Surveillance Video Saves Good Samaritan From False Accusation

A Chinese good samaritan is wrongfully accused by an old man he helped.

Over 1.2 million views and 6400 comments since it was uploaded to popular Chinese video sharing service Youku yesterday…

From Youku:

Young man who helps fallen old man wrongly accused, traffic police view surveillance video proving his innocence

In Linyi city of Shandong province, a post-80s generation young man who helped an injured elderly person who was trapped under an electric tricycle due to a traffic accident was instead wrongly accused as the perpetrator. Fortunately, after the Hedong district police of Linyi city checked the surveillance footage of the intersection, the entire course of the young man’s good deed in aiding the old man was restored.

At 0:09 in the above video, an old man riding a motorized cart can be seen braking hard and falling forward off his seat due to a black Audi that pulled in front of him. The cart tips over and his leg is trapped underneath. As the black Audi continues driving down the street, a dark colored hatchback that witnessed the accident makes a U-turn and stops by the side of the road. A young man exits the vehicle, runs over, and helps lift the cart off the old man’s leg.

In Linyi, China, an old man falls off his electric three-wheeled motorcycle to avoid hitting a black Audi.

A young man in a small hatchback making a U-turn happens to see the old man on the ground, while the black Audi drives away.

The young man in the hatchback gets out to help the injured old man trapped under his overturned electric tricycle, while the black Audi is already far down the street.

Comments from Youku:

gx07730773:

I’m so upset, the citizens of our country…

xclz0011:

If there weren’t a surveillance camera…it’d be yet another… [case of a Good Samaritan being wrongly sued.]

边防⑤警:

Sigh, not going to say much, old man, may you die early.

し莪卟綄羙づ:

This old but won’t die person truly is an embarrassment, losing face for Linyi people, motherfucker.

卢晚来:

I say if this elderly person isn’t sentenced to prison, all people who have fallen can die and I still won’t help them.

Milakal:

This lousy old man probably wanted to run the red light!!!

ooolife:

Blatantly lying, for money, for a more comfortable life, right….?

飘…过:

Good people are still the majority, bravo for this young guy… If it were someone else, they wouldn’t even step on the brakes~~

看出好心情:

It is situations like this where you shouldn’t go help! What a headache!!!

seelansea:

1. If that Audi had stopped to help, would it have had to pay compensation? It seems like it was the old person who violated traffic regulations. 2. Why not make a law so that these bastards who wrongfully accuse good people must pay a price? TMD the cost [of wrongful accusation] is too low.

vvwwll:

There should be a law to deal with this kind of person, wantonly framing good people, should immediately be punished severely…

誋惗冊:

The more old people like this, the less good people there will be.

shjcnbnxxbdfj:

Must not help this kind of person in the future. If this also reflects a phenomenon of current society, will people still go do good deeds? There are people who want to help but don’t dare to. It’s hard to conduct oneself properly, and even harder to be a good person.

qq1016022:

[Call] 110, 120 [emergency services number] but don’t go touch them.

mauricehawk:

“Fortunately…”, these days one has to be lucky to take pleasure in helping others?

king210019:

Old man, someone kindly helps you and you wrongfully accuse them, I don’t know who brought you up and taught you your morality but don’t teach your son to do this kind of thing. No wonder China can’t develop…

苏之瑞瑞:

If it were me, I wouldn’t have helped him.

-佐佐木希:

This kind of person should die.

skybing00:

With so many elderly trying to cheat people recently… It truly isn’t worth it to help them… Might as well feed one’s conscience to the dogs… lest your conscience brings you huge harm…

hmj1:

All of the talk about how there are still a lot of good people, how one shouldn’t be a bystander but a chivalrous knight [Good Samaritan], and whatever in the media right now I completely ignore because it’ll be too late to regret it when you are cheated! Can’t help it, I was forced to be like this! Everyone let this serve as a warning, be on your guard.

wqq985088050:

It’s just surveillance video…Can you show me what that old man actually said?

wb2841547: (responding to above)

Stop doubting, 90% of the time it is the old person making a false accusation. If it weren’t a false accusation, who would be so bored as to go have the police check the surveillance tape? You really think public servants would would watch the surveillance footage and then upload it to start a rumor?

heihehaha:

The good people can’t afford to drive good cars, and those who drive good cars are all not good people.

zhangze0001:

Yet another young stupid cunt, now duped, let’s see if you’ll do a good deed ever again, you stupid cunt.

立万:

If you have money and want to go help, go ahead, either way I won’t go help, because I don’t have any money.

781296417@eclairqq:

The elderly these days don’t know that there are surveillance cameras everywhere these days, and think people will believe what they say just because they’re old.

啊行星星:

When rescuing someone in the future, first feel your pockets to see how much money you have, otherwise don’t go looking for trouble!!! If you’re defrauded, you were asking for it!!!

大肥鸡炖汤: (responding to above)

First check if there are surveillance cameras around…

注册花了我半小时:

No matter how much society promotes morality, I don’t dare to go help them up. I really don’t have the money to be cheated by unscrupulous elderly.

轩辕灵儿:

Don’t say the reason society’s mores are bad is because of post-80s or post-90s generation people, look at you elderly generation. Requiring a house and car for marriage is whose idea? Slandering/falsely accusing good people is being done by what kind of people?

What do you think? Do you usually trust an elderly person more than a young person? In your opinion, who do you think are generally more moral? The younger generation or the older generations? Do you think society is less moral today than in the past?

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  • J

    Man these things make me sad :(

    • J

      I am pinned under a sofa, won’t you please help me up?

      • John

        You sofa stealing son of a :)

      • Nyancat

        As long as you don’t accuse me of wrongdoing i’ll help you *looks for security cameras*

      • hail

        I like how it took you five minutes to come up with a good sofa line.

      • Misaki

        Saying “sofa” is just like saying “first” which according to this pseudo-scientific survey is one sign of a psychopath.

        No particular reason for mentioning this.

  • Brett Hunan

    Fauna, take a break… youre tearing it up with the posts today!

    Who was the kid accused by? At least he didnt get charged with causing the accident.

    • fabi

      the question remains… by whom was he accused?

    • donscarletti

      The caption at the start of the movie (that was not translated) reads:

      山东临沂一小伙在救助因交通事故被压在电动车底下的受伤老人时,反被冤枉为肇事者,河东区交警调取监控证明该小伙见义勇为救助老人的全过程

      “Shandong Linyi, a young man was helping an old person injured by a traffic crash and crushed under an electric vehicle, then was unjustly taken to be the perpetrator. The Hedong District Traffic Police extracted the surveillance footage proving that the young man acted heroically throughout the whole process of saving the old person.”

      Beyond that, no more information. People just assume a parallel with the Nanjing incident and comment on those assumptions. Welcome to the Internet!

      • Brett Hunan

        I read the caption… thats why I asked. Thanks for trying to help though.

      • anon

        Wasn’t the same thing translated above the video and under the title?

        • fabi

          yes it was^^
          anyway, know one knows… but no one cares even though that’s why they all clicked to read the story

  • John

    Lifting the sofa off of a man… get the cameras going

    • John

      I thought I had the sofa but had to verify my remarks. The combination of greed and face in China leads to a very “special” society.

  • Alan

    What a truly fucked up, ill, sick, and immoral culture.

    I will now not even berate people for gawking and taking photos/videos on their shanzhai iphone, nor lift 1 finger to help.

    Chinese people need to solve their own problems, as I am not Chinese, I will let a baby die, that is sad, but true…..

