Child Pees in Shanghai Subway, Father Argues with Angry Crowd

Video of a fight between a young man and Shanghai Metro passengers after his child peed in the subway.

On QQ, NetEase, Phoenix Online, People’s Daily Online, Xinahuanet:

Couple’s Infant Urinating in Subway Incites Public Anger, Husband Flying-Kicks Female Passenger

Eastday reporter Wang Ming August 23rd report: Following the denouncements of many netizens incited by the “two women fighting over a seat exposed” video, last night, a “couple allows infant to urinate in subway inciting public anger, young man flying-kicks female passenger” video was made public on the internet, inciting even more waves of condemnation by netizens. This reporter note that various major verified Weibo accounts that had forwarded/reshared the video all collected several thousand comments, with nearly all of them uniformly criticizing this extremely uncivilized incident. What’s strange is that after the young man that was the child’s father incited the public’s anger, he even called his “little buddies” claiming: “I’ve gotten into a bit of trouble in the subway, hurry and bring some people over!”

Immediately after opening the video, this reporter saw a middle-aged man wearing red and blue stripes saying: “Enough, enough, stop arguing.” At the same time, to the side sat a young man in a grey t-shirt mumbling: “MD making a fuss over with/over a child!” In the video was also a woman saying “by what right”, apparently also saying some other things, but which could not be made out. Immediately, the youth in the grey t-shirt jumped up: “Motherfucking, I’ll beat you to death!”

Overall, the situation shown in the 6-minute long video was more or less: On the Shanghai Line 3 Metro, a young couple holding their infant had urinated in the subway train car as it pleased, getting on a nearby passenger, causing a dispute between the two parties, with the young man wildly cursing “motherfucker“, and even flying kicking the female passenger he was arguing with. His actions incited condemnation from the majority of the people in the subway train car who believed that it is uncivilized to simply urinate where one pleases in the subway, even for a baby.

Video of a fight between a young man and Shanghai Metro passengers after his child peed in the subway.

The young male’s flying kick against a female passenger.

However, it appears that this young man as well as the middle-aged man beside him did not accept the criticisms of the passengers, resulting in another conflict with an older Shanghainese gentleman. Owing to this old gentleman being unable to keep his silence, saying: “Children can’t piss (in the subway) either, and should also [at least] use a bag.” The young man surprisingly then said: “MD! It’s none of your fucking business!” Due to the young man’s constant crude language, the old gentleman also became incensed, “How is it none of my fucking business? Am I not also riding the subway? Did I also not buy a ticket? I expect a certain environment…” Thereupon, the young man and the middle-aged man both verbally attacked the old gentleman, and were it not for other passengers stopping them, physical blows would’ve landed upon the old gentleman’s body as well.

Video of a fight between a young man and Shanghai Metro passengers after his child peed in the subway.

The young man pointing at an old gentleman who was trying to help stop the fight calling him a “motherfucker“.

What is even more outrageous is that upon seeing their own behavior being frowned upon, after inciting the public’s anger, these two men surprisingly then took out their mobile phones to call people over to help them. This reporter heard the youth in grey in the video bring up his mobile phone and say: “I’ve gotten into a bit of trouble in the subway, hurry and bring some people over!” Seeing this, the child’s mother that had largely stayed silent throughout the entire incident finally opened her mouth, saying: “If you have the guts, fight yourself, don’t call people” In the face of the two men’s actions, yet another passenger stepped out: “How many people can you call? However many, it’ll still not be as many as us passengers.” There was also a passenger tried to reason [with them]: “In this day and age of Weibo, be aware of your behavior.

Video of a fight between a young man and Shanghai Metro passengers after his child peed in the subway.

The two men each took out their mobile phones to call people to come to the subway to “back them up”.


Comments from QQ:

腾讯西安市网友 在探索…:

Sigh, a child truly being unable to hold their urine can still be understood/forgiven, but the key here is that the parents did not control their child, that urine had gotten onto other people. As a parent, shouldn’t you acknowledge fault and apologize? This is the most basic of courtesy/manners as a person.

腾讯网友 无去来处:

Author [of the article], are you really “using words to kill someone” [unfairly defaming someone]? A half-year-old child, is it deserving of you people attacking him like this? Those who finish watching the video all know, it isn’t easy for the migrant worker couple, but [everyone] is repeatedly criticizing them, and wasn’t the man at the end also saying the child is a dog? For you human garbage who has lived decades to scold a child that has just entered entered the world for several months, you’re simply an animal.

腾讯网友 skylin:

Actually, the entire incident started because the child peed. It must be said that the child’s father is young, handles thing a little extremely, and indeed had fault, but everyone should also consider, when other people make a mistake, are we able to use a tolerant/forgiving tone when pointing out fault, especially in public? Adults and children both have a sense of self-respect. When you use a condescending attitude to point out another person’s mistakes, I trust anyone would find it hard to accept. When a father is scolded in front of his own child, and if you were a father, how would you feel? A lot of impulsive actions will catalyze in this kind of circumstance. In short, I hope everyone can be a bit more forgiving, criticize less, because after all everyone has times where they’ve made mistakes. This is not about not correcting faults, but a kind of dealing with things with as much tolerance and forgiveness as possible, as this will surely save effort and lead to better results.

腾讯盐城市网友 梦,:

Was this necessary? To expose this? That’s a child and that old man was cursing their child as a dog. What if they cursed your child as a dog? Also, if the child were able to hold his urine, it would no longer be a child. Moreover, the old man telling them to have on them a bag for human waste, what if they had simply forgotten, then what? You think you’re so high and mighty just because you live in a big city? This is social morality/civic-mindedness? There’s no need for these things to be hyped up on the internet.

腾讯宿迁市网友 MWG:

Also that female passenger in the beginning, you’re just trying to pick a quarrel. Yes, a child’s pee is dirty, but it was just a child. Whatever the adult’s mistake, just mention it and leave it at that, you don’t have to argue until there is some result and even if you keep arguing, what kind of result can be achieved? You can say some things, but if they don’t have this awareness or perhaps this character, you don’t need to go on tut-tutting without end. If you keep on tut-tutting without end, what you’ll ultimately get is a beating! This is you asking for it.

腾讯厦门市网友 海阔天空:

Shanghainese people sure are petty, without any tolerance/forgiveness at all. Isn’t it nothing more than a child taking a pee? Is it necessary for this many people to go attack a young couple? So wrong.

腾讯蚌埠市网友 菠萝菠萝蜜:

If it’s a baby, if the parent doesn’t have a diaper or an emergency plastic bag or similar receptacle, and although urinating as one pleases on the ground is improper, it can still be understood/forgiven. The way some supermarkets and public places provide children’s chamber pots is correct, and the subway can also learn from them.
It’s something that shouldn’t have been a big deal, so certain passengers’ reactions were somewhat too extreme; of course the child’s parents should also be calmer and more polite, because even though it was something that couldn’t be helped, their own actions were still uncivilized.

腾讯深圳市网友 withlove:

I have the first sofa…! A child peeing is no big deal, just let the cleaning lady take a mop and mop it up. Just treat every Chinese person as your a member of your family. Just treat [the child] as your own family’s nephew. Using a bag isn’t very good, [curbing] white pollution begins with everyone. It’ll affect those after you. Just be more open-minded. If you all have such guts, let’s drag you out to go to war. When China has to go to war some day, I hope you people will still be like this…

腾讯网友 文文:

Fucking it’s just a small child. You think they can hold it just because you say they can? Are adults these days all so argumentative/unreasonable?

腾讯南平市网友 *!~梦幻~:

Passengers with children, who get motion-sickness, who are drunk should uniformly bring their own or be provided with a plastic sanitary bag [such as on airplanes]. A gei li line: “How many people can you call? However many, it’ll still not be as many as us passengers.”

What do you think? How would you have reacted?

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  • Joey

    Maybe if they actually trained their kids to hold their pee, instead of cutting holes in their pants, this would be less of an issue.

    • SonofSpermcube

      Seriously, dogs can do it.

    • wallimo

      You can’t train an infant… But instead of trying to ‘train’ them how about putting a nappy on them. Can’t afford disposable nappies? Make some cloth ones. it still does the same job. Just need to clean them yourself. Your talking about a baby. That baby could be anything from the President of China, to a world famous scientist… bit early to be writing it off I think.

      • vincent_t

        er…but the boy is not an infant anymore right? older than a toddle i would say

        • wallimo

          lol, if that kid is older thatn a toddler they make them small in China, I’d say that kid is no older than one year old.

          • biggj

            The kids a chinese 4. His dad only looks 12.

        • wallimo

          Thats a pretty small toddler, I would guess under 1 year old

    • Kiwi

      It’s portable potty training :D

  • Germandude

    Well, cutting toe nails, puking, begging, changing dipers etc. are a common scene here. So throwing in a bit of baby pee into the mix won’t hurt if you ask me…

    • xuedi

      quite true, a baby peeing is not the worst i have seen in Chinese subways ^^

    • Kevin Yu

      Though it is changing, I have to say. Last time I saw a little report about this on CCTV and the newsreporter said such behaviour is unacceptable behaviour on a subway. It was just a few days ago and I was kinda surprised to see such thing on CCTV.

      Though I wonder how many people who do such shit even watch the news (even if its chinese…)…

    • narsfweasels

      On Saturday a little girl was puking her guts up all over the floor of a line 2 train, I offered her father a bag, but he said no thank you as they didn’t need it…

      …I wonder if he thought I was suggesting he put his daughter in a bag and carry her home?

      • The Enlightened One

        Hahaha…. no, we don’t want no bag!

        You smell that piss and puke on the floor and you like it foreigner! You like it good!

  • Brett

    All I see are a few peasants riding a train. Whoopdee doo

  • SonofSpermcube

    Last time I rode a sleeper, my bunkmates had a baby they REPEATEDLY let piss on the floor in our little cubicle. They seemed to think it was funny every time I went to get a mop to clean up the piss. Don’t worry, there’s more where that came from. FFS.

    • wafflestomp

      Good job being a beta.

      • mr.wiener

        The alternative being to pitch a fit and threaten to call your mates? If that means being an Alpha then I’m staying a Beta.
        That said I thought most people on the train were quite considerate and didn’t stomp these idjits to death like they deserved….well, they didn’t meet violence with violence anyway. There is hope for China after all.

