hard to say, the guy is kinda slippery).

            This would’ve been really bad if CCTV itself reshared it, kinda like The People’s Daily (?) and The Onion. Hosts themselves being gullible/ignorant idiots aren’t that new, but still pretty embarrassing. I like how everyone feels bad for Fan Zhouzi in the comments. LoL

    • Markus P

      Not to worry Matt there are plenty of other reasons why Junk/Fast food restaurants should be avoided.

    • x1sfg

      Dihydrogen monoxide is not a joke. It’s gaseous, liquid, and solid. In other words, it can’t be stopped. There’s no known cure.

      • Scientists are working on a cure:

        • x1sfg

          touche…

          except that there’s not enough silica gel packets aren’t as prevalent as dihydrogen monoxide. Think of the children!

    • Xio Gen

      Judging from the comments on Weibo, I think they all got that too.

  • Free Man

    It said: “Currently the third most popular post of the day on Chinese microblogging platform Sina Weibo…”.

    I wonder what the first 2 were. But hey, at least I learned the meaning of sodium chloride.

    • David

      Well, the African plane crash said it was the number two story.

  • Surfeit

    In other news, the sun is bright and hot.

    • Irvin

      Don’t forget water is wet.

      • lacompacida

        And people die from water too. Either making your breathing difficult, or too much will make your electrolyte level too low and your heart stops. Water is poisonous.

    • lacompacida

      And dangerous to your health to. People do die from sun light, either slowly (years), or quickly (days).

    • Dick Leigh

      Breaking news: Sun exposure causes cancer!

      In other news, lack of sun exposure causes cancer!

  • wes707

    Might buy some long-term YUM and MCD puts…

  • Science Patrol

    I will gladly die for a McDonald’s fry.

    • lacompacida

      Is it “die for” or “die of” ?

      • Irvin

        He first dies for it and then he dies of it.

  • Germandude

    Oh. Fast Food is unhealthy? Thank god I am only eating in the local restaurants…

    • Ale Jandro

      You are safe now!

  • Kai

    Satire? It’s quite prevalent in Chinese media. Off the top of my head, I can’t think of a satire magazine or website in China like The Onion if that’s something you’re thinking of. I don’t think there are satire TV channels, only shows. Like the US, there’s a huge amount of satire online by Chinese netizens, making fun of this or that. A lot of comedy in Chinese TV shows, movies, and live performances (like xiangsheng skits/sketches on the Spring Festival Gala) involve a lot of satire, some of which you’d think the Chinese government might be sensitive about. There’s a lot of satire.

  • Stefan

    That’s why I never touch the fries from those brands…a burger is enough, isn’t it?

    • Germandude

      That’s like saying: “Crack is unhealthy, that’s why I just shoot heroine”.

  • lacompacida

    Read the lyrics of the PRC national anthem.

  • A Gawd Dang Mongolian

    Can’t find a clip so here’s a transcript of what I thought after reading that paragraph.

  • Markus P

    Anyone seen the media in Taiwan going on about Sabina Altynbekova from the kazakhstan volleyball team? It has made a small 1-2 paragraph story into full page spread with pictures because of her.

    • mr.wiener

      got a link?

      • Markus P

        I dono where the link was that i read but search her name

        Here is a youtube video

        • mr.wiener

          Thanks mate!

    • Teacher in China

      Nope, but I just looked up some pics – damn! WHat’s her story? She really looks Chinese. Chinese mother or father, Kazakhstani for the other?

      • Markus P

        I thought the same but she said both her mother and father are Kazakhstani…

        • Teacher in China

          That’s interesting. I wonder how common that is. It looks like there has to be Chinese in her bloodline somewhere. Might have to take a visit to Kazakhstan someday! ;)

          • Alex Dương

            I’m not an expert on Kazakhstan, but the country does border northern Xinjiang. That part of China used to be ruled by Mongol tribes. It doesn’t seem too surprising to me that some or even many Kazakhs won’t look too different from Chinese.