    • John

      I, on the other hand, completely disagree with you. I will always lend a hand to others, no matter what kind of trouble it gets me into. These people have let the powers that be disable them. Don’t let them disable you.

      • John

        And if my helping someone out gets me into real trouble, at least I’ll make the sofa on ChinaSmack.

      • kou bei dave

        my friend got thrown in jail (for one day) for helping someone and i promised myself to never help again

        but as time has passed, I realize that helping people is in my bones

        my morals shouldn’t change based on my location

    • El Puma R.

      I totally agree with you Alan.

      Three weeks ago a bus hit an old guy here in Changchun. Old guy fell down instantly, his face looking down the floor, lots of blood. He looked pretty dead to me. Horrible… but what really surprised me is that not a single person gave two shits about it. It’s so ridiculously sad.

      • Alan

        As Oscar Wilde said, you can tell a lot about a country/people by how they treat their animals….and well,in lala land?

      • Alan

        Ooopps, not Oscar, but Gandhi I meant to quote:

        “The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated”

        Wonder what he would make of modern day la-la land?

  • Ryo

    Been in China for 5 years. I’ve leard that the older they are, the more evil they can be. Especially the poorer ones. Granted, there are some food older person but these days, they are far and few. It seems as they get closer to their old age demise, the less they care about other people. And why should they? They have nothing to lose. Unfortunately, they also don’t understand what having “morasl” mean. And in China, this “moral” cocept seems to be a very rare for the pre 70s generation.

    The younger generations who are in school seem a lot better. At lease that’s what I see in the city anyway.

    • They lived through the Cultural Revolution… need I say more?

      • Joe

        From smashing up temples and beating up people with glasses to accusing good Samaratins. I got the same feeling when I was in Germany. When I saw old people walking down the street, I just got a mental image of all the people ‘Sieg Heil’ing.

        Hopefully the days of these mass movements are over.

      • donscarletti

        Those who lived through and suffered the Cultural Revolution are too old and sick to ride electric bikes.

        The folks you see that disgust you were not the generation oppressed, but the angry youth that beat their teachers to death and held “struggle sessions” against those trying to save them and their country. Those born during the late 1940s and 1950s are largely human garbage today as they were back then. Those born in the 1930s, or 1960s onwards are far, far easier to like.

        • Vanessa

          Well said!

    • Harland

      Socialism really fucks up a culture, doesn’t it?

      • anon

        I wouldn’t really blame “socialism” for this, given how “socialist” the vast majority of Western governments are. Most people here would think of “communism” even though the Cultural Revolution wasn’t really about communism either…

        Ryo was more accurate. It’s about people who have little and have even less to lose compared to what they stand to gain if successful. Without deeply ingrained moral principals to check that cost-benefit calculation, you get a sort of selfish pragmatism.

        • Harland

          China wasn’t like that before the Revolution. Look it up.

          • Hongjian

            They were. Exactly like nowadays.

            Just read Lu Xun.

          • mr. wiener

            It’s not socialism, it’s overpopulation that is the problem.

          • Hongjian

            And poverty.

            Poverty fucks up every moral foundation of a society and turns people into savages. Dont believe in the crap called ‘the noble savage’ – savage people are only noble until they eat your face.

            But whatever, better a savage than an obese stupid fucking americunt.

          • mr. wiener

            You don’t get obese by eating faces.

  • si

    So quick to condemn the tricycle driver.

    Obviously we will never know the entire truth. But some possibilities lie here.

    Is it possible that the tricycle driver was not able to distinguish between the drive of the Audi and the driver of the rescuer? From the video, it seems the tricycle driver’s vision is on the tricycle, not other cars. Could anyone, in the split second execution evasive measures to avoid an accident be able to distinguish the make and model between two similar coloured vehicles?

    Additionally is it possible, like many others, the tricycle driver is aware of the famous Nanjing Judge decision, those who stop to help must be guilty. Someone experienced in this type of culture may logically come to one assumption.

    Alas we will never know. But at least we can rely on social media for justice, ensuring cases will be processed much more hastily.

    • John

      Even the Chinese people think it’s the “tricycle driver”…

      That’s the point

    • jeffli

      SI
      the cars were completely different in shape. Oh no it wasn’t a red ferrari was it?
      wake up SI!

      • si

        Ahh yes. Again so quick to disparage with possibilities and jump on certainties. As we may well know that police forces all over the world can rely with incontestable perfection of eyewitness memory.

        Yes much more likely I see your logic. When completing a high force/speed turn to evade a broadsided vehicle, internally praying to get through this alive while sphincter muscles pucker to the inevitable forewarned pain, the average person’s memory is first to engrave, that was an sedan not a hatchback.

        • anon

          I think you make a perfectly reasonable comment. I too think there’s a possibility the tricycle driver may have genuinely accused the wrong person versus intentionally wrongly accusing an innocent. He makes an emergency stop and falls over, doesn’t see the car driving away because he’s stuck on the ground with his tricycle blocking his field of vision (and probably in pain), its not impossible or even necessarily unreasonable that he thought the guy who came to help was the same guy who cut him off in the first place.

          Of course, we can also say this just shows how unobservant he was of his surroundings in traffic or that he’s still a prick for wanting to accuse someone when its possible, even likely, it was his own fault for not operating his vehicle safely or obeying traffic rules (running a red light?). But its possible he wasn’t intentionally trying to accuse someone he knew to be innocent.

          I don’t think the Nanjing judge case taught people that those who stop must be guilty. It taught people how ridiculous that notion is. Therefore, its less likely that the old man assumed the guy was the one responsible BECAUSE he stopped and more likely that he assumed he could pin it on the guy for stopping BECAUSE of the well-known Nanjing judge ruling. This is assuming he was intentionally trying to pin the blame on an someone he knew to be innocent.

          The video title and description doesn’t make clear if the old man intentionally wrongly accused the guy or simply accused him wrongly. We do know that Chinese netizens assumed the former rather than the latter. I think si brings up a valid question.

        • jeffli

          the old guy would not even know how to say “sedan” or “hatchback” in Chinese. agreed
          but my father -93 years old, half blind and half deaf (+13 yrs or more on the old ‘victim’) can even tell the difference!

          Trust you to talk about an old mans sphincter!

    • cc

      So quick to condemn the tricycle driver.
      And rightly so, they are a bloody menace, nearly as bad as a Chinese driving a car.

    • Xiongmao

      I do also think there could be a misunderstanding. If the guy is old, possibly shocked a bit from the accident, hit is head a little or something he might just have made a mistake. Still, having been in China for 4 years I’m painfully aware that some people will take any opportunity to bleed a stranger dry and you never know which person you meet it can be.

      Btw, where is the Audi coming from? It looks like he’s crossing from red but it says he ‘cut’s him off’ which implies they both come from the same -green- direction. Honestly? The way most bikes, scooters, motorbikes and tricycles ride here I wouldn’t be at all surprised if the old man hadn’t paid attention to anything before he rode forward.

  • Boris

    ‘Good people are still the majority, bravo for this young guy’ -ding this comment.
    And it looks as if it wasn’t the Audi’s fault,
    WHICH MAKES A F**KING CHANGE!

    • mr. wiener

      I’d ding it too. There are good people in China, they just have to hide it really well so they are not taken advantage of.

  • XiaoHei

    I can’t believe this old man. Wow, way to disillusion young people. What will you do when Karma bites you back?