      • POS

        You just don’t understand Chinese culture wafflekhan SMH

    • biggj

      No one slammed the kid on the floor? I don’t believe you then. hahaha

  • MrT

    Always call their mates on the phone, piss weak cnts.

    • MrT

      poor kid at to sit there and endure that.
      Mother and father look like they spent all their money on gay hairdos

    • slob

      IKR, “I’m in a bit of trouble” aka I don’t want to admit I’m wrong, I am retarded, my son is going to be an inhumane pleb like myself, please bring the guys. Chances are they don’t even have backup and they’re just talking shit. You might see 2 guys turn up confused like “what’s going on?” Why do they all think they’re mafia bosses with hundreds of on-call bodyguards?

      • MrT

        wonder what the “mates” response time is like, ifs it anything like the police here, well…

      • Beijinger

        exactly, they won’t do shit.

        chinks are such pussies.

  • slob

    What’s so difficult about diapers/nappies? At least use a cloth or something. Shit, when I was a kid my mum used old t-shirts as nappies for me and my brothers. Can’t these animals do the same? If I were on that train I would’ve whipped my cock out and pissed on the guy to see how he likes it.

    • Alexander

      Yes, diapers, especially the disposable ones that can absorb alot of liquid such as “huggies” are amazing products. Good mothers and fathers know to always pack an extra diaper and baby wipes. That’s the difference between humans, we use proper bathroom facilities and things like diapers, dogs and cats don’t. To let your child piss on the floor is to treat your child like a dog……

      • ismhmr

        In China parents don’t buy diapers. They have their kids wear holes in their trousers and teach them to use the ground. I have seen kids crap in the middle of the sidewalk here, and their parents just see it as normal.

        • mr.wiener

          In the countryside maybe. In the subway in Shanghai?

          • AaronJH

            I was in an outdoor restaurant at a resort in Hainan. A kid obviously needed to go to the toilet, so his mother took him over to a planter box in the middle of the restaurant, dangled him over it, and let him do his business.

            Nobody batted an eyelid, despite the fact that the urine ended up missing the planter box and pooling under a nearby table. Which my wife and I were sitting at.

            We complained, and the staff just told us to “calm down, it’s just a kid”. They thought we were over-sensitive for insisting that the mother should have taken her child to the bathroom that was located right next to the restaurant.

            My wife mumbled something about “filthy southerners”, and we left.

            And that wasn’t the only time we were urinated on in Hainan. When visiting the Guanyin in Sanya, a mother dangled her child over a railing to let him pee, not realising that there was a walkway beneath the railing. Which we were walking along.

            We were pretty happy to get back to the NorthEast, where being peed on isn’t a daily hazard.

          • Kai

            That’s kinda strange I think because this phenomenon isn’t remotely rare in the Northeast either. It’s not just Southerners.

          • vincent_t

            Yeah i thought so too. I used to stay in Tianjin for 6 months and definitely seen much more “kids shitting in the middle of sidewalk” in TJ than SH or Xiamen.

          • AaronJH

            I spend a lot of time in Harbin, and haven’t really seen much public urination there. Kids do walk around pants-free at home, but not so much in public.

            Perhaps because their bits would freeze off if they did walk around outside in Winter with gaping holes in their trousers.

          • Kai

            Hah, I had thought about the colder weather angle when I wrote my comment earlier but otherwise I think the phenomenon is pretty prevalent in the Northeast too.

          • AaronJH

            I think living in such a cold place does make a difference. But there certainly is the stereotype amongst those I know from Harbin (including my wife and her family) that the further south you get, the filthier and more crime-ridden things are. It’s probably based more on parochialism than reality.

            However, I’ve never seen people take cleanliness as serious as those in Harbin. It seems they have more cleaners per capita than just about anywhere I’ve seen.

            I consider myself a clean person, but I’m actually frustrated sometimes. I swear, they all have OCD.

            Needless to say, public urination isn’t very common.

          • Kai

            Yeah, lots of interesting stereotypes in China. If the stereotype of Harbin people being serious about indoor cleanliness holds up, I’m all for them migrating and sharing the wealth!

          • Atlas

            Been to Harbin a few times this year. It’s true: much cleaner overall, especially inside.

          • 二奶头发

            it’s hard to keep a city clean when its source of electricity comes from coal. the coal dust is everywhere. I did notice the street cleaner trucks out a few times a day plus they have garbage collection everyday. One thing harbin has a problem with is spitting (indoors and out) and smoking indoors. I noticed that when I was there this year.

          • Fanduril

            Smoking indoors only a problem in Harbin? They smoke in fucking hospitals everywhere in the country.

          • AaronJH

            Yeah. Signs everywhere about the new smoking ban, but it is absolutely never enforced.

            But I guess if you can put up with the winter air, when the coal-fired heaters are running, then a bit of smoke is nothing.

          • Probotector

            I used to try to enforce it in the school where I first worked; gave up after a while.

          • linette lee
          • SonofSpermcube

            Under 5 coats of paint and 10 layers of photoshop no one would be able to tell.

          • Kai

            I suppose Shanghai is considered southern by, well, everyone north of it? Shanghai has enough strength of identity to not simply be lumped into “south” or “north” generalizations though. People don’t denigrate people in Shanghai as “southerners” but as, heh, “Shanghainese”.

          • Blarsd

            I think the divider is the Chang Jiang or as it’s also called Jiangtze river. Also, with the huge migration to Shanghai it’s hard to tell what who is indeed a Shanghainese.

          • I never thought you could think so hard about something so unimportant

          • SonofSpermcube

            Northerners don’t take it to the same extremes. Maybe all that holding it in as babies leads to pent-up aggression that causes them to be so fighty as adults.

          • Kai

            Heh, I’m not sure, I haven’t really compared the behavior that closely other than being fairly certain it’s reasonably common both in the north and south. I can agree with things like weather influencing how often it might be seen in public at certain times of the year just like I could agree with population density influencing likelihood of seeing a phenomenon but otherwise this behavior is more related to a habit developed from a rural background clashing with relatively recent urbanization.

            As for the stereotype of Northeasterners being prone to violence, is it because they’re overly aggressive or the southerners too wimpy? ;)

          • AaronJH

            Probably alcohol. Northeasterners love to drink.

            When I met my in-laws, I was basically told: “Drink until you pass out, otherwise they’ll think you’re soft”.

          • Kai

            Hah, yeah, though as unhealthy as that is, as long as no one gets hurt, it’s all in good fun and something I can appreciate. It’s funny how poisoning oneself, making oneself vulnerable, is seemingly a universal way to break the ice and bring people together.

            So did you get drunk under the table by your in-laws or did you manage to hold your own and do your background proud? There’s the stereotype that Asians can’t hold their liquor, often because a lot of them get “Asian-glow” when drinking, but I’ve met a lot of people with some pretty high tolerances in China who could definitely go toe-to-toe with certain nationalities more often stereotyped as hardcore drinkers.

          • AaronJH

            I quickly drank one of my wife’s uncles under the table. He was gone after a couple of glasses of baiju. He went red-faced, then went for a lie down.

            At that stage, I felt absolutely no buzz at all, so I started getting cocky, drinking the baiju like it was beer. I’d put an inch in the bottom of another uncle’s glass, then they’d half-fill mine, and we’d both “gan bei” them down. Then on to the next uncle.

            Another uncle started getting a face like a tomato, and disappeared.

            Then, figuring it would dilute the baiju, I drank quite a few bottles of beer.

            In the process, another uncle went down. There was one left, and he was huge, and didn’t seem fazed at all, even though between the five of us, we’d downed a huge bottle of baiju and about two dozen beers.

            Meanwhile, my father-in-law was over to the side of the table, telling us we were all insane. He doesn’t drink.

            Then, I got up to go to the bathroom and noticed that floor was a lot further down than I remembered, and that all the furniture seemed to be moving around the room. I just managed to get there in time to throw up. My wife and mother-in-law came and helped, and I don’t remember anything for the next few hours.

            The next day, my mother-in-law was very happy that I’d held my own quite well, even though the uncles were “ganging up” on me. My father-in-law was happy that I’d managed to drink two of his wife’s family members under the table, even if he’s not a drinker himself. So it was a success.

          • Kai

            LOL, that’s awesome. I’m glad you passed such a rite of passage. Definitely no shame if you only lose to someone physically bigger than you and has more meat to soak up the poison.

            The beer doesn’t dilute the baijiu, you’re just adding less potent alcohol to more potent alcohol! It’d only dilute in the sense if you’re drinking less baijiu than you would have while you’re at it.

            Your in-laws sound pretty cool, the mother-in-law’s sense of fairness, and the father-in-law’s gleeful bias against his own in-laws. Great example of how similar we can all be.

          • AaronJH

            I figured it would help me pass the liquor through my system more quickly, plus, as you say, avoid the baijiu for a bit.

            I found out it doesn’t work that way.

          • Kai

            I think your liver and kidneys will still process the alcohol into your bloodstream even if you piss more. Only way to get rid of alcohol I think is vomiting anything that hasn’t been digested and metabolized already.

            But yeah, if it helped avoid baijiu, then at least you’re slowing down the intake of alcohol. It’s entirely possible to get alcohol poisoning if you’re not careful. Anyway, fun story, thanks for sharing and rock on.

          • Obviously, someone’s wife is a Northerner.

          • I saw it almost daily when I was in the north east, of course, in summer. No countryside, there are almost 9 million people in Changchun. it is a little backwards I know, but the air is cleaner than the bigger cities, food as well, in china you can’t beat dongbei when it comes to food… and kids taking shits on the sidewalk.

            They also cough freely when riding the bus, why cover your mouth when you can cough on the back of some foreigner’s neck ? or why save your spit? it’s a restaurant, they’ll clean later.

            once in winter this 姥姥 was riding the bus with her grandson right behind me and they opened a can of 臭豆腐 . 好不好吃? said the old lady, the stink was so bad I was choking so I asked her 阿姨你为什么想杀孩子? 太臭了, she said out loud “laowai doesn’t know 臭豆腐” , we all had a laugh, they kept eating and I kept choking ’cause the window was frozen and I was unable to open it.
            xD

          • Chicken soup

            Have you not been been to Beijing? Even though its not the “North East”, that shit still happens in Beijing all the time.

          • 12345

            Your wife’s “filthy southerners” is pretty bad too. She can be angry but she shouldn’t be overgeneralization and insult half of the population. You should bad about your wife too.