          • Teacher in China

            I guess I should have looked at a map before commenting – I forgot that it actually bordered China….
            But one thing I can say – she doesn’t look Xinjiangese.

      • Gene flow doesn’t stop at political borders. Many Kazakhs look like they could be “Chinese”. Of course, the Chinese aren’t the only East Asiatic people; the Mongolians have had quite a presence in the region, what with the whole “Mongol Empire” and all.

        There are also plenty of East Asiatic indigenous peoples north of Mongolia and China in Siberia (i.e., Northeast Asia). Given Soviet history, it wouldn’t be surprising if there were significant gene flow from Siberia to neighboring Soviet satellites like Kazakhstan.

        • Teacher in China

          Yes, that’s true enough. But in my experience seeing people from the regions to the west of China, they often look more like Xinjianese than Han and other types of Chinese. This girl looks like she was born in Beijing or something.

          • The part of Xinjiang/China that borders Kazakhstan is actually almost entirely majority Han. The only part of Xinjiang/China that borders Kazakhstan that isn’t majority Han is majority Qazaq/Kazakh. See attached image.

            http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cd/Xinjiang_nationalities_by_prefecture_2000.png/800px-Xinjiang_nationalities_by_prefecture_2000.png

            It’s also possible that she’s part Korean. In the late 1930s, thousands of Koreans in the Soviet Union were deported to Central Asia. Data suggests there are over one hundred thousand Koreans in Kazakhstan.

          • Teacher in China

            Well look at that. Interesting! Thanks for the info :)

          • Insomnicide

            I’m still quite surprised people don’t know that Kazakhs are ‘Asians’.

            Also Uyghurs are a different, unrelated ethnicity which cannot be compared to Han and Kazakhs.

  • vonskippy

    390mg/100g

    That’s nothing, seawater has around 35GRAMS per Liter so panic China, your entire coastline is surrounded by that dreadfully toxic NaCl.

    • Mateusz82

      Actually… it is pretty good advice to not consume seawater.

      • Zappa Frank

        in the waters around China NaCl is likely the last danger

    • tomoe723

      But that is something… it’s too salty. Imagine eating one of them fries 3 inches long. 39/100g is like 1 inch of what your eating is just salt. The whole box, a third is made of salt. I wonder if its an indirect cause used to curb the weighing process when serving these fries. I noticed that during preparation, the staff weighs them before putting them in those packets. In any case, I still wouldn’t eat those.

  • Jahar

    good ol NaCl. table salt. I was wondering why they tasted that way. now i know.

  • Yes!

    Many millions of Chinese should be dead by now from sodium chloride drips commonly prescribed by mainland hospitals for all manner of ills including colds.

  • JabroniZamboni

    Chinese and sarcasm do not mix.

  • Sydney Ma

    It does seem that airplanes and food are the new topics… wait, they are always talking about food.

  • JabroniZamboni

    This thread bores me. I now declare it to be about Chinese ladies trying to do “sexy poses” in a “bikini show”. They don’t know what a bikini is….sigh…..I had it out and everything, but now I have full out floppy udon in my hands.

    http://english.people.com.cn/n/2014/0722/c90782-8759071.html

    They need to have sex appeal classes in university. Or teach what a bikini is. With a little coaching the wiggly udon could became strong like bull. Chinese women are hot only when they don’t try to pose.

    • Ale Jandro

      They are the sexiest: shaved armpits!

      • JabroniZamboni

        I dunno. I’ve seen jungle pits here, but never been with a woman that has them.

        • pink panda

          you sight only focus on women in bikini or their armpits?
          what a dick head!

          • JabroniZamboni

            I am a dick head. When I look at pictures of women that are not my wife, I generally judge them based on personality and how many times they can bust out the “v for victory” gang signs.

            If you were offended by my post, a feminine razor is only 20 kwai.

            A bar of soap even less.

  • Teacher in China

    Nicely done!