    It’s OK, I think I will still risk punishment to help someone. What is the worst they can do anyway? Take all my money, send me to jail or hang me? LOL

    • John

      Or in the case of Bo XiLai, do all three. ;)

  • John in Korea

    It is not just China that this happens. I have lived in several countries, including the United States, Vietnam, and S. Korea. It happens everywhere because people care for only one thing…. Themselves.. The owner of the Audi will get what is coming to him, God willing….

    • John

      I swore my last comment was the last comment… but did you read the story?

      This happens everywhere? Your vehicle is overturned, someone comes to help you, you tell the police it was their fault, you want money?

      WHA?

    • cc

      Why? The Audi driver didn’t do any thing wrong, the silly old git on the trike jumped the lights in my opinion.

      • Xiongmao

        I don’t think he jumped any lights. All the cars in the left side are stopped so the trike must have had green. I’m still a bit unsure of where exactly the Audi was coming from though, maybe he jumped yellow and was late into the intersection.

        • cc

          The cars on the left are on red, you should know by now that it is highly dangerous to have traffic moving on both sides of the road at the same time in China, recipe for disaster.

  • Jeff

    I was riding my bike in Suzhou just yesterday and I saw a dude on an ebike get popped by a car. In the WEST I would stop to help in a minute without even thinking about it.

    Here I cursed the ebike rider for blocking my path.

  • Jeff

    Well after watching it a few times I can say the car didn’t hit the old man and without seeing the whole picture regarding WHERE the black car came from I can say it looks like the old man’s fault. And yeah he did a face plant, that is for sure.

    And weeing that the black car didn’t make contact I would say it’s the old man’s fault.

    • Slob

      “Well after watching it a few times I can say the car didn’t hit the old man”

      You’re completely fucking retarded. So if I drive a lambourghini at you going 200 miles per hour and you can see the speed I’m coming so you inevitably MOVE to avoid getting hit, suddenly I hit the brakes but you fell over from moving so fast, that means it’s your fault? So I can ride around on my motorbike skimming past people and if they fall over it’s their fault? I can swing a sword at someone’s head and if they duck to avoid it and bump their head on a table, it’s their fault?

      “without seeing the whole picture regarding WHERE the black car came from”

      Where do you think it came from? The sky? It’s CLEARLY coming from the south side THROUGH a red light. Look on the right hand side. You see that red arrow? That means STOP. No, it wasn’t making a right turn either. It is driving through a red light, it swerves to avoid the guy on the cart, it’s the audi’s fault 100%.

  • what is even worse, yet totally normal in china: at 00:42 of that video you can see an old person pulling a child over the crossing. not that it matters that light had turned red already…
    spoiling their stupid offspring (especially males) with all possible shit and the next minute acting totally irresponsible.

    • Kong

      Silly Chinese. No one in the rest of the normal world jaywalks. *pssh*

      • not with a child at least.

        • Chad

          …. pray tell what magical world do you live in?

        • mr. wiener

          I’ve seen women coming out from between parked cars, totally heedless of oncoming traffic and leading with a baby pram ,fer fucks sake!. It’s why I never ride my motorbike in the lane closest to the curb.

  • jeffli

    That s sad.
    The old man must have known.

    In other countries people are grateful for help from bystanders.

    This old man should be shamed of himself. He should know better. Has he thought of the consequences of his actions if there wasn’t a camera at that intersection?

    Has it come down to this where there is not even the smallest amount of trust?
    How can this be explained? This old man nearly ruined a young mans life for gods sake!

    Why, Why, Why?
    Why must he be so unkind even to a fellow country man (it shouldn’t matter) Is this old man a dog or uncultured animal?
    Is there no humanity left?
    Does any one know what that means here?

    This is so sad and I’ve seen this type of stuff before but only in China.
    I pity that Chinese must live here like this. I really do hope society here could improve. I don’t want my friends having to live like animals like this.
    Its not fair!
    Its not human!
    Heaven loves reasonable people.
    This is not reasonable under anybody’s moon!

    Don’t Chinese feel a little embarrassed?
    I feel embarrassed when my Crountry-men do bad things like this.
    It really is greedy.

    • jeffli

      here we see a true red blooded gentleman stopping to help this old man. This old man wants to get this guy in trouble?

      Its not fair.
      So greedy!
      just wants to milk and innocent person of their money!

    • John

      But this also shows the growing difference between rich and poor. I’m sure in the old man’s head, he thought “I’ve got nothing, this guy’s got a car. I lived through the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. This guy lived through what? The internet, video games, and foreign DVDs? I deserve a piece.”

      I could be wrong, I’ve been trying to understand the behavior of Chinese society for some time now. Not easy.

  • glenn

    China: If you don’t help you will be condemned by the chinese netizens. If you decide to, you will be sued by the victim you tried to help.

    • Dr SUN

      TIC, glenn. Sad but just how it is.

      It’s better to let someone bleed out in front of you, than help and get sued.
      There’s no good Samaritan law here, that’s why there’s no CPR classes taught (no demand).

      • glenn

        That is indeed a sad thing to hear. Let’s hope that soon enough, people would realize how such acts are detrimental to the morals of a society and would call for change.

  • Rin5

    This kind of incidents is the origin of “Chinese negligence”.
    Yes, mind your own business… in China it is more than half likely that you will be accused of helping others and be betrayed by them. In China, there is no true relationship, all relationships are superfacial and built upon benefits.

    Ok fine, 99%.

    • rightran

      this seems to go to extremes, at least family relationships are true.

    • Jason

      What about the relationship between me and my Chinese friends?

      When we hang out at the local pub what benefits does he have for me?

      I sure as hell don’t know any.

      Maybe you can give me some pointers how I can get some benefits from them huh?

  • milkfiddle

    I have lived in China for many years but today something really disturbed me.

    An old lady dropped off her grandchild at kindergarten and rode onto the main road where she was hit by a car. This is nothing special and happens all too often in China but what followed made me lose faith in Chinese society and leads me to believe that today the Chinese society is truly dysfunctional.

    At first she was able to walk, then she laid down albeit bleeding from the head and nose. A crowd of people gathered to watch and take photos. She laid there for 40 minutes dying until the ambulance finally turned up. Then she was dead. For 40 minutes people stood and watched her die.

    The town I live in is rich and people fly around in bentleys, BMWs and range rovers, there are two city hospitals within a 3 mile radius. Why did she wait so long for an Ambulance?

    The only answer I have is that was rush hour and the Chinese mentality makes people think they are more important than the next and so they will never give way to anyone never mind an ambulance with blue lights. This needs to change- how about having a video camera at the front of every ambulance and fining every selfish prick that obstructs it reaching it’s destination in order to save a life.

    Why did people just stand and watch her die for 40 minutes? Why did no-one so much as comfort her?

    Why did she have to die alone?

    Answering this is tricky,

    People are scared to help as they think if she dies in their care they will get the blame and hence sued for millions. I don’t buy this it is a poor excuse.

    People in China are brought up to behave like sheep, thinking for one’s self can be frowned upon. It takes guts to break the mold and it is unlikely that one will make themselves vulnerable by helping a stranger.

    Another reason is that people just really don’t know what to do- there is no first aid training at all that I know of. People die and people watch uselessly because they really are useless.

    Society really needs to start developing as material wealth does- so many things are important in life not just cash. Number One must be compassion as it means when you are in the shit some one may have your back.

    Number 2 Think of all the children that even now don’t know how to cross a road safely and think of the way drivers are pathetically kind of taught to so called drive a car.

    I cannot see any improvements in the next 30 years.

    • Fu ZhiGao

      That sounds terrible. Were you able to do anything?