          • yyyyyy

            so your from dongbei? and filthy southerners? yeah says someone showers once every three months lmfao

          • angry laowai

            its a whole mainland problem!! not just south…..if anything…south is better! ive seen endless public urination in beijing.

          • hess

            I saw kids crapping on the sidewalk daily in Shijiazhuang, and that aint rural.

          • mr.wiener

            I stand corrected.

          • hoppy1

            I saw it today in Shiziazhuang. I’ve seen it in every Chinese city I have lived and the middle to larger cities aren’t a lot better than the smaller ones. Personally, I am happy that disposable diapers are not used by the majority here. There is enough waste as it is and there really is no room for the daily disposal of several million soiled nappies. But what about the old cloth nappies?

          • Alexander

            That’s what’s fire is for….. both disposable and cloth diapers burn well especially if you add a little cheap baijiu to them…

          • Kevin Yu

            But, at least according to my experience, Shijiazhuang was the most dirty city I have ever been to in China.

          • hess

            Amen to that

          • linette lee

            No way. hahaha…..lol.

          • ismhmr

            Yup. That is where I live.. People just won’t buy diapers for their kids.

            People here will hoard as much money as they can, and Shanghai people are known to be the most money hungry out of everyone in China ( And that is pretty bad.)

          • Alexander

            Many do buy diapers for their kids, there are many Chinese brand and foreign brand diapers sold in stores.

          • Blarsd

            Shanghai is a biz hub for sure so money is understandably a big thing, however, I would argue that it’s worse in Hangzhou and Wenzhou when it comes to being “money hungry”. Still, Shanghai is pretty high up on the list. Actually, all Chinese probably are quite money hungry, it’s a face thing I guess. I’m pretty money hungry even though I’m not from Shanghai and I don’t see that as a bad thing. It makes me get up in the morning and work a lot to get the things I want. Remember the old tune “money makes the world go round, the world go round…..”

          • Kai

            Less in Shanghai, but there are a lot of migrant workers in Shanghai and the difference in habits and expectations is the basis for the ongoing Shanghainese-Waidiren War

          • Alva

            In the subway in Shanghai also, I see it every single day, they where those pants and no diapers, at max 2 years old kids go to the potty by themselves

    • abednengo

      times like this we need to call the Anhui police in the previous story…

    • The Enlightened One

      Too true, I guess he spent all his money on his iphone, those amazing pants and “how-to-kick-a-bitch” self-defence classes.

    • Repatriated

      The first day the metro opened in Hangzhou…the “Christening” began…
      What’s really pathetic about the photo is that the doors are open, and there’s a WC within just a few yards…

      • 12345

        That’s one of the problem when the parents are working and playing while the grandparents take care of the children.

      • angry laowai

        parents need to be more responsible in China….if you have no time to bring them up in a civilised way, then don’t have kids….simple!!!

    • Whatever

      ” Can’t these animals do the same”
      well, “animals”…seriously? your choice of word reflects how you see the Chinese people. Clearly you don’t understand Chinese and use your western mindset while sitting on your moral high horse judging people you don’t truly understand..never bother trying to understand anyway. I am overseas Chinese and grow up worshiping western culture..listening to rock music, Hollywood movies and stuffs, I can play ‘Star spangled banner’ on my electric guitar Hendrix style..there were days when i tried hard to nail those Led Zep solos.. but the older i grow the sicker I become of western people. yeah, not all of you though…but people like you are legion for they are many..I guess that’s how you people view us..animals..ugly looking sub human..

      • bert

        hahahahaha whatever. People who generally poop/pee in public vs people who generally don’t poop/pee in public.

    • angry laowai

      chinese are too cheap to buy them…they complain that they are too expensive for an “unneeded annoyance”. Sums up chinese people if you ask me

  • vonskippy

    “Calling friends for backup”

    Bwahahahahahaa. This China is what you’re breeding? A bad parent, a stupid person, and a coward – all in person. Good job – yes the world is trembling at the future might of China – bwahahahahahahahaha.

    • Alex

      Love it when I see a fight and the first thing they do is intimidate each other with the calls. Then wait 10-30 mins till the “gang” has showed up, and then the most intimidating wins.

      Pussies.

      • The Enlightened One

        See, you can learn a lesson from this.

        If it seems like you are going to get into a fight. Don’t sit there waiting around for it to resolve itself. It won’t, chances are the foreigner will be blamed and you will have to pay for something.

        Don’t wait for the guy to make a phone call and get his entire family and friends over there. They will ant rush you and usually use weapons (if it comes to blows).

        Quickly get out of the situation, if it means knocking out the Chinese- flock-of-seagulls-guy while he is on his iPhone but can’t afford diapers… then do it!

        • YungBruce

          You’re still poor and uneducated with an ugly wife.

          • The Enlightened One

            And you’re still stalking me and you’re still boring.

          • YungBruce

            It’s not hard to miss you.
            Boring to you is hilarious to me.

          • mr.wiener

            Not nice.

          • YungBruce

            Guess my description chafed you a little as well.
            Laughed my ass off when I saw you became a mod. This was a promising site a few years back. What a cess pool

        • biggj

          That guy is not calling anyone. At least not anyone that will come and help. It’s a scare tactic. I would have called him out on it. This is just little cunt. Flock of seagulls….priceless hahaha.

        • wongasu

          I would have smashed his head into the glass window couple time.

    • Fanduril

      Please don’t hurt the feelings of Chinese people. Drink hot water and have happy life!

  • firebert5

    What’s that they say about “two Wongs…”

    • Atlas

      Usually, you only have to ways to solve a problem like this:

      The wong way and the white way.

      • MrT

        two wongs dont make a white!

        • MrT

          not even 6!

        • Mighty曹

          Two Wongs don’t make a Wright.

          • Atlas

            Damn Wright about that!

          • Mighty曹

            Wright on!!!

    • Kai

      I hope you guys aren’t the ones who complain about Chinese people going “helloooooo” whenever they see a white person. This is essentially the same behavior.

      • Atlas

        You’re right. No wait, you’re not. I’m not doing wing wong jokes when I see Chinese people in person simply because it sucks.

        Those are jokes, online, in English, on an English board.

        • Kai

          …an English board shared with Chinese readers and commenters.

          Let’s not forget that most of the people who run the site are also Chinese.

  • lonetrey / Dan

    Honestly, if someone has this rude to me intentionally in the public, I’d probably confront them physically. I’m a little surprised this guy didn’t get stomped into the ground.

    • Irvin

      I would wait until the next stop then punch him out and run out the train, not like he can find me.

      • Kevin Yu

        There are cameras everywhere and I guess it wouldnt be too hard to find a foreigner afterwards. And I am sure because you are a foreigner a lot of people would run after you and the news would be “Peaceful chinese got hit by laowai”.

        • Irvin

          I’m foreign but they don’t know that, since I’m asian. >:)

          • mr.wiener

            ……until you open your mouth. Also they can tell by the way you dress and I’m hoping you don’t have a “cute” hair cut like this guy.

          • Irvin

            I’m in guangzhou and I speak both mandarin and cantonese I’m a ninja hiding in plain sight >:)

          • mr.wiener

            “Look everyone, a Ninja! He’s Japanese, lets beat him to death!!”

          • biggj

            You’re like James Bond then…. you have a license to kill.

          • mr.wiener

            For the longest time I thought the chorus was “Secret asian man”

          • KAMIKAZIPILOT

            Haha, not sure if you’re serious but I also though those were the words for the longest time. After a while though it didn’t really make any sense.

          • mr.wiener

            “One ton tomato, we got a one ton tomato….One ton tomaaaato, we got a one ton tomaaato…..”

            “Excuse me please while I kiss this guy”

            The list goes on.

    • I love Sexy Chinese girls

      What will happen it you hit someone here in china? Will you go to jail or something? I

      • moody

        You most probably will lose your Visa

      • Lord_Helmet

        Lots of things. Most common would pay a fine for whatever damage you did to the person, if they agree with the compensation then it is squashed.
        2.Go to the police station and settle it there.
        3. Get surrounded by every Chinese person in the area and get verbally abused.
        4. Get surrounded and beat by all the people in the area.

        Suggestions: never let them get to the point of taking out the phone, smash the phone then smash his face and get the fuck out of dodge.

        • I love Sexy Chinese girls

          If I’m not mistaken. The one who hits first is the one at fault. So most fight goes verbally cursing first until one of them gets out of control and that’s when the real physical fight begin.

          BTW, I love your suggestions.

          • Lord_Helmet

            I have heard the same about the first punch rule. I just wouldn’t trust it unless you really knew that you had a solid and honest witness.

          • maja

            if I understand it correctly, part A compensate part B, then part B compensate part A, the amount of every compensation being decided upon… local wisdom?
            I’m completely sure there’s much more in the law, but I guess actual implementation is something like this.

      • wongasu

        actually nothing will happen, chinese police are incompetent as fuck, as long you don’t mess with any of their respectable members.

  • Zappa Frank

    i wonder how come i’ve never seen such kind of problems anywhere else. Apparently for chinese, also reading comments, is normal let child pee everywhere in public..no diaper is even considered.
    i still remember a chinese of around 4years old peeing in a bag (at least) on an airplane because didn’t want to wait

  • yinshihai

    I don’t see why the parents couldnt have just got off at the next stop… distances from two subway stations are not far at all.

    • maja

      that’s what I think everytime I see a report about a pissing/defecating/throwing up/preaching-about-something incident in the subway… in this case it was a young toddler, it couldn’t be helped but with diapers.

  • Ana Belen Ruiz

    “I’ve gotten into a bit of trouble in the subway, hurry and bring some people over!”

    WTF!
    He even dares to kick a woman? what a lousy man.
    Poor cute baby with that kind of father…

    • The Enlightened One

      It just seems like every video I see about an altercation with a man and a woman, the guy always has a to take a mad dash at a woman. The stereotype about the men here is becoming ever more and more justified.

      • Mighty曹

        I really wonder if it has something to do with coming out of communism. I’ve seen tons of videos out of Russia where men beat women as men.

        • Atlas

          I see it this way: If you were facing an opponent you know is stronger, braver and more clever than you in every possible way, you too would start fighting dirty and dash in the moment you see an opening.

          • Robert Rou

            So quick to forget about Vietnam already, huh? A group of guerilla fighters fighting off 2 superpowers in less than a generation. Fighting dirty? Yep, using chemical weapons aka Agent Orange and killing off civilians aka My Lai. Dont’ forget about the Gulf of Tonkin or the Pentagon Papers either.