    Damn, do the Dongbei’ers like their salty food. Holy crap sometimes I eat some traditional salty food here and it nearly melts my tongue off. Combine that with all the baijiu and smoking….. so healthy….

  • chucky3176

    So I guess McDonald’s has been doing too well in China. The government controlled media has to kick in to stop this (foreign companies making too much money in China). This has happened to every foreign company from every country, that does too well in China.

    • Dr Sun

      You mean likes of Mercedes, Range Rover, BMW, Porsche ,Ferrari, LV Gucci , Chanel,Coke, Armani,Hermes, Lady Gaga , Beyonce and the NBL , are not doing doing well by the Chinese ?

      • chucky3176

        If they didn’t already, they’ll get their turns in time eventually. Or are you going to deny this? Microsoft is getting their turn now, with the Chinese government targeting them, as well as messenger services Line and Kakaotalk have been blocked by Chinese government for two months now, with no explanation.

        • Kai

          Dude, it’s a bit rich for a Korean hypernationalist like yourself to be critical of government trade protectionism. Come on, Korea, really?

          That said, there definitely is protectionism in China and sometimes it’s more than a bit obvious. As for Line and Kakao, they can get in line behind Facebook and Twitter. Welcome to the suckfest.

          • chucky3176

            Look at the ease of doing business world ranking, buddy. And there’s a reason why Korea has an FTA agreement with just about every part of the world, while China has exactly none. Do you think that would even happen if Korea was on the same level of unprecedented dirty tactics as China has practiced?

          • Kai

            Did you see me argue that Korea is on the same level of unprecedented dirty tactics as China has practiced?

            No.

            That said, a lot of China’s dirty tactics have some of their precedents in Korea. If you can admit that this is true, then you can also admit that it’s a bit rich for a Korean hypernationalist to be critical of government trade protectionism.

            I have a specific point. Don’t substitute a stupid one for it. I acknowledgd yours, so do me the favor of acknowledging mine.

          • Chucky3176

            I don’t get it. How is it that Korean “hypernationalist” cannot be critical of government trade protectionism? I’m a nationalist, true, but I’m also proponent of free flowing trade. But before you replied to me for the first time, where did I even criticize China’s protectionism? All I did was point out that the facts that McDonald’s like many other foreign companies in China, probably didn’t do anything wrong. Is this not true? What is your problem with my statement? Because I pointed this out? It seems to me, you’re the one who is actually the hyper nationalist here with you jumping with hyper sensitive nationalism.

          • Kai

            It’s like a US hypernationalist being critical of other countries policing foreign/international issues.

            Can the US hypernationals be critical? Yes, of course he can, but he can’t escape looking hypocritical.

            The point isn’t that you can’t be critical, the point is that the resulting hypocrisy is irksome.

            You were being critical of China’s protectionism in your original comment (and subsequent one too).

            Protectionism is all about going after foreign companies seen as threats to the prospects of domestic companies.

            All I did was point out that the facts that McDonald’s like many other foreign companies in China, probably didn’t do anything wrong. Is this not true?

            No, it isn’t true. You can review your own comments. The crux of your characterization was not “[who] probably didn’t do anything wrong” but instead “making too much money in China” and “that does too well in China.”

            I made no argument over whether they did anything wrong. I made a point about trade protectionism, which is what “targeting foreign companies” because they “make too much money” or “do too well” too often is (the other half is to help domestic companies).

            It seems to me, you’re the one who is actually the hyper nationalist here with you jumping with hyper sensitive nationalism.

            No, you see me being critical of what looks hypocritical and mistakenly think I must be a Chinese nationalist because the target of your criticism was China. I, on the other hand, think you’re a Korean hypernationalist because that’s what your comment history has revealed about you. I’m not a Chinese nationalist, hyper or otherwise. Would a Chinese nationalist be so forthright in admitting the negative existence of Chinese trade protectionism and calling it a “suckfest”?