      I helped a guy who wiped out in a bike lane and suffered a severe head injury. I found out later from a policeman who came to interview me (because the accident had been so bad and because I was like the only person who left a number and had witnessed what had happened) that he later went into a coma later and his family couldn’t afford the hospital bills so they took him home and he probably died.

      The situation wasn’t as bad as the one you described. We called an ambulance and I think they took about ten minutes to arrive.

      • milkfiddle

        It was outside my friends house, I wasn’t there. All the neighbours talked about it all evening.

        They compared it to the girl who was run over and 18 people walked past.

        Collective shame this evening, I am sure.

        • mike

          You wouldn’t have done anything yourself either. Stop playing.

        • Chom

          @milkfiddle Are you sure you weren’t there? Your post reads like you witnessed the whole thing…

      • Little Wolf

        I’ve seen an ambulance, lit up and obviously an injured person in the back, take almost 10 minutes just to enter the driveway of a hospital, thanks to the wonderful citizens that couldn’t even take 5 seconds to let it through.

        • Alan

          take almost 10 minutes just to enter the driveway of a hospital, thanks to the wonderful citizens that couldn’t even take 5 seconds to let it through.

          Well said LW.

          Or as it is known amongst us foreigners in China:

          “After you, I come first” to describe the mentality on the roads and blocking/entering places.

          • Little Wolf

            I keep a syringe loaded with Demerol in my first aid kit on my motorcycle. I seen too many people dead here that could have been saved if they’d been helped in time. And frankly, after my ordeal with the gallstones, I’m not going through that kind of thing again EVER.

    • mike

      And what did YOU do other than judge? Exactly.

    • Jason

      what about the guy in the video who helped the old man?

      Why not talk about him instead of focusing on others?

      I’m sure he has compassion

  • milkfiddle

    I have never written this before you can check all the history.

    I have lived in China for many years but today something really disturbed me.

    An old lady dropped off her grandchild at kindergarten and rode onto the main road where she was hit by a car. This is nothing special and happens all too often in China but what followed made me lose faith in Chinese society and leads me to believe that today the Chinese society is truly dysfunctional.

    At first she was able to walk, then she laid down albeit bleeding from the head and nose. A crowd of people gathered to watch and take photos. She laid there for 40 minutes dying until the ambulance finally turned up. Then she was dead. For 40 minutes people stood and watched her die.

    The town I live in is rich and people fly around in bentleys, BMWs and range rovers, there are two city hospitals within a 3 mile radius. Why did she wait so long for an Ambulance?

    The only answer I have is that was rush hour and the Chinese mentality makes people think they are more important than the next and so they will never give way to anyone never mind an ambulance with blue lights. This needs to change- how about having a video camera at the front of every ambulance and fining every selfish prick that obstructs it reaching it’s destination in order to save a life.

    Why did people just stand and watch her die for 40 minutes? Why did no-one so much as comfort her?

    Why did she have to die alone?

    Answering this is tricky,

    People are scared to help as they think if she dies in their care they will get the blame and hence sued for millions. I don’t buy this it is a poor excuse.

    People in China are brought up to behave like sheep, thinking for one’s self can be frowned upon. It takes guts to break the mold and it is unlikely that one will make themselves vulnerable by helping a stranger.

    Another reason is that people just really don’t know what to do- there is no first aid training at all that I know of. People die and people watch uselessly because they really are useless.

    Society really needs to start developing as material wealth does- so many things are important in life not just cash. Number One must be compassion as it means when you are in the shit some one may have your back.

    Number 2 Think of all the children that even now don’t know how to cross a road safely and think of the way drivers are pathetically kind of taught to so called drive a car.

    I cannot see any improvements in the next 30 years.

    • rin5

      Totally agreed.
      Not much morals going on, nor will it get better if ever.

    • Alan

      @ Milkfiddle:

      What you write is true. Or what my laowai band of brothers who owned various motorbikes and cars deemed:

      After you, I come first!!!

      No traffic or line etiquette, none at all.

  • glowndark

    Dear fauna,
    I really think you should run a new website and translate this site back into chinese with all the comments to provide your countrymen a window to look beyond their own country and what people from other countries have to say about china. If tchina is a ‘face saving’ country, maybe they need to know what other people think about chinese people

    • marsvin

      Don’t you think they dislike us enough already?

      • lonetrey

        So, because they’ll dislike us for disliking their wrong-doing, it shouldn’t be done?

    • john digmeme

      She’d end up breaking rocks with a spoon in Qinghai.
      No thanks.

    • anon

      What makes you think Chinese people don’t already read and know what foreigners think? There are already Chinese websites that do similar things, translating foreign articles and comments into Chinese. The Chinese reactions to foreigner comments are similar to the foreign reactions to Chinese comments. Plenty of agreement, disagreement, and cognitive dissonance.

    • Shanghairen

      The Chinese would think all foreigners are either complete idiots or trolls.

  • james loh

    this person ought to be put on t v billboards. all media make him an example that other dont dare abuse kindness!

  • Slob

    Seen this so many times it’s not funny.

    Idiots running red lights.
    Idiots falling off cheap vehicles (carts etc.) sitting on the ground pretending to be mortally wounded with intentions of extorting money.
    Idiots helping them and getting into trouble for it.
    Idiots not stopping to help someone they caused an accident to.

    China. Idiots everywhere.

    • bert

      The other day I was in a western style buffet restaurant and some local middle aged guy was yelling at the cook about not getting his meat cooked and served to him fast enough. I mean really yelling. It was so retarded. I tell ya, sometimes Chinese act just like American blacks, except for the dancing.

      • Young Man

        Nice. Really classy comment.

        I’m sure you’re a far superior person.

  • Slob

    After checking the video again, I have noticed several things :

    -The old man was not at fault. He was crossing through a green pedestrian light. When he ‘blamed’ the guy for hitting him, watch the video again you will see his leg is stuck after he falls down which means he didn’t even realise the guy who was helping him was not the guy in the Audi because he was too busy pulling his leg out from under the cart – they’re both dark cars so he thought it was the same one, it’s not his fault.

    -The Audi was at fault completely running a red light and not stopping to help. The fucking idiots who drive around in their expensive cars thinking they’re king shit need to be put in their place. Makes an old guy fall down and doesn’t even stop to help.

    Really… if this people here keep this up, foreigners are just going to keep reporting this behaviour to the outside world and China’s reputation will keep dropping regardless of their economic situation. If the people don’t even look after each other, how can they call themselves Chinese? They’re just born in China, they’re not part of the Chinese community. “I’m Chinese and I’m proud of my country”…yeah fucking right. More like “I’m proud that this country has given me what I have and I don’t give a shit about it or the people in it”.

    Reminds me of the 18 people and the 2 year old kid which by the way, if any of those 18 people were ever named publicly in Australia, they would each be hunted down and regret their decision to not help. We don’t tolerate that kind of bullshit where I come from and especially not when it comes to young kids or elderly people.

    • Right…

      Even in developed countries, there have been quite a few bystander-effect stories, in which no one helps the victim. It’s rooted in basic human behavior. People reading these stories like to act all disgusted and get on their moral high horse to say that they would have helped out, when in reality, very few would actually step in to help under the circumstances. Most likely, you would probably tell yourself that (1) you don’t know how to help and don’t want to make the situation worse or (2) someone else will help so you don’t have to get involved.