          • Probotector

            I’m not sure why you use a political analogy of American bullying (true as it may be) in reference to a man bullying a woman, unless you feel bad because the man was Chinese and you feel your nationhood has been insulted because a fellow Chinese man has been criticised for his behaviour. Therefore you feel you need to attack a whole nation. In any case, Chinese are in no position to talk about human rights, illegal activity and bullying.

          • mr.wiener

            This seems to be Robert’s standard shtick, He baits westerners he feels are acting too superior.

        • Robert Rou

          The idea of a classless, stateless society develops wifebeaters? News to me.

          • Mighty曹

            Don’t wait for news. Observe.

    • Germandude

      The apple never falls far from the tree.

      • Mighty曹

        Always pick the low hanging fruits.

        • Germandude

          Nah, I prefer the firm ones if you know what I mean.

          • Mighty曹

            All the more reason to pick them before they fall and get bruised.

      • biggj

        When a shit apple falls from a shit apple tree and lands in a big pile of shit, it has no choice but to grow up to be another shit apple tree. ahaha The cycle continues.

      • Kiwi

        Not if it’s a tall tree

    • Mighty曹

      Even the old man knows these two pricks were posers. So funny when the old man says, “I’m scared to death!”.

      • Guang Xiang

        So we can stipulate that the cowardice level of the average Chinese man falls somewhere between ‘will beat woman’ and ‘won’t beat old man 2 vs 1’

        • Mighty曹

          The center point of those two levels is ‘talk tough and hope everyone leaves them alone’.

  • wafflestomp

    Beijing Cream reported the child actually hit another passenger with the pee.

    • Jahar

      yeah it says so here too

  • diverdude7

    friggin’ addicted to those mobile phones…. but actually kinda cool.. they can recede back into their mobile which is a quick, easy, accessible way to defuse things…
    these kids don’t know any better and probably should not have been chastised so vehemently. Buttttt,, I do have to make fun of his haircut, dress style, ear piercings, knock-off apple phone, necklace… many commented his income was low,,, but maybe china is becoming like US,, richest poor people in the world… money for ear piercings and a knock-off iPhone,, service too..

    his lady took it well. hope he appreciates her.

  • Irvin

    I wonder what would happen if he was arguing with the dude that kill the baby in beijing for parking space.

    • Mighty曹

      That dude would pick him up and slam him on the pavement. I hope.

  • Jeff

    Fucking Savages.

    • Germandude

      A that reminded me that I gotta watch “Apocalypse Now” again. Thanks!

      Actually, “Apocalypse Now” is what I am watching every day when using the metro.

      • Mighty曹

        Chopping off the head of the leader should end your daily nightmare.

        • Germandude

          I work my way up, starting with those responsible of regularly fucking up…

          • Mighty曹

            That will take forever. Especially in China.

          • Germandude

            Means my job is safe.

          • Mighty曹

            Haha! Job security!

  • pinkie

    Seriously, if dogs can be trained to hold their pee, why can’t parents teach their children to do the same? But to cut a hole in their pants and pee whenever they want so you’ll have less laundry to do. What lazy asses!

  • Charlton Heston

    Fucking Planet of The Apes.

    • Claude

      It’s a mad house! A mad house!: Chalk up another victory to the human spirit: Well, at least they haven’t tried to bite us.

      Memorable quotes from George Hamilton played by Charlton Heston in Planet of the Apes.

      • doggie

        “Take your stinking paws off me, you damn dirty ape!”

        • mr.wiener

          “They blew it up!…God damn you! Damn you to hell!”

      • Mighty曹

        Soylent Green is delicious! Soylent Green is delicious!!

  • Claude

    I’m angry about his hair. No, I’m Infuriated!

    • Mighty曹

      And that gangsta chain around his neck.

      • The Enlightened One

        And the tight ass, bright blue pants. I think this guy is a little confused.

        • Mighty曹

          All that and can’t afford a fucking diaper for the baby.

          • biggj

            I know he never bought those from the mens department. lol

      • biggj

        I wonder where he got those pants from, it’s fag night at the local bar and need something to wear. ahahaha

        • Mighty曹

          Doesn’t matter. When he steps into that bar those pants are coming right off.

  • death_by_ivory

    This child is an infant,early to potty train, correct.I understand there are a lot of people who dont want to use diapers for their kids.Do it at home!!!When you go out,have some decency and put a cloth around the kid.

  • Marcus Black

    All hail the magnificent result of five thousand years of civilisation. *bows to the establishment* Such a superior group of people. *stares in admiration*

  • Ami

    The best part about this is the baby’s face.

  • Alexander

    Holy molly these things are amazing!

    • Mighty曹

      Apparently this Justin Bieber wannabe prick has never heard of Huggies.

      • Scream_Writer

        Hmmm interesting point.

        • Mighty曹

          Just an astute observation.

          • Scream_Writer

            You’re good at those!

    • linette lee

      I want to ask the China chinese do they not use lady sanitary napkins when they have their period. Like I am sure they will not leave home without it right. So how can they leave home without a diaper on a child? There is no way you not use lady napkins just like no way you not put a diaper on a baby. Right?

      http://i01.i.aliimg.com/wsphoto/v0/1189614013/-font-b-Lady-b-font-sanitary-font-b-napkin-b-font-far-infrared-negative-ion.jpg

      • 1

        Many grandparents bring up the children. They didn’t have diapers back then so they don’t know. Some of the stupid parents don’t there are things called diapers, so they don’t do it. It happens. There are a lot of uneducated morons around.

  • Kevin Yu

    How come most of the chinese comments defend such behaviour? Sure its a kid, but fuck… just let the child wear a diaper, Then the dad is saying rude words in front of his own child.

    Sorry. Somehow I dont understand how the people try to defend this behaviour. And I am not sure if this one is a sarcastic comment or not:
    “A child peeing is no big deal, just let the cleaning lady take a mop and mop it up.”

    I guess its not. Typical chinese behaviour.
    “Better let someone else clean it. Its not a big deal then.”
    “Hey. I can just throw the trash on the street. At 4AM the cleaning ladies will come and clean it up!”

    Disgusting…

    • Mighty曹

      That validates the mentality of the general populace. Disgusting..

    • Jahar

      This is what blows my mind. they build buildings and whatnot to look beautiful and expensive, then they treat it all like garbage. then it’s falling apart and looks like crap in no time.

    • I love Sexy Chinese girls

      “Birds with the same feather flock together”

    • Kai

      Part of it is QQ’s demographics, which skews towards more “rural” or “low income, lower education” users than something like Weibo (which is by design more self-selecting).

      Part of it is the age-old dynamic between the “uncivlized country-bumpkins” versus the “arrogant city-slickers”. People end up dividing themselves into camps based on their identity and think their identity is being attacked by proxy of the actual behavior that started it all, so they attack the identity of the other side.

      For me, it was really irritating to see the “defenders” either fail to see or intentionally mischaracterize the argument as being about the child when it was clear to me that the argument is about the parents’ role. I suppose if you can understand everything that was said in the video, you could find some comments to justify thinking the other passengers were criticizing the baby but it seemed obvious to me that they were upset with the parents being ignorant of proper civic behavior, and then having the audacity to be defensive about it.

      Characterizing the people denouncing the incident as attacking the baby has the benefit of avoiding the real criticism, that parents shouldn’t just have their kids piss wherever especially in indoor enclosed places, and demonizing the other side as picking on a helpless victim. If you’re predisposed to resenting the other side already (the stereotypically haughty Shanghainese who look down their nose on waidiren), you don’t care about your whatever you did, which is invariably “no big deal” because most people you know do it also, and it is they who must be petty or condescending for making a fuss.

      Basically the people involved grew up with different values or sensitivities. In a way, you can’t really blame them because they don’t take the same things for granted. The environment they grew up in, the people, habits, and norms they grew up with differ. The Shanghainese simply can’t understand why anyone would piss or shit in an enclosed space, or not know that it’s rude and uncouth. The waidiren simply can’t understand why it’s a big deal, especially when it’s just a kid who can’t help himself and when he has to go, he has to go.

      So you have a dynamic here similar to when some mainland Chinese person does something similar in say Hong Kong or Taiwan. It’s again the “civilized” vs “uncivlized”.

      As for diapers, diapers are still fairly new and expensive to most Chinese people, especially in rural areas. It’s a luxury expense. Hell, even in the West, diapers make up a large portion of a baby’s expenses, so imagine how much less affordable it is to lower-income mainland Chinese. Of course, you can also claim they don’t use reusable cloth diapers either as many Westerners did in the past, preferring to run around commando with split pants, but you know, there are some arguable advantages to that.

      But diapers or not is kinda irrelevant, the main thing is about the propriety when and where one excretes waste or allows a child or pet to excrete waste. With increasing urbanization and modernization, it’s probably safer to say the rural public needs to be educated that one can’t excrete waste wherever they please for sanitation and hygiene reasons, and a sense of civic-mindedness. Education on respecting public goods in general would help too, but otherwise, this is a pretty stereotypical city-slicker vs. country-bumpkin scenario, a “how shameless are you to not own up to your ‘obvious’ mistake” vs. “how ‘obviously’ arrogant you are to make such a big deal.”

      • Paul Schoe

        Hi Kai, I often enjoy your calming remarks. An effort to put things into perspective. But sometimes you say something that surprises me.

        Your remark: “… has the benefit of avoiding the real criticism.” hits the nail exactly on the head. But what surprises me, is that you are surprised or irritated about that.

        Isn’t this how issues in China are almost always resolved? In a conflict, no leader (or police, or other authority) will take a real side. They will always try to diffuse it and eventually come up with something that avoids the real criticism. Since this happens so often, I’m surprised that you sound surprised / irritated about their effort to avoid the real problem.

        For me, there seems to be no right or wrong in China.
        There are just emotions and they need to be calmed down.
        Chinese justice in a nut-shell.

        • Kai

          I’m irritated, not surprised. The two words are quite different.

          I’m irritated with the tactic of mischaracterizing the criticism (or target of criticism) because it’s so dishonest, but I’m not surprised that people use this tactic. People use it all the time and hardly just in China. Sometimes they genuinely misunderstood what exactly the criticism is (or targeting) but often they’re intentionally playing stupid or trying to deflect/change the topic. Mischaracterizing a criticism is different from acknowledging it but then countercriticizing, which may be warranted sometimes.