            I’m appreciative of you being honest about being a nationalist. My point is simple: It is uh “interesting” to see Korean hypernationalists be so critical of a government policy and behavior Korea itself is notorious for when it is being done by another country possibly affecting them. Hypocrisy is hypocrisy and it is always irksome. When Chinese nationalists are critical of US trade protectionism that negatively affects Chinese companies, they look incredibly hypocritical too.

          • chucky3176

            “My point is simple: It is uh “interesting” to see Korean hypernationalists be so critical of a government policy and behavior Korea itself is notorious for when it is being done by another country possibly affecting them. ”

            So one guy says something, now the entire country of Korea is guilty of criticizing China and being hypocritical? How does that work? How about I criticize China on the abusive human rights? The Chinese sending back of North Korean refugees? The Chinese support of North Korean regime? The 500 Chinese fishing boats that illegally fish in Korean waters everyday and kill Korean coast guards with picks and shovels? Is anybody allowed to criticize China on those, according to your standards?

          • Kai

            So one guy says something, now the entire country of Korea is guilty of criticizing China and being hypocritical?

            No… one person whom I consider to be a hypernationalist (you) is being hypocritical. Where did I ever say the entire country of Korea is being hypocritical (though it certainly can be)?

            How about I criticize China on the abusive human rights? The Chinese sending back of North Korean refugees? The Chinese support of North Korean regime?

            You can, but how would that respond to, much less refute, my suggestion that a Korean hypernationalist being critical of government trade protectionism is being hypocritical?

            Is anybody allowed to criticize China on those, according to your standards?

            I feel like you still don’t quite understand what I’m saying. What exactly do you think my “standards” about criticizing are and what did I say to introduce them?

            Let me try to steer this back to my point:

            Would a Japanese hypernationalist criticizing another country’s whaling policies (or insular ethnic policies/norms) appear hypocritical to you?

          • chucky3176

            Yes that would be hypocritical. But I have told you already that I am a free trader. I would be hypocritical if I had advocated protectionism. But I encourage you to go and look into my posting history and see if you can come up with a comment where I advocated protectionism of the kind that China is practicing. I even spoke up numerously about the leftist Koreans protesting the ‘US Mad Cow’ protests in 2008 as idiots who wanted preserve the Korean beef industry. Your fail in logic comes in because you have already made up your mind, not based on my comment because A) I’m Korean, B) because you think I’m a “hypernatioanlist” who will surely be protectionist in your mind.

          • Kai

            Yes that would be hypocritical.

            Great, then you understood my point.

            But I have told you already that I am a free trader.

            Yes, you have, after my initial comment.

            Your fail in logic comes in because you have already made up your mind, not based on my comment because A) I’m Korean, B) because you think I’m a “hypernatioanlist” who will surely be protectionist in your mind.

            Yep. I clearly presumed that if a hypernationalist is rarely critical of his own nation, and you’re arguably a hypernationalist based on your past comments, then you may very well be criticizing Chinese trade protectionism hypocritically because trade protectionism is a defining characteristic of Korean trade policy.

            You’re saying you’re a nationalist but you’re also a free trader, so I’m wrong. I have made the same mistake as assuming someone who is arguably a “conservative” is also likely “anti-abortion” when he may very well be a “conservative” who is “pro-choice” and I made a rash assumption. That’s on me. I apologize for being an idiot.

            You’re also right that while I recall tons of stuff that marks you as a hypernationalist, I don’t recall anything specific about your defending Korean protectionist trade policies (I’ve see a lot of your stuff but I don’t normally read kB/jC where you usually haunt). Therefore, I’m not going to be a bigger idiot and insist that you’re not a free trader. I’ll take your word for it until I have cause to question it.

            For now, I’m content to know that you do now understand what my line of thought was, and that it wasn’t anything as stupid as me criticizing you or Korea for merely being critical of China. I mistakenly assumed you as a hypernationalist would be protectionist when it comes to Korea and thus your criticisms of others was a sort of hypocrisy. You say I’m wrong, and without any evidence to the contrary, I am. Thanks for setting me straight.