      For example here is one somewhat recent story in NYC:

      http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/queens/passers_by_let_good_sam_die_5SGkf5XDP5ooudVuEd8fbI

      • Slob

        To ‘Right…’

        You’re using THAT as an example of westerners ignoring people in need? You’re comparing a homeless, dirty man covered in blood on the sidewalk, to a 2 year old girl lying in the middle of the road bloodied from being run over? Please link an example showing a young girl dying while people stroll past. There’s a huge difference between a hobo covered in blood and a 2 year old girl lying injured in the middle of the road. As sad as it is for the man who died, and it is cowardly for no-one to even call 911 for help, if you see a man lying on the ground and a child lying on the ground…which one do you instinctively run to help first? If you see a man getting beaten and a 2 year old getting beaten, who would you go help first? If a man is hungry and a 2 year old is hungry, who do you feed first? They’re incomparable.

        In situations like this where a man is bloodied on the ground, natural instinct might tell you that there is danger around and by helping him you would be placing yourself in harm’s way. If a 2 year old girl is lying in the middle of the road covered in blood, your body will NOT instinctively avoid the situation for fear of putting yourself in harm’s way. It would be to run and assist her as the body reacts differently to seeing the helpless and innocent being harmed as it does to seeing those who appear able-bodied (a grown man for example).

        I’ve helped a lot of injured people here who have fallen off bikes, people tripping, things falling on people – a few years ago I rushed a woman to hospital after some idiot threw a whole bag of rubbish out of a window onto the sidewalk and it landed right on her. These situations are different to seeing something like a robbery or assault taking place which require a lot more courage to step in and help like the recent news of the Brazilian guy stopping thieves. But seeing someone lying on the road, it doesn’t matter who you are, natural instinct tells you to help and the young guy in the video deserves a lot of credit. He didn’t stop along the way, he went out of his way, turned the car around, to selflessly help an old man lying on the road.

        • anon

          Okay, look, you’re intentionally refusing to acknowledge a well-studied and well-documented human phenomenon that is consistently found in every society and country out of a misguided effort to maintain a sort of moral superiority delineated along racial, cultural, or national lines. At the end of the day, you’re arguing “my people are better than your people”.

          Quick Google search for “bystander effect young girl”:

          http://www.officer.com/article/10232777/national-bystander-effect
          – young girl gang raped while over 20 people stood by and watched for over 2 hours.

          http://www.snotr.com/video/5821/Bystander_Effect_-_people_watch_girl_being_abducted
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIvGIwLcIuw
          – news staged abduction of little girl in broad daylight just to demonstrate how common bystander effect is, girl obviously screaming that she doesn’t know the guy manhandling her by the arm and people just walk by.

          If we’re going to nitpick differences about our examples, bystanders can do a lot more for a young girl being raped or abducted than one that was run over and seemingly already dead. Or have you never heard of the excuse “it was too late, what could I have done anyway?”

          Want to do more reading? http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/we_are_all_bystanders/

          Time and time again we see people thinking the best of themselves when time and time again we see that the vast majority of people remain bystanders in the vast majority of situations where they could’ve done something. Right… is completely correct. There’s a possibility that you’re part of the exceedingly small minority of people who would consistently do something but the probability is exceedingly small. That’s just the way it is. You naturally will remember your finer moments over your less finer moments. Preservation of the ego. Acknowledgement of this fact isn’t a discouragement or justification for inaction, but a legitimate push back against obnoxious moral high horsing.

          We foreigners have been reporting the behavior of the “barbaric” and “uncivilized” around the world to our own for centuries now. That threat doesn’t have much teeth to it, because the other side reports examples of our own barbarism and uncivilized behavior to their own too.

          Also, the young guy in the video was in the left turn u-turn lane (look at the car behind him that also makes a u-turn) so technically he didn’t “turn his car around” in an “out of the way” sort of way. He was making a u-turn anyway. He did, however, go out of his way and he was indeed being selfless. That is rightfully to be applauded, no one disagrees here.

          • Little Wolf

            Oh shit anon! Just ask yourself where would you rather get hit by a car? China? Or just about anywhere else. Be honest. I don’t even have to think about it. It’s that simple.

          • anon

            “Just about anywhere else” is a bit of an exaggeration, don’t you think? World is a big place, LW, I think you ought to keep that in mind.

            Just because I recognize that certain places have certain generalizations doesn’t mean this sort of moral high horsing isn’t obnoxious and unjustified. At the end of the day, you’re upset because what I’ve causes cognitive dissonance when you’d rather continue maintaining “a sort of moral superiority delineated along racial, cultural, or national lines.”

            Otherwise, why the desperate resistance to what Right… said?

            We all generalize because its how organize information. We do so in order to make choices and live our lives. It’s unavoidable. What is avoidable is misguidedly trying to defend our generalizations against the rational truth in order to preserve our egos. Fact remains that bystander effect and apathy is a common phenomenon everywhere. It doesn’t mean we shouldn’t condemn it when it happens in China amongst Chinese people. It just means we shouldn’t make the mistake of thinking we’re so high and mighty.

          • moop

            i disagree. i can’t speak for other countries, but in america we are socialized to “stick up for the little guy” and “root for the underdog” its in our psyche, we are bombarded with it when we are young, most americans hold to at least some basic christian beliefs, one of which is sacrificing for and helping others. obviously most american fail to live up to these expectations and most people are indeed selfish assholes. having said that i would still say that on average more americans would respond in the “moral” way more often than the chinese. the chinese aren’t socialized the way we are, they don’t “root for the underdog” and defending the weak is not something they are socialized to do, they aren’t even socialized to idolize that kind of behavior as we are. being that most people are selfish pricks around the world regardless, a main contributing factor to the “bystander effect” would certainly be people’s socialization. we’ve mentioned bystanders and we’ve mentioned heroes, but we haven’t mentioned the guy who stands there weighing and analyzing all the possible outcomes and scenarios only to make up his mind once the situation/danger has passed. maybe the same kind of person who, say, over-analyzes everything in general and writes a lot of pretencious drivel?

          • Little Wolf

            anon…good job awarding yourself some kind of fake victory by imagining me to be upset. If anything, I’m simply amazed by your buffoonery and puffery. Btw,I never read “right’s” comment. So just answer the fucking question. I’ll make it easier for you. You’re crossing a city street and get hit by a car. Would you consider that your chances of bystanders rendering aid and quick emergency response be given in A: China B: USA, Canada, Australia?
            If I was to answer with B how is that “high-horsing and obnoxious”?
            Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

          • Slob

            Greatest 2 examples someone could possibly give : A girl getting raped by boys at a school dance while horny testosterone filled boys watch on and probably jerk off, and a faked video of an un-natural young girl being stagedly kidnapped. Great job.

            School dance rape – I don’t even need to comment on this one. As bad as it is, they’re just horny little bastards wanting to see some action.

            Kidnapping – Jesus…I bet you watch Fox news and read the New York Times on a daily basis. The first 2 demonstrations the man is talking to her like he’s her dad “Don’t you do that again” and she’s replying “helppp you’re not my dad” – if a girl was being kidnapped she would be struggling a lot more and screaming. The girl was barely yelling so people obviously think it’s her dad. The 3rd demonstration she cries “someone help me you’re not my dad!” and the man replies with “come on” which is obviously not something a father would say. He would be like “knock it off or you’re grounded” so they come to help. Your example actually proves my point that westerners WOULD come to help the innocent girl in need.

            Thanks bro. And next time try to post REAL videos/articles of toddlers being left on the street in developed western countries without being helped.

          • Slob

            And one more thing, a kidnapper wouldn’t try to pull the arm of someone they’re trying to kidnap in broad daylight. They’d snatch them quickly with a vehicle close by.