          I don’t personally associate this sort of “mischaracterization of the argument” with China specifically or how issues in China are specifically resolved. You allude to some real world situations (leader, police, authority) but I’m not clear on what you’re referring to. Please feel free to elaborate on what you mean so I understand.

          Otherwise, I’m not immediately thinking of any specifically Chinese analogues to “you’re criticizing my actions as a parent, who can know better, but let me instead make it sound like you’re criticizing the actions of my child, who can’t reasonably be expected to know better…and it’s because I resent you being Shanghainese more than I care about whether or not the values behind your complaint have merit.”

          • Paul Schoe

            I was also irritated about it but I now try to immediately accept it one of the things that you seem to have to live with in China. Shrug my shoulders and live on.

            I find keeping the peace one of the most important aspects of resolving disputes here. It is not about who is right or who is wrong, but it is about calming people down. Culturally this is often presented as “making sure that nobody looses face.“.

            With my Western culture set, I have difficulties to accept that those Chinese people who say “it is only a child, let it pee“, really agree that children should pee everywhere. I believe more that they try diffuse to situation and, as you point out, try to push the focus from the behavior of the parents to the child. A let-nobody-loose-face-and-everybody-can-walk-away-happily attitude.

            In The Netherlands, we enjoy debating topics. With pleasure, we even defend an ‘indefensable’ side, just to further the discussion and come closer to a substantiated opinion.

            Here in China, large groups of people refrain from opinions about any topic that does not directly affect their own lifes. Whether it is architecture, politics, behavior of other people, or anything that they see on the street. They refrain from forming an opinion. Maybe because they don’t have one, or maybe because expressing an opinion means opening yourself to a potential other opinion and they are not used to dealing with such innocuous conflicts.

            When I see police solving conflicts on the street, they first of all do not take any steps until the conflict has the risk of escalating. And once they do take steps, it is directed on calming down all people. It doesn’t matter which party is ‘right’ or ‘wrong’, the ‘harmonious society’ goes first and prevails above justice.

            PS: contrary to you; I highly correllate this attitude with China. I have not seen any other society where they dance so much around a subject. They prefer “no solution” above “facing topics/conflicts” at almost any time.

          • Germandude

            Let me applaud you for your last 2 comments. I couldn’t have said it better.
            I think in Europe, 2 people can discuss with completely different opinions. Let’s say 1 defending death penalty and 1 against it. These 2 can normally go into a heated debate over hours without coming to a conclusion whereas one changes his standpoint like let’s say the one against death penalty suddenly supporting that idea. What however happens most of the time is that both parties learn the standpoint of each other and can sympathize with reasons of the other party and reflect their own opinion on that. Like let’s say “Maybe I don’t agree with ihm but he had a good point”.
            In China however, I mostly see that people have their views and the moment they figure that the other party doesn’t share this view, it’s either a “walk away from discussion” or “defend your poinrt on hardcore mode and absolutely disregard anything the other person says”.
            No reflection afterwards on anything because the conclusion will always be “I am right and he is a retard”.

            Ben je Nederlands?

          • Paul Schoe

            Ja ;-)
            En jij, een Duitser die Nederlands spreekt/schrijft?

            It is indeed frustrating this “I am right and he is a retard” attitude. You just (almost) give up discussing anything with anybody because either you fully agree (no discussion necessary) or you disagree and then they either ignore anything that is being said or they “walk away from the discussion“, so you end up none the wiser.

            Maybe it is part of their education. There are no evolving opinions, because there is only one correct opinion and that is the one from your superior.

          • Germandude

            Ik heb in Nederlands gestudeert. Maar op Engels. Mijn nederlands is niet meer zo goed maar ik begrijp het meeste omdat ik ook naar de nederlands grens leve. Dat terwijl ik niet in China ben…

          • biggj

            SHOOT HIM!!! He’s speaking in tongues. ahhaha

          • Germandude

            ???

          • Paul Schoe

            Leuk,een Duitser die in Nederland heeft gestudeerd. Hoe is je Chinees? Nog beter dan je Nederlands?

          • Germandude

            Nee. Ik spreek een beetje Chinees maar niet veel…God verdomme ;-)

          • Kai

            Isn’t keeping people calm universally applicable in resolving disputes?

            Thanks for elaborating on what you mean. I think I understand what you’re saying better now.

            In response, I’m not entirely sure the shifting of focus from the parents to the child is a conscious effort to diffuse the situation by giving the parents a way out without losing face. I mean, I can see how that works, how someone might do that, but I’m not inclined to see most people thinking so elaborately (or cleverly), especially when commenting on the internet.

            To support that opinion of mine, it seems a lot of the Chinese comments that do this (shift the blame onto the child) are combined with counter-criticisms against the other side. If they were intent to allow everyone to walk away happily without feeling a loss of face, they wouldn’t that be counterproductive? The comment by skylin is I think the more common way to diffuse both sides without escalating accusations.

            I don’t share your generalizations about the Netherlands or the Chinese. In my experience, it’s just different types of personalities. Some people like debating while others don’t. Sometimes the context makes it clear that it’s just debate for debate sake and nothing personal. Other times it isn’t so clear. Too many confounding factors for me to generalize so broadly.

            I can however empathize with the notion that Chinese may be more reticent when it comes to getting involved in what they may consider other people’s affairs. I can empathize but honestly, it’s not that unique to Chinese people either. It’s frankly pretty human and every language has well-worn phrases for stuff like “mind your own business” and “don’t get involved”, etc.

            I can’t empathize with your notion that Chinese people refrain from forming an opinion though. They certainly form opinions but may vaguely differ on when and how they might express it. Some of it is vaguely based on cultural norms of what is polite conversation or context.

            For example, I think many Americans would think asking if someone of the opposite gender has a boyfriend/girlfriend to be reasonably innocuous, that it’s a mundane question when making conversation to get to know a person better in casual situations. Many Chinese however interpret it as a very personal question, and you asking it indicates you have a serious romantic interest in them. Of course, there are exceptions and diversity but this is a generalized cultural diffference that I’ve observed. Neither is wrong, it’s just a different norm. So just because Chinese people don’t voice an opinion in certain things hardly suggests they don’t form opinions. There’s a time and place for things, and it may just be different based on one’s personality or background.

            Next, I don’t find your description of the way police handle conflcts on the street in China to be weird or even undesirable. It seems rather prudent. Give people a chance to sort things themselves on their own, right? Maybe intervention isn’t necessary. If things do escalate, calming them down also makes sense. Is it prudent to take a side when the police may not know the entire story? When they can’t make an informed opinion about right or wrong?

            Broadening this method of intervention and dispute resolution into “harmonious society” vs. “justice” isn’t really fair either. There are better examples of where social stability was valued over justice than this description of how police officers in China handle conflicts on the street. Off the top of my head, silencing victims or those with grievances in order to prevent wider public outrage would be one.

            Before we get too far off our original discussion, let me try rephrasing what you’re trying to say and you can tell me if I’ve got it or not. It sounds like you’re trying to say overall social stability is valued over individual justice, a variation of the collective vs. individual argument. If this is so, what I’m confused about is how this specifically relates to the tactic of “mischaracterizing the criticism”. How does QQ comments mischaracterizing the passengers as criticizing the baby instead of the parents relate to “valuing social stability over individual justice” or “keeping the peace, calming people done, regardless of who is right or wrong”?

            To me, mischaracterizing the criticism is often an attempt to simultaneously evade acknowledging fault and redirect censure. This isn’t uniquely Chinese nor does it serve as a meaningful example of how China values keeping the peace and maintaining social stability over individual right or wrong and justice. Have I misunderstood you? I thought you were building off and extrapolating from what I said about “mischaracterizing the criticism” but I don’t see the connection with your conclusions.

            Perhaps the tactic of mischaracterizing the criticism corresponds with an attitude in your mind that is different from the attitude I’m thinking of in mine. Are we still using the QQ comments as an exampe or are you bringing up a separate issue largely unrelated to the QQ comments?

            PS. I have a hard time generalizing Chinese society as nonconfrontational and prone to dancing around a subject. Off the top of my head, that sort of stereotype seems to apply more to Japanese society than Chinese. In truth, there’s just varying degrees depending on situation and subject. On some things, maybe the Chinese can indeed be generalized as being more prone to avoiding a topic/conflict than others, but not in other things. Chinese seem to be blunt and direct about certain things while evasive and shy about others. Perhaps you can narrow this down from an overly broad generalization to more specific types of topics or conflicts? Maybe then we can discuss those more in depth?

          • Paul Schoe

            Generalizing is always a difficult thing to do, because there are always hundreds, if not thousands of examples that counter a generalization. Yet nevertheless, after people visit a country, any country, not just China, they have an opinion about the country and about the people living there. Yes, they are generalizations, so one might object to such statements. But they are also based on observations. These statements are based on experiences and as such valid to be made.

            As such there are countries that people visit, and based on their experience they say that people like discussion and debating there. But I doubt if anybody visiting China, would say that of China.
            – – –
            My observation in China is that when there is a problem that affect persons; people do everything they can to make it not personal. There is a huge aversion to making somebody responsible for something. As such the comments on QQ about re-directing the attention from the parents to the baby, are the same as the decissions of the police not to interfere (which might require them to choose sides, to say somebody was wrong), as what I experience in meetings. They are all signs of the same thing: avoid appointing responsibility, avoid solving problems if it requires appointing responsibility for something that went wrong (unless when it is towards a lower level employee). Instead prefer it that everybody goes home ‘happily’ instead of solving a situation.

            I agree that those people in their QQ-remarks are not consciously shifting attention from the parents to the child, in order to not blame the parents. But to me that is a sign of how deeply this behaviour of ‘not assigning responsibility’ is ingrained in their behavior. It has become sub-conscious behavior to always go for peace, not matter what has been done.

            And that behavior is very unfair to the person(s) who suffered from a bad decission or action. Because these person(s) need support and sometimes a ruling. Not a let’s-shake-hands-and-forget-about-it attitude. That attitude rewards the bully.

            I understand that you feel that police is there to (only) calm down people and (only) interfere when things have the risk of escalating. I also understand why they do that in China. They want to minimise the risk of escalation, particularly when people might take a stand against the police. But I prefer a more pro-active role of the police.

            When I see public disputes in my country, and in my experience in most other Western countries, and the police arrives, then the police takes a pro-active role. They don’t just stand-by to see if the problem solves itself. They interfere AND they try to see what happened and who is right or wrong. I do expect them to choose a side and that is the side of what at that moment appears to be just.