          • chucky3176

            You’ve seen a lot of my stuff but you don’t normally read kB/jC where I usually haunt, but you are completely certain that I’m rarely critical of own nation. Are you sure about that?

            “trade protectionism is a defining characteristic of Korean trade policy.”

            I suggest you update your manual. protectionism is no longer a defining characteristics of Korean trade policy. That would be China and Japan. Look at China and Japan, how many FTA’s do they have? South Korea has 25 and increasing.

          • Kai

            You’ve seen a lot of my stuff but you don’t normally read kB/jC where I usually haunt, but you are completely certain that I’m rarely critical of own nation. Are you sure about that?

            Where do I say I am “completely certain” that you’re “rarely critical” of your own nation? You might be making the same transitive property fallacy I made the mistake of making.

            I suggest you update your manual. protectionism is no longer a defining characteristics of Korean trade policy.

            While I think Korea has arguably become less protectionist in some ways over time, Korea being characterized as historically protectionist was sufficient for the point I was making. Wasn’t it?

          • chucky3176

            We are talking about China on a Chinese forum, not Korea. Yet you’re the one who mentions Korea.

            I don’t get it. How is it that Korean “hypernationalist” cannot be critical of government trade protectionism? I’m a nationalist, true, but I’m also proponent of free flowing trade. But before you replied to me for the first time, where did I even criticize China’s protectionism? All I did was point out that the facts that McDonald’s like many other foreign companies in China, probably didn’t do anything wrong. Is this not true? What is your problem with my statement? Because I pointed this out? It seems to me, you’re the one who is actually the hyper nationalist here with you jumping with hyper sensitive nationalism.

          • Kai

            We are talking about China on a Chinese forum, not Korea. Yet you’re the one who mentions Korea.

            First, your reputation precedes you. Second, you can’t seriously be trying to use the “this site is about China so we can’t talk about anyone else” argument, are you? You, the one who regularly brings up Korea on jC and Japan on kB?

            See my previous reply to your other copy of this comment of yours for the rest.

          • chucky3176

            I don’t bring up regularly bring up Korea on JC and Japan on KB. I only comment on the subjects there, reply to Japanese comments on Koreans, or if someone else brings up Koreans. I don’t choose the Korean subjects, the mods do and the Japanese netizens. Go to JC, and about a third of the subjects and comments have something to do with bad Koreans in Japan. I exist, because they exist.

          • Kai

            I’m going to let others review your comments history to judge if there’s reasonable basis for my characterization of you bringing up Japan on kB and Korea on jC.

            That said, please don’t mistake me as saying you always irrelevantly bring these things up… JUST LIKE I don’t think I am being irrelevant when I find it ironic and somewhat hypocritical for a person I consider to be a well-known Korean hypernationalist that frequents our sites is being critical of government trade protectionism.

            My comment exists, because your comment exists. Do you understand the logic there? You react to what you see on kB and jC. I’m reacting to what I see here as well.

        • Dr Sun

          Microsoft’s getting picked on over withdrawing XP , line and kalaotalk i’ve never even heard of and nor has any Chinese person I’ve talk to, so they (whatever they are) must have been massive.
          However I think you miss the point, many brands, ie those I mentioned have never been doing better.
          Trade protectionism, every country does it from their respective energy policies, the common agricultural policy to Huawai being kicked out of the USA.

        • Zappa Frank

          to be fair Microsoft got similar problems also in the UE.

    • bang2tang

      I think it’s franchise operated by chinese?

    • M8

      It’s all politics. China is going to turn up the heat on foreign companies in future because of foreign countries shunning Huawei, ZTE, and other Chinese companies.

  • Qoaa

    Bring KFC 12 piece extra crispy buckets and McDonald’s Big Macs to Tibet!
    And bring the weed, we got peace to practice.

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