          • anon

            moop,

            Yes, I agree that socialization of such ideals in America but that unfortunately doesn’t mean bystander effect, inaction, apathy and indifference are still common social phenomenon. You agree with me that most Americans “obviously” fail to live up to these expectations.

            I’m not sure how much I agree with your generalization that Chinese are not socialized to root for the underdog or defend the weak (it’s a pillar of Communist ideology?). I agree they aren’t socialized in the exact same way Americans are and that’s obvious. One problem is that its inherently difficult for non-Chinese people to understand the socialization of Chinese people to the same degree of intimacy and sophistication as they may understand the socialization of themselves. That’s something to consider. It’s one thing to compare and contrast two things with equal information, but another to compare and contrast two things when you know a lot more about one and a lot less about the other. I think this should be acknowledged.

            The knee jerk antipathy towards analysis and characterization of “pretentious drivel” reminds me of the Palinesque celebration of anti-intellectualism.

            Little Wolf,

            You never read Right…’s comment and decided you would weigh in on a conversation involving it?

            If it wasn’t obvious, let me explain to you what moral high horsing refers to:

            We don’t tolerate that kind of bullshit where I come from…

            Surely you’re not ignorant of how often these comments are made here, right?

            Right simply responded by saying this kind of bullshit happens in the West too. That’s a fact. Slob responds by trying to split hairs and show how its still different. You and moop come in ignoring the crux of the issue in contention, changing it from “whether or not this bullshit happens/is tolerated in the West, and show me proof!” to “where would you rather be run over?”

            Sometimes a cigar is indeed just a cigar.

            Slob,

            Your defense right now involves splitting hairs. Right…’s valid response was that there are bystander-effect stories in developed countries is valid, is it not? Should Chinese people split hairs saying there aren’t school attacks in China because unlike those in America, they were using knives instead of guns? That they didn’t climb a bell tower? The difference in detail is there but the fundamental phenomenon remains the same. Do you really think there haven’t been bystander incidents involving children?

            Axel Casian, a 2-year-old, in California, stomped to death by his father in front of a crowd of people, including a volunteer fire chief. Unlike the 18 Chinese people who walked by after the Yueyue was seemingly dead on the ground not moving, these people watched a grown man stomp a toddler to death right in front of them. They watched it happen. Go ahead and look it up.

            Chances are, you’re going to come back hairsplitting again. Every case or example has differences in details but it is simply dishonest to reject the fundamental point they serve to illustrate, which is that bystander effect happens everywhere and they’re almost always tragic circumstances. Just what is your resistance to this? Ego preservation.

            There is a reason why civil law Western countries legislate a duty to help people in need, because there were too many instances of people not doing so. There’s a reason why common law Western countries have Good Samaritan laws, to protect those who do (though there is no requirement for people to act). There’s a reason why “bystander effect” is a known social phenomenon, because it happens often enough and in such tragic circumstances that people actually study it. So please, go study it.

          • moop

            “I’m not sure how much I agree with your generalization that Chinese are not socialized to root for the underdog or defend the weak (it’s a pillar of Communist ideology?)”

            china isn’t communist, is a fascist authoritarian state run by technocrats, and its forays into communism ended sometime after the cultural revolution. very little aspects of chinese society actually reflect communism except for the whole thing where everyone thinks alike (they do, haven’t seen many polls with 90%+ percent of people responding the same way). whether or not it is a plank of communism is irrelevant, and i would argue that what you’ve mentioned isn’t a plank of communism, maybe it’s what gets the ball rolling, but not the end result, where everyone is “equal” and therefore there is no little guy, or they are all little guys in solidarity (more likely the case) beholden to the state.

            chinese are socialized to fear/respect/be in awe of authority and power. they are socialized to maintain the status quo. they are socialized to contribute to ,protect, and hold together their families. they are socialized to use relationships as a safety net/free ride/personal benefit. they are socialized to believe that the end result justifies the means. they are socialized that other people’s (not family or friends) problems are none of their business, and they are socialized to believe that individually people have no real power
            a random person on the street isn’t a part of your family, have no relationship for you to benefit from, the person (or people) doing the beating is the one with power, and doing nothing is about as status quo as status quo gets…

          • David C.

            “chinese are socialized to fear/respect/be in awe of authority and power. they are socialized to maintain the status quo… they are socialized that other people’s (not family or friends) problems are none of their business, and they are socialized to believe that individually people have no real power
            a random person on the street isn’t a part of your family, have no relationship for you to benefit from, the person (or people) doing the beating is the one with power, and doing nothing is about as status quo as status quo gets…”

            @moop

            I must say that I disagree with your above statement. If you pay attention to Chinese news, you would often find incidents where common people staging protests against local governments in order to protect their rights. A good recent example can be found in Chongqing, where massive protests took place in April and late May of this year, which resulted in conflicts with local police. If Chinese people are simply “socialized to fear/respect/be in awe of authority and power” and that they are “socialized that other people’s (not family or friends) problems are none of their business, and they are socialized to believe that individually people have no real power”, then we shouldn’t be seeing these kinds of incidents taking place. The relationship between the people and government authority in China can be very complicated. One must avoid using simple generalizations to describe that relationship. Please note that I am not claiming the Chinese people are champions of individual rights, however, they are not exactly that submissive either. If you do a search on the web on protests in China, you would find many incidents like the one I listed, of various scales. Here is a link to that story:

            http://www.qjz.com.cn/2012/china_0529/18564.html

            Here are 2 articles that also provide some analysis on social unrest in China.

            http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903703604576587070600504108.html

            http://www.economist.com/node/21543477

        • An anonymous boy…

          @Slob: I can turn around and speculate the exact opposite of you:

          People will have higher empathetic arousal in dangerous situations. So they will help out more likely. Does that make my feelings right? nope…maybe you’re right…

          Instead of speculating about something based on how you feel people would react, think about it more critically. There are two sides to every feeling.

          Or you should actually read a study such as:
          “The unresponsive bystander: Are bystanders more responsive in dangerous emergencies?.”

          Turns out they are…so you are completely wrong. In low potential dangerous situations if there is a bystander, people are probably not going to help out.

    • Boris

      Sorry for jumping to conclusions earlier. You’re right -it definitely looks like it is the Audi running a red light. It’s quite possible the driver saw the old man tumbling over, since he takes pretty drastic evasive action to avoid him. As an avid (livid!) cyclist, I’m astounded at how many times I’ve nearly been killed because of the selfishness of some of the drivers in the city where I live. All the confrontations that have resulted have been with drivers of expensive vehicles. As for foreigners reporting this to the outside world:most foreigners I know here are English teachers with a thirst for culture, and they didn’t come here primarily to make money. I think increasingly they find it unsettling that an uber-class is evolving which is above the law. I don’t think many of these teachers will want to stick around. This is hypocritical, and perhaps I should get taken to task over it. Foreigners have had a high status in China (in some respects). Their status is gradually decreasing. We will increasingly be in the situation of more average Chinese people -forced to cope with inequalities that our foreign staus may have previously exempted us from. We will come to empathise more accutely with the predicament of average Chinese -and we won’t like it. I think a lot of foreigners who have been enjoying their lives here will want to leave in the future. It won’t be the minor frustrations of being cheated by a fruit-seller, it will be having lower social staus -and rights -than the growing nouveau riche. For citizens born into democracies, that’s pretty hard to take.

      • tai wai

        It seems you are contradicting yourself.