            But as I stated in my first reaction:
            For the police in China there seems to be no right or wrong. They just need to keep things from escalating, chosing the morally ‘right’ side is not an factor to take into account. And the statements on QQ that shift the attention to the baby are symptoms of the same behavior: avoid appointing blame or responsibility.

          • Kai

            I absolutely agree that generalizations are inevitable and human. They are however still fallacies, conclusions arising from subjective experiences that may be subjectively offensive to others if not the self. So generalizations have their uses and its impossible to avoid them so long as the human mind processes data by differences and similarities, but it’s tactful and constructive to refine our generalizations rather than defend them as valid. After all, they may be “valid” conclusions based on your subjective observations (which may be confounded by a zillion things), but not objectively “valid” much less subjectively valid to the other person. It’s hard to have a productive conversation with another person if you can’t agree on a common premise.

            Defending a generalization instead of refining it to be acceptable by all involved ends up becoming a sort of obstinacy, an insistence that someone else eschew all they know and adopt your subjective worldview. Why do this? It doesn’t make sense except for preservation of ego.

            About people in China liking discussion and debate, I honestly don’t see it nearly so starkly different as you do. Maybe I know and encounter a lot of Chinese people who are perfectly fine with discussion and debate. I can point online and show you plenty of discussion and debate. Hell, part of cS’s appeal is that it makes a tiny piece of that discussion and debate in China accessible to non-Chinese readers.

            I am however inclined to agree that there is less (or more) discussion and debate about certain topics in China than other places. But this has never translated into a generalization of Chinese people liking discussion and debate less for me.

            LoL, my first thought in response to you saying people in China do everything they can to make problems not personal is: “What? They hella make things personal!” It’s clear we’re thinking of different things so that’s why it’s important for us to figure out what each of us have in mind when we say such things.

            I think you’ve taken a few instances or types of circumstances and broadened it into a generalization of conflict-avoidance, of “going for peace”, that no longer holds or reasonably describes the broader instances.

            For example, yeah, I can see people avoiding the assignment of blame or criticism in company meetings in China. You can look at that as not making someone responsible, but you can also see it as a calculation that doing so isn’t considered productive or perhaps does more harm than good. Maybe it’s out of respect and wider consideration, that public shaming or assignment of blame isn’t necessary, that it may even be petty. When I think about it and how this sort of behavior has so many arguments for and against, it isn’t foreign to people outside of China either.

            Norms of police intervention doesn’t strike me as particularly supportive of your conclusions either. I already mentioned some very good and true reasons for why police won’t rush to intervene or take sides in arguments or conflicts they witness. The people involved will always feel self-justified and find anything short of being sided with as further injustice. But that doesn’t mean this approach is wrong or to be condemned. Like I said, it may be quite prudent.

            Overall, I can certainly think of situations in China where I wish someone was held more responsible, but I don’t personally feel like there’s a “huge aversion” to doing so in China when I consider the larger diversity of conflicts that occur. People definitely make people responsible for things in China, which is why people here complain about others shirking responsibility or passing the buck. People certainly choose sides and say so and so was wrong. Maybe less so in certain situations and contexts (like business meetings between people who have to continue working together), but still not a “huge aversion” or stark difference from abroad.

            Don’t rush to agree with me that the QQ comments were not consciously shifting attention away from the parents to the child, because I didn’t say that. I said it irritates me because I think it is dishonest, which inherently means I think it could be conscious. I made allowance that it might not be, that some people might genuinely have failed to see who was really being criticized, but I didn’t say what you think you’re agreeing to. As such, I don’t see it as “sub-conscious behavior to go for peace, no matter what has been done”.

            skylin’s comment is an example of going for peace, of trying to move the argument beyond assignment of blame, but I don’t think it’s done out of an aversion to accord blame. It’s more like everything that needs to be said has been said, and people may be going too far. It’s more like: “If people put a bit more effort into giving each other the benefit of the doubt, there would be less conflict in the world”. Being able to see and communicate the bigger picture isn’t necessarily an aversion to make people responsible. In a way, it actually is making people responsible for their part, contribution, or escalation in the mess.

            I get the feeling you’ve felt victimized in certain conflicts in China where perhaps the authorities didn’t handle things the way you preferred. I’m not going to say there isn’t injustice in China because there sure is a lot of it, but I’m not persuaded of your generalization that Chinese people have an aversion to making people responsible. It’s just too big of a generalization that doesn’t accurately reflect everything except a limited number of situations.

            But don’t get me wrong. I totally empathize with how someone who considers themselves the victim would feel unsatisfied, frustrated, even resentful. It’s kinda like being upset at your mom for not taking your side in a fight with your brother: “But MOM, he started it!”

            More often though, I think this is simply because a person is refusing to get involved in something they can’t make a fair decision in OR they’ve gone with certain prejudices. For example, in the QQ comments, it’s arguable that a lot of people resent arrogant Shanghainese people more than they care about whether pissing in the subway is proper or not, so they come down defending the parents/kid and criticizing the other passengers. But they’re not holding a person responsible here because they’re biased, not because they’re trying to save face for everyone so everyone walks away happy. They’ve picked a side. So aren’t these QQ comments at odds with the generalization you’ve brought up?

            Your generalization about the police in China also seems to be built off a certain type of situation rather than a common handling of a majority of situations. Certain situations require the cops to proactively mediate, others don’t. Sometimes inaction from the cops IS itself a form of taking a side, right? There are biased and unjust cops inside and outside of China. To accuse the cops of having an aversion to making people responsible, you have to assume they have the same information, values, and priorities as you do, that they arrived at the same conclusion but consciously decided not to do anything about it. That’s a high bar to meet. Occam’s Razor, there are simpler reasons and explanations.

            Again, I think I understand your emotions, but I don’t think your conclusion or generalization actually fits well overall. You may certainly be right about certain instances and situations, but I think you’ve broadened it too far.

            I think you have to consider that what you see as right and wrong may not be what they see as right and wrong. It may be that they don’t have the same information you do, or the same values, but I’m quite certain that people in China have a sense of right and wrong just like everyone else in the world. As for the statements on QQ that shif tthe attention to the baby, I still don’t see them as symptoms of the behavior you describe. To me, they’re effectively absolving the parents and blaming the other passengers for making a big deal out of what they consider to be nothing. They hold the passengers responsible for the incident. They think it is the passengers who are making trouble. To them, the child pissing is a non-issue. It’s the other passengers being petty and prissy.

          • Paul Schoe

            It might be that you are right, and that the comments are meant to say that the other passengers are beign petty and prissy. I look at this through Western glasses and cannot imagine that so many people would find this acceptable behavior. But maybe my Western glasses are too coloured to see that that many would accept that and even feel called upon to tell others that they shouldn’t make such a fuss about it.

            A pity for the person whose trousers were wet though. I wonder how these same people would react when it were their trousers that were wet with pee, but that is another topic.

            On your personal note: I am in the lucky situation that I don’t have to feel victimized yet. But I have seen many situations where the love of the greater good (keeping the peace), goes at the expense of the individual.
            So I was happy to read that the people on the Underground did not ignore the situation but basically defended the victim (the person whose trousers were wet) because, as said before, if keeping peace is more important then what is just and right, then the bullies become the big winners.

          • Kai

            I think the “maintaining social stability” argument has been abused way too much in China, but I usually see it with regards to larger political/governance situations rather than mundane interpersonal conflicts.

            Knowing that we have colored glasses is a good thing, especially if we’re genuinely interested in trying to understand why something happened or is the way it is. Self-awareness for the win!

    • Stu

      In my experience it’s a fairly specific thing- most Chinese people, even people who object to random litter dropping, genuinely do not see baby pee or crap as a problem at all. I don’t even think there’s much of a rural/urban divide to it- it’s very widely accepted. To my mind it’s just an interesting feature of the culture, really- sure, you can criticise, but then you go out in England and see people letting their dogs piss on the pavement (and crap there, if the area doesn’t clearly indicate penalties for not picking it up), and you realise that China ain’t that unique. It just happens with babies rather than dogs.

      • Paul Schoe

        Nice observation. We accept the dogs, but not the child.
        Although I expect that people would even object fiercer when somebody let their dog pooh or peeh in the Underground.

  • David S.

    If Hell goes green, you’ll get there by Chinese subway. Probably somewhere on the Beijing line 13.

  • Badgerleftshitholesohappy

    And no one mentions this is Shanghai, supposedly the most westernised and prosperous of all China ! Greater openness for over a third of a century, but still they piss n spit everywhere, all ages, even another 3rd century passes and you will prob still see this. No advancement there, 5000yrs of their civilisation sees them still eating with two sticks !

    • maja

      I like chopsticks.. they’re the best to pick up small mouthfuls from different dishes.

    • Kai

      That’s like bashing Los Angeles on the basis of its Mexican immigrant population. Shanghai (and many of its native denizens) is better than much of China with regards to many things, but it still has a large population of people who migrated, often recently, from less developed, less “Westernized” parts of China.

  • the ace of books

    Ladies! Gentlemen! This is jsut hte logical outcome of two things together:

    Babies Peeing On The Streets Culture + Entitlement Culture

    How? Well, we’ve all seen the babies-being-peed-in-public thing. (Sometimes not even babies.) Sure, it saves money on nappies, but it’s also the allowance of performing bodily functions in public, which, taken to an extreme, is this.

    Add that into entitlement culture that, I’m afraid, is both rampant and recently growing in China. “How dare you tell me not to do this thing! You should mind your own business and not cause trouble!” It’s like the opposite of face, or maybe it’s schmearing the face on too thick. I’m not sure.

    Finally, I’m surprised, or maybe not, how many people let it go as “just baby pee”. Yes, pee is sterile and has been an indregiant of ancient et ceteras — but it’s pee. You don’t exactly go whipping your urinator out and raining it around, so why allow your child to?

  • moody

    “motherfucker” and “fly kicking”
    Plus the very classy Finger Pointing when angry
    you gotta love it

  • PixelPulse

    Are diapers expensive in China or are Chinese too lazy to buy them or something? Plus if you let your kid pee on a crowded train, you should expect people to get upset with you.

    • Jahar

      cheap, not lazy.

    • I love Sexy Chinese girls

      Diapers are not expensive. Chinese are just cheapos.

      • Probotector

        I once heard about an American couple who had a kid over here in China, and Chinese women called her a lazy mother for using diapers, even though you’d think that the whole split pants thing would seem to be the lazier option. Go figure.

    • Kai

      They’re expensive relative to average purchasing power, and they don’t have decades of popularized use because they were too poor for it in decades past. If you watch some mainland Chinese TV serials, the ones featuring a young couple and their parental units, the plot will often involve an argument between the young mother and her mother or mother-in-law about the convenience vs. cost of using disposable diapers. The young mother will argue its convenience and modernity while the parent will argue how it’s expensive and wasteful.

      Those of us from the West take disposable diapers for granted. We grew up with them. Most mainland Chinese haven’t. You’ll see a lot of diaper advertising in cities nowadays though. As China gets richer, they’ll start adopting more of the consumption habits the West has, for better or worse.

      The problem with parents of this background is that they may very well NOT expect that people would get upset with them letting their kid take a wee. They might not expect it precisely because where they’re from, the people they were surrounded with, didn’t think it was a big deal. They’re like the ignorant “boorish” Chinese tourists visiting foreign countries, unaware and insensitive to local customs and norms. There’s a gap between their norms and the norms of Shanghai locals. The best we can hope for is that this experience might give them some awareness that their habits aren’t actually acceptable everywhere. Unfortunately, they might just think they’re being oppressed and looked down on. Never underestimate defensiveness, as you can see from the translated comments above.

  • vincent_t

    plastic bag??!!! Can’t they just get off at the next stop?
    And that is a baby? It looks more like a toddle who should have known how to say “pee pee” already.

  • Mighty曹

    I so want to give that fuck-face a flying kick.
    Acting like some big shot triad boss calling for reinforcement. LMAO! If he were he wouldn’t be riding the subway.

  • The Enlightened One

    LoL, how can anyone act tough when they are sporting hair and pants like that?

    Is it to power up his flying-woman-dive-kick?

    • Germandude

      Look at the first picture, the one in the middle. That facial expression, like he is really trying to get his 2 braincells to come up with sth…

    • Mighty曹

      He’s just practicing his acting for a minor role in some low budget gangster movie.

  • I love Sexy Chinese girls

    The child’s mother that had largely stayed silent throughout the entire incident finally opened her mouth, saying: “If you have the guts, fight yourself, don’t call people”

    He should be embarrassed by this. hahaha.

    • vincent_t

      I hope I don’t see another clip tomorrow showing this guy beating up his wife like a shit. Sigh.

      • I love Sexy Chinese girls

        It seems chinese men are good at beating their women.

        • The Enlightened One

          I think this one can hold her own.

          At 1:40 in the video she elbows him in the chest to calm him down and later she basically calls him a coward for calling up his friends.

          I think he is just an insecure little punk and she wears the pants. Like I said in a previous posting… the women in China are a lot tougher than the men.

          • Mighty曹

            She wears the pants and he’s wearing her old pants.

          • Scream_Writer

            what kind of pants are you wearing, mighty?

          • the ace of books

            in b4 “he’s not wearing pants”

          • Mighty曹

            Shit, my web cam is on?

          • Scream_Writer

            No :(

          • Scream_Writer

            hahaha, an oldie but a goodie!

          • Mighty曹

            I wear the most comfortable ones.

          • I love Sexy Chinese girls

            Absolutely agree with you.

  • Trouse

    fucking shit, if i’m that child i would rather die to have such parents! i would be like, everytime i see my parents hairstyle i pee a lot!

  • Dax

    Everybody’s saying “Oh, he’s just a baby, he can’t hold it!” but I’d bet the dad was holding his little legs apart, whistling to try to encourage the kid to pee. I’ve had that happen on my foot on a bus here, but since I’m here in redneck (yellowneck?) central china, nobody else seemed to share my anger.

    • Cauffiel

      hahaha… I always laugh when I see those morons whistling to provoke urination. morons!

      • mr.wiener

        What do you do, punch them in the face and yell: “Pop goes the weasel !” ?
        It’s a cultural thing dude.

        • Cauffiel

          I know its a cultural thing, dude. And its stupid. Babies don’t give a good goddamn about a high pitched squeal buzzing in their ears. They’re gonna go when they’re gonna go.

          • maja

            b-b-but it works.

          • Kai

            Really? I’ve never really understood the whistling thing either but I know a lot of people (not just Chinese) who do it. Like Cauffiel, I don’t understand how whistling helps encourage urination.

            Then again, I guess if I think about it more, perhaps you can use it as part of conditioning. Maybe the whistling doesn’t initially help the kid pee but after whistling is repeatedly associated with peeing, then whistling could prompt it. Kinda like associating lying in bed with sleeping.

          • KAMIKAZIPILOT

            Never understood why people whistle. Worst are those that whistle at the urinal, or even while walking. Why whistle anywhere? What purpose does it serve? It’s a little creepy, I don’t care what culture you’re from. Kai do you whistle?
            Disclaimer: I can’t whistle no matter how hard I try, maybe if I could I’d feel more manly :(

          • Kai

            LoL, it’s just a form of music? It’s like, why do people hum? Or sing?

            Apparently whistling in general is considered rude in China and I’ve never really understood it. I mean, obviously you don’t whistle for no reason in certain settings or situations (like a funeral?) but I never knew whistling was frowned upon in general, even if you’re just walking around enjoying a nice day, skip-a-dee-doo-dah-skip-a-dee-day’ing.

            Or have I been misinformed about this? Quick, ask your nearest mainland local and let me know!

            In the US, whistling is pretty commonplace, whether it be while walking, driving, working, pissing, etc. I couldn’t whistle when I was young but like swimming, one day I suddenly figured out how. I can’t do the really piercing ones though, or how some people can put like two fingers in their mouth and blow out eardrums in a 10 mile radius.

          • KAMIKAZIPILOT

            Yeah, I guess it can be considered a form of music. I never knew whistling was frowned upon in China, lol. I don’t know about whistling being common in the U.S., depends by your definition of “common”. I don’t think I will ever be able to whistle, I’ve been trying for years, no sound at all comes out, maybe my lips are deformed, lol. I have no idea how some people do those loud whistles, I’d love to be able to do that

          • Kai

            Heh, common enough that I wouldn’t find a person whistling to be strange. I’m getting images of whistling in tv shows in my head at the moment.

          • mr.wiener

            Whistling is a big no-no during Ghost month, especially if you are near a hospital or graveyard.

          • Kai

            Interesting, I’m guessing it’s some superstition about attracting ghosts or something.

          • Cauffiel

            Oh, god, please say you are joking. Do you believe in rain dancing too?

      • Stu

        You call them morons, but do you actually know it doesn’t work? When you need to pee, you avoid thinking of rushing water, right? I’ve definitely seen babies apparently respond to it very quickly- it might well work as a form of conditioning.

        • Cauffiel

          Conditioning only works if there is a stimulus (reward) and response. Whistling to make a baby piss doesn’t involve a stimulus.

          I do not believe the sound of rushing water encourages urination in adults. Just a pop culture myth.

  • B*tches, Leave

    If they don’t mind standing in their own filth, then who cares …

  • Funny how everyone here knows exactly what to say, but I bet only a very few of you have ever said something whenever you found yourselves in such situation, which should be plenty if you live in China. And some of the Chinese guys here find some things “despicable” but they know very well they will get bitchslapped and grounded without playing “Crossfire” for months if they ever criticize grandpa about ANYTHING. (I suppose the easiest way to criticize parenting in China would be picking on their dirty little habits)

    Shanghai or Beijing are not ALL China. Congratulations for all the development and shopping malls but please don’t pretend to be so civilized. In most places outside any Chinese metropolis a lot of people still take shits on the street. And I know it’s something people is working on, but for those very hard working 山炮 is really hard to catch up with you iPhone-dependent and unfriendly big city people.

    (note: “Crossfire” is a Counter-Strike Chinese rip-off)

    Edit: Some of the Chinese guys I mentioned before even peed and shat a whole lot in the streets when they were kids… forgive them, they forgot about it.

    I think things would have gone better only if they treat each other better.

    • maja

      I remember patting the back of a kid who was about to take a pee in the street in central Beijing. his mother/auntie laughed and went away a couple steps and the kid trottled after her incapable of taking the piss even when she commanded him to do it again.
      on the other side I remember some kids running away from their courtyard to take a piss under a freeway bridge, daring each other. always in Beijing.
      BUT, this-is-in-the-subway!!!!

      • maja

        and the same would be true for any public place…

      • I actually taught three grannies that the kids can go to the toilet before class but there’s no need to do it RIGHT ON THE FUCKING DOOR. THERE’S A FUCKING BATHROOM INSIDE. More annoying was my Chinese colleague’s indifference. God Bless you 东北, over there pee stays frozen most of the year.

      • so does that mean chinese pee has no limits? xD

  • mattman_183

    D-I-A-P-E-R….There has got to be some traditional stuff behind why more people don’t use them. Like its bad for virility or something not to let it be free. Are they too expensive?

    …Or maybe its just that alot of people here really don’t want to change a diaper. Probably the same people who pick up their dog’s shit.

    Civic responsibility suffers when public cleaners do their jobs too well.

    • in fact Diapers are a big problem when it comes to recyclable waste. It’s really hard for recycling plants to separate the materials of the diapers, which make the process expensive and slow, and with very little real results. Man was not made to live in cities, we’ve been tricked to believe we need to.

      on the other hand, diapers are expensive in China. I believe diapers are useful when you take your kid outside with you, otherwise just teach the little mofo’ to use his potty or wait until we find a toilet.

      • maja

        diapers may be not the best solution for the personal hygiene of the kids, but having your kid piss on the subway…

        • might not be the best solution for their time being in that place.

    • Chinese

      Poor migrant workers can’t afford diapers.

  • mattman_183

    That being said, maybe he was behind a rock and a hard place. Did his wife feel insulted? If so, he’s going to have to stand up for her no matter how wrong he knows it was. Still, might not be the case because he’s kicking women. The hell? Went way too far.

    • Kai

      I think it’s just defensiveness, maybe even feeling a bit cornered, as waidiren often feel when surrounded by scrutinizing Shanghainese. I can understand feeling defensive, but he handled it really poorly, kicking a woman and then escalating into calling his “boys”.

      The wife perhaps handled it better, just accepting the complaints/criticisms and looking ashamed or at least chastised. Then again, we don’t know what was going on before the video began, like what and how much was already thrown at them. Maybe the husband thought the chastising had gone too far for his tolerance or something. Or maybe he just handled it really poorly.