        Do you believe that foreigners live in China want to truly experience Chinese culture, or because they want higher status (than perhaps they have earned, just by being English speakers)?

        • I_AM_YR_DAD

          They have earned it by having biggers penises.
          Sorry…but true!!!!!
          Grow yourself a penis..go to http://www.grow-a-penis.com.

          • tai wai

            I’m good, thanks though.

            /laowai

        • Boris

          I know, I am contradicting myself. I came to China to experience a different culture. I had no idea how people would treat me. I didn’t realise the ways that white foreigners were held in high esteem here. That wasn’t my motivation for coming, but it was certainly a bonus. If I had to experience the life a lot of my Chinese friends have -diabolically long hours, low pay, exploitation by bosses, for example -I could do it for a year. That would’ve been the price to satisfy my curiosity for living in China. But I didn’t have to face those things. My life’s relatively comfortable. Has my status as a foreigner been earnt? Of course not! I often feel I’m living a lifestyle I don’t deserve. I’m a hypocrite because I will allow myself to be treated more than equal, but not less than. I’ve been in situations where employers have wanted to take advantage of their staff, have abused their Chinese staff, but have avoided antagonising their foreign ones. Obviously this is unfair and causes resentment. I have a nasty feeling that the average Chinese person’s rights are not going to be raised to those of foreigner’s. Our rights will be reduced more to their level. Although it’s fair for us to experience the system the way average Chinese do, I think many of us will be unwilling. If you’re living in China, ask yourself if you would tollerate living at the bottom of the social scale, knowing that richer people have not only more wealth, but power than you. Look at this situation for example. More foreigners would assist someone in a traffic accident, for sure. But lots of us would put it down to a stronger moral backbone -which is of course bullshit. We know, as foreigners, no-one’s going to believe we’re helping because we caused the accident. Our status therefore protects us. What I fear is that as our status decreases -and it will -we’ll find ourselves in the same quandry as the Chinese: should I help?/ what consequences may I have to face?/ am I financially capable of facing them? I think foreigners living in China seek a paradox: they want to experience Chinese culture, but they also want a level of protection from it. Many want a balance of adventure and comfort.

          • linette

            Boris
            Everything you say about the situation in China is so truth. I give you credit to tell the truth.

          • Little Wolf

            What status? There is as much of a downside to being a foreigner here to counter any “perks” like not having to wait in line at Pizza Hut. And I never take advantage of that kind of shit anyway.

        • Slob

          Status? I’m not a bad looking guy, I’ve had several girlfriends in Australia before I came here, I am a generally nice guy. The way I’m treated here may be better than in Australia in terms of concessions and freedom to do a lot more, but that doesn’t mean I came here for it. Nor did I come here for the culture. I came just for a different change in career because every back home is doing the same crappy jobs and I wanted something different. If I get treated like a superstar, that’s not my fault.

          Why do Chinese always bring this argument up – You only came here for the status because you’re a nobody in your country. It’s completely false. Many foreign friends here are really nice guys who are popular back home too. If you went abroad and were very popular, people treated you well, girls loved you (or guys if you’re female), you were often invited out for dinner/drinks, your salary was higher than average etc. What would you do? Don’t give me that bullshit “Oh, I wouldn’t do it”. Gtfo. You wouldn’t do it because you’ve never had the chance and possibly never will so it creates jealousy and hatred towards foreigners especially the men.

          • Little Wolf

            What Slob says…X 2

          • anon

            Chinese bring up that argument just like foreigners bring up arguments about Chinese that involve gross generalizations. If you can understand why some foreigners do it, you can understand why some Chinese do it. No shortage of retards on both sides.

  • korea21

    in america i would leave him there on the ground

  • Hannah

    a question in mind, who blamed the young man?

    • Rod

      Yes, I’m still wondering this.

    • 404namenotfound

      Uh the old man?

  • The old guy probably really thought that guy who helped him was the guy at fault. Both cars were black, and why would a random person stop to help (this is China, after all), etc…

    Judging by the lights it looks like the old man has the right of way… people commenting in the post need to understand the rules of the road a little better…

    • john digmeme

      “and why would a random person stop to help (this is China, after all)”

      This is exactly the line of reasoning used by the judge in the first, famous case.
      Where does this line of reasoning come from (in general)? How the hell are they going to correct this rationale?

      • kodi

        They can’t correct this rationale! Judges in China are not even required to have studied the law! Furthermore, Humane treatment of other human beings is non-existent in their line of reasoning! Animals competing against other animals in order to become humane is still the overall environment. When someone does something nice, or goes out of their way to help a fellow human being it is still somewhat odd to others. To them it really is non of their business when someone else is in trouble. Most of the sane people with the economic means leave this country to live in civilized nations. Too bad more and more insane people are gaining wealth in order to enter our developed nations.

    • b. prichard

      But if you can’t tell who did it, why accuse anyone? Just because he helped you? That way lies madness.

      And why would you inherently believe that the person who caused the accident helped you? Given experience, that seems like a super unreasonable judgment to make.

  • Notorious

    Awww that was so nice of the young man to help and I am glad his reputation was redeemed. I hope he continues his good acts and kindness, one day he will surely be rewarded.

    To give the old man the benefit of doubt, both cars were black, and in his confusion of being injured perhaps he mistook the boy’s black car for the one that nearly run him over. perhaps a msunderstanding all around.

  • eattot

    ……….
    what a strange world

  • Globetrot

    I’ve never been falsely accused but I have suffered repercussions because of this stuff. I had an accident last year and was seriously hurt. The guy that caused the accident took off so I was left with a smashed up bike, lying in the middle of a busy intersection during morning rush hour, unable to stand up, and with nobody helping me. Even when I was asked for help in both English and Chinese, people looked at me briefly but just walked past leaving me on the road. I’d have been pretty depressed were I not in shock from what had just happened.

    Finally, after about a minute a car pulled over and a man and woman helped me off the road, drove me to the hospital, and stayed with me until a friend was able to meet me there. It was probably smart that they didn’t give me their phone number or email but I just really wish I could thank them.

    My opinion of Chinese society is that, on one hand, they can be tremendously welcoming, generous, and kind. On the other hand, if they don’t know you and you have no importance or relevance to their life, the overwhelming majority just don’t care about you. It’s not their problem… You might as well not exist.

    • Hongjian

      Chinese society is one of “collective egoism”, which can best be described by seeing the layout of the traditional chinese housings in Beijing, the si he yuan, that is walled up and isolated from everyone else.
      The thinking of the people is just like this: To everyone living inside this walled compound, be welcoming, generous and kind, for they are family and the immediate collective. To everyone outside this compound, be selfish, be cunning, be an asshole, for they are aliens and might just as well not exist.

      This is a traditional Chinese thinking that even the cultural revolution couldnt break up, and would only change when every single chinese emancipates from the collective or family he is part of.
      It wont be easy, since the traditional collective structure (with the family being a part of it) was always the vital security for the individual in a hostile and unforgiving world, so the core problem still lies in the overall poverty of the Chinese society, that forces the individual to be part of a microscopic collective instead of staying independent and become part of the macroscopic collective, being the whole society.

      Only when the overall living conditions and human development of China were to improve to a high degree, Chinese people will start being more respectful to each other, as already seen in some Tier 1 cities, where the people are overall nicer and welcoming than those from a provincial capital.

      • dim mak

        Hmph, well on their way to becoming liberal pussies, no doubt. Pity wealth makes most people soft, would prefer to have it both ways.

  • {after a few hours under the hood} Ref trots out into the intersection, “After further review, the call is reversed.”

    • anon

      Hahaha

  • 平凡人

    This shows how most people think in China today, quick money. Money seems to be the most important thing now for the majority in China. Sad…

  • tai wai

    Never trust anyone over 30.

    • eattot

      hahahaha! so funny and true,especially men.

      • Little Wolf

        I’m over 30 :-(

        • BARACK OBAMA

          i dont trust you —

          • mr. wiener

            I’ve always wondered what people who said ” never trust anyone over 30″ say after they themselves reach their 30’s? They change their tune fast I think.

          • Little Wolf

            I wouldn’t really trust anyone under 30 if it was something important.

    • El Puma R.

      never trust anyone. period.

      • eattot

        哈,your in period? good to know!

        • El Puma R.

          哈哈哈 you’ve been waiting to get back at me , right dear? I’ve been getting man-periods since I got to China. Last one will be next year. thank god.

  • bert

    Obviously the “old” man is at fault. Looks how he drives into the intersection. He clearly has no idea what brakes are. He just goes buzzing into the intersection hoping that nobody will force him to slow down. Well, guess what old man, you need to obey the rules too. So he fell over. Sorry about that but it’s your own fault.

    The boy helping him is a good kid.

    I also like the fat guy running his grandchild across the street at the last second before the buses come through.

  • yesyes

    ‘Little Weiner Little Weiner!!!!!!!”

    ‘Yes Big Pu’

    ‘Get out of the Audi and stomp that old man’s head in.’

    ‘Big Pu?’

    ‘Get out of the Audi and stomp that old man’s head in!!!!’

    ‘Why don’t we just keep on driving? Our licence plate is fake and nobody’s going to follow us.’

    ‘GoddamnitLittleWeiner!!!!! Get out and stomp that old fucker’s head in.’

    ‘Yes Big Pu.’

  • Castro

    Song of the Article:

    ” People are Strange ”

    The Doors

  • hacienda

    acting like jews!

    • Getrealson

      “Acting like jews!”

      I don’t know why but I laughed so hard when I read that. What an obscure reference… Idiot!

      • hacienda

        lol. and they said jews are hard to single out.

  • Eric

    Dear society,

    The time has come to stop lying. It is 2012 and there are cameras everywhere. Being caught lying is a disgrace; making an honest statement when you are in the wrong shows honor in your character. Lying when you are in the wrong shows weakness and cowardice in your character. And someone ALWAYS knows when you are lying…maybe not everyone, but always someone.

    This accident could have been avoided if the driver stopped at his red light before proceeding to turn right on red. This is the law in the West and having this law enforced here would protect countless pedestrians (aka mothers, brothers, children) and would make living in China a whole lot more pleasant. Stopping your car when someone enters a crosswalk is also a law in some states in the US but maybe one step at a time.

    When I got my driver’s license test in 2010 in Shanghai I learned that the maximum sentence for leaving the scene of an accident is a lifetime ban on driving privileges. I wonder how often that sentence is handed down and how is it enforced? If you actually want a better city or a better life, starting to enforce moving violations would make a huge impact. The program would even be able to pay for itself with the fines it generated.

    Win

    Regards,

    Eric Carlson
    Hongqiao/Gubei

  • bscalled

    looked like the old man was driving too fast and almost got hit by a car pulling out but was on the right of way because he was going straight – whereas the old man was making a turn but going too fast, and almost got hit. afterwards, he mistaken the driver of the car who tried to help him for the one that almost hit him because they were both dark color. the old man was wrong twice – once for his driving, and once for his accusations of the wrong man. he’d be wrong three times if he doesn’t apologize to the good samaritan. china really needs to invest in drivers ed – after all, they have the worst reputation in the world for their driving.

  • I want to also point out that at 00:41 sec of the clip, there is this other old person crossing the road with a young boy who also did not follow the traffic lights and rushed across the street just as the lights turned green – very very dangerous!
    If the seniors do not teach our young ones, can we blame them for disregarding rules and regulations of the country? Don’t always blame the government. Look at ourselves first …

  • typingfromwork

    More examples of traffic retardedness in China. At least this one has a happy ending.

  • why don’t chinese people help others in this kind of incidents..??? :O most of them are going pass pretending they don’t see it !!! :( where are Chinese people’s moral values ??? :( so sad..

  • Li RuiKe

    The government is trying to help control the traffic. (Usually, I’m quite critical of those admittedly corrupt public bosses. Watch out for sarcasm.) Notice the fence down the middle of the road. Why? Because confused, uneducated, only-person-in-China, the-horn-works-better-than-the-mirrors drivers drive all over roads without fences. Controlling them with laws doesn’t work. Why not? Because the rulers are above the law, meaning above the police, and can do whatever they want. And, oh, it’s communism, so if the rulers are irresponsible, we can all be irresponsible. Ethics, morals, cultural norms come from the top.
    I diverged from defending the traffic bureaucrats. Sorry. The traffic cameras are also a step in the right direction. They can anonymously issue tickets to law breakers using the cameras. (The powerful never have to pay them, of course.) The cameras, as in this case, can prove that a Good Samaritan is really not the perpetrator.
    The streets of China are chaotic. People walk whereever they want. Even when there are fences, every day you can see people, sometimes carrying babies, walking down the middle of busy roads and climbing over fences. The old coots on tricycles have no regard for lights, signs, moving traffic, other pedestrians. The rich don’t care who they hit because they can always charge the victims lots of money for the damage and blood stains on their imported cars. Police and judges are in their pockets.
    But don’t lose hope. With more and higher fences, and more and sharper video cameras, the streets of China will eventually become safe.

  • Misaki

    >The good people can’t afford to drive good cars, and those who drive good cars are all not good people.

    “As long as I only spend my money on a super-expensive house, I can have a clear conscience.”

    I read somewhere that Chinese banks have a very loose attitude toward loans (to local governments I think it was?), because more money leads to growth. Apparently the conservative candidate for the upcoming US presidential elections has promised to blame China for currency manipulation on his first day in office… I wonder what China would do if its exports to the US decreased. Maybe spend some of its foreign currency reserves?

  • David Fieldman

    With the high-definition cameras in operation, couldn’t the police do a “grab” of the Audi’s license plate number?

  • Rick West

    I did not read all the comments but I disagree that the old man was taking advantage of the situation. It may be he was confused, it happening quickly and him in pain, and the boy who helped, his car was in the position after his turn to be the car that caused the accident and the boys car looked dark so I think the old man made a mistake of identity.

  • stupid yellow banana

    Chinese logic, he who helps is held liable.

  • kodi

    Lying piece of shit! I still say ordinary citizens should have guns in China. I would feel much more comfortable being shot and knowing who the enemy is rather than them hiding behind fake smiles and sweet words while trying to lie and cheat at every turn. 10 years of guns in China would solve more than one problem at once. Kill off many of the worthless cheaters and also provide a much needed means of population control….. That could mean 50 years of progress compressed into 10 years! However, guns may make Chinese more violent than they already are. Forbid the cheaters may even win!!!!! Damn it to hell, at least just let me have a gun. Two years of consulting and negotiation with Chinese government officials and bosses has resulted in my loss of respect for their (not Chinese peoples, but rather those specific individual’s) lives. Some of these guys need to have guns to their heads otherwise they will not play fair by any means. No wonder Western powers employed “Gun Boat Diplomacy!” They were here and tried to trade fair and do business, so they got frustrated and finally decided to “force” the issue.

    Just frustrated……… Better to talk about it than to do it…..

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