      The older man that seems to have been with them was reasonably calm for most of it, trying to get both sides to shut up already, but I guess he got fed up in the end too.

  • Wing the Wong Number

    You can take the peasants out of the fields, but you just can’t house train the fuckers. I’d like to go and piss on the floor in their house and see how they like it.

  • narsfweasels

    The guy’s father later apologised on the nightly news. The father of the child did not apologise himself.

  • SixAces

    I love it when people take their phones out and call their buddies… Do all the wanna be tough guys really assume someone is going to sit there and wait 20 minutes to an hour for their posse to come continue the fight? I always assumed that people like that are just dialing a random number and sending empty threats.

  • its just triad member’s way of marking their territory. Primitive and effective. lol

  • xiaode

    I don´t know what to say about this incident…

    … just: my congratulations to the girl who married such an idiot / asshole… hahaha… really? serious? there are so many men in China and you married that one… and even gave him a child…? hahaha….

    a guy who needs to call his friends to beat up a woman… hahahaha….

    .. but from her sentence: “If you have the guts, fight yourself, don’t call people” … i think she knows it…

    hahaha…

  • that guy

    the Chinese comments are ridiculous. “it’s just a child, so let it pee…not worth getting into arguments over…Let the cleaning lady mop it up”. Its exactly that kind of complacency that brings down this country. How about some basic hygiene, common decency, and attention to the public welfare. Bravo to those passengers who decided not to be complacent and speak up. Just because one has a child, does not entitle them to let their children urinate on people’s belongings and clothing. Allowing that kind of behavior immediately begs the question as to what else parents think they can get away.

    As other comments already affirmed, buy a goddamned diaper. Can’t afford it? Then forego buying a smart-phone or other “face-showing” bullsh*t and use that savings to purchase things that actually allow you to function as a basic citizen in society.

    • mr.wiener

      You don’t belong here, your comments are far too sensible and reasonable!…..Well we’ll see how long it lasts ;)

      • xiaode

        … he don´t understand Chinese culture…
        5000 years of history… and so on.. and so on…

        • Zappa Frank

          5000 years of history and still barbarians!!

          • W4rb1rd

            And fuckin’ PEASANTS!

        • that guy

          5000 years of history…and what do you have to show for it. stagnation

          • mr.wiener

            What do you have to show for it?
            …..Urination.

          • POS

            thats 100 million years of evolution we have to thank for urination. 5000 years of culture is training on using your evolutionary processes in the proper place/context.

          • mr.wiener

            Thank goodness mammals don’t have a hole that does everything. Having a cloaca is for the birds.

          • The Enlightened One

            Hahaha….

            “We have been peeing on each other for 5000 years, why stop now!”

          • xiaode

            Ok.. let´s see.. that´s a tricky question because my country.. or better my nation is less then 150 years old.
            But we already managed to have:
            * something like a state which acts under the rule of law (at least most times)
            * more or less very high standards for human rights, free speech, freedom of press and all that shit
            * a social insurance system and (free) health support for all people, even the poor ones…
            * a school and education system which educates people good enough that my country is a leader in technology (thats all the shit you just copy here)
            * … and last but not least people know that they should not pee or shit inside elevators, subways or just somewhere on the street…

            (sorry, that was a little bit too much maybe, pls. excuse me… but i couldn´t resist…)

          • Robert Rou

            “or better my nation is less then 150 years old”

            What country is that?

            “a school and education system which educates people good enough”

            Apparently not good enough.

            “that my country is a leader in technology”

            China has nukes, independently designed by its own scientists. Yours?

          • xiaode

            “China has nukes, independently designed by its own scientists. Yours?”

            This is something you are proud of? Seriously???

          • Robert Rou

            Uh…. it’s a scientific achievement, I would think.

          • xiaode

            Sure… it is.. but if you take a closer look:
            China developed this technology – according to my info – in the mid 60s (1964). All other nuclear powers already had this technology at that time. And the real developments and achievements took place somewhere else… (it´s not that they invent this technology….)

            But I guess we are a little bit off topic now… far way to go from a father who thinks it´s normal that children pee in a subway to the invention of nuclear bombs…

          • Mateusz82

            I really doubt that you would think. Especially if you really believe that China has independently designed nukes.

          • wongasu

            china’s nuke was given or taught by Sovyet, China most achievements are just stealing other country tech and claim it as their own.

          • Robert Rou

            Source/link? Particularly in regards to the Yu-Deng design.

          • donscarletti

            I’m guessing he’s Canadian, judging by the 150 year figure. Canada was a fairly major contributor of facilities and scientists in the Manhattan Project, hosting research at Chalk River Labs and Heavy Water production in Trail BC. On top of this much of the fuel used in the two bombs used in WWII was mined in Canada.

            Canada is also the second country on earth to have a working nuclear reactor.

            So, yeah, Canadian research and industry built nukes back in 1945, long before China or anyone had them. These nukes also happened to save China from Japanese tyranny, something that the Chinese nukes were far too late to achieve.

        • Mateusz82

          Exactly. “5,000 years of history” is the answer to everything.

          Beijing’s air literally will kill you? “5,000 years of history”
          Police watching a girl get stabbed to death? “5,000 years of history”
          Education system that actively kills independent thinking? “5,000 years of history”

    • Blarsd

      What might bring down this country is this “In 2004 China surpassed the United States as the world’s largest waste generator, and by 2030 China’s annual solid waste quantities will increase by another 150% – growing from about 190,000,000 tons in 2004 to over 480,000,000 tons in 2030.” This world bank report is a bit old, done 2005. You can read here http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTEAPREGTOPURBDEV/Resources/China-Waste-Management1.pdf
      adding diapers to this will surely bring em down.

      I do agree to that people should take care of hygiene and behave and be polite in public, I have myself been pissed on in Shanghai at a McDonalds by an adult. Few people in China has grown up with diaper and can’t see the benefit of using them and for some people getting food on the table is far more important than buying diapers.

      There are many things in China that could be taught in school, and I wish they would, like how to behave in public, hygiene and so on but here teaching history is more important in their eyes.
      We just have to realize that this country just 30 years ago was a farmers society. Our countries in the west a bit over a hundred years ago was filthy as well but gradually we got better and I’m sure so will China, it just needs more than thirty years, maybe a couple of generations or so.

  • manujoro

    I’m trying to look at the positive side of this story. Most of the people on the train found that wrong and said what they think. There will always be pricks like these two, but it seems there is hope.

    • maja

      even more: 《 the child’s mother that had largely stayed silent throughout the
      entire incident finally opened her mouth, saying: “If you have the guts,
      fight yourself, don’t call people” 》

    • Klee

      Agree. Hope exists. The other day while waiting for the bus, an old lady started prepping her vegetables on the sidewalk, throwing the discarded leaves on the ground. Another old lady spoke up, “Hey! Don’t throw those down , put them in the trash can, it’s right there (it was)”, she did…not with a great big smile, but she did. Malatang for the soul right there, I tell you!

  • Cauffiel

    nation of losers.

    • mr.wiener

      Based on this family? Yes. Based on the other people on the train? That would be a no. Even his wife wasn’t completely lacking to common sense.

      • Cauffiel

        Based on…. nearly everything published on chinasmack over the past 5 years? Yes.

        But sure, lets all applaud and pat the backs of people who expressed displeasure at being peed on. They’re heros.

        • mr.wiener

          I sometimes visit a site called “White watch” , full of the most disgusting stories and gross generalizations about “White trash crackers” and “cavewomen”.
          If all these stories were to be believed and if they applied to caucasians as a whole than we are truly doomed.
          I’ve since learnt that the sites is run as a piss-take by a bunch of jewish guys, but it does make you think.
          No one likes being peed on.

          • Cauffiel

            Oh, man, I’m pretty sure I can find you lots of videos online that will prove there are plenty of people who enjoy being peed on. :-D :-D

          • mr.wiener

            Oh you dog! ha ha!

          • Kai

            I subscribe to “White Whine”.

            For me, nearly everything published on cS over the past 5 years has had something encouraging or reassuring in it, whether it was the story itself or the Chinese netizen discussion about it. Sometimes the discussion appears one-sided, yes, but mostly there’s something that confounds the notion that China is a nation of losers.

          • Cauffiel

            The further a nation’s laws/practices stray from employing its citizens based on merit, the closer you move to a Nation of Losers.

            China’s laws and practices miss this mark by…. a tremendous degree.

          • Kai

            I think you’re still trying to rationalize what you’d honestly admit to be an unfair hyperbole. China has an upsetting degree of nepotism and lack of meritocracy in many aspects of its society but it’s still hardly a “nation of losers”. It’s still a nation where some people have done incredible things and achieved success, while others have done incredibly terrible things and earned deserved infamy, but the vast majority of people are just trying to live their lives like the rest of the world. Why be so wed to that characterization?

          • Cauffiel

            Nope, not unfair hyperbole. But maybe less inclusive than you’re taking my comment to be. The people who represent China as a whole are grifters, con-men, bullies, mob bosses, and crime lords.

            Not sure what incredible things you’re referring to in recent history. The better part of the Chinese economy is based on two things: intellectual property theft and slave labor. What’s China invented in the past several hundred years? Nada.

            The terrible people who live in infamy… can’t think of any you might be referring to. Mao’s the baddest motherfucker in town and I’ve had more than a few students go out of their way to tell me how great he is. If you want to talk about China’s reputation, few people outside of China know about anyone but Mao.

            Don’t take it so hard man…. I’m a loser myself. But I come from a country where winners can be winners, and thats not something I can be proud of because I’m not a part of it, but I can respect it. China is a place where winners are persecuted and losers live in magnificent homes and get away with horrible crimes.

          • Kai

            Maybe those people “represent China as a whole” to you, or in certain circumstances or contexts. It is you who decides to make what is objectively a minority represent the majority in order to generalize an entire nation. Me saying that’s an unfair hyperbole was me trying to be generous.

            Why is invention the standard for “incredible things”? That’s an awfully narrow way of interpreting “incredible”.

            I mentioned people who live in infamy as a juxtaposition to people who have done incredible things, with the point being that no place has good without bad and bad without good. I’m not sure why you’re arguing that few people outside of China know about anyone but Mao. My statement didn’t establish what observer I’m talking about. I didn’t say “people who live in infamy in the eyes of people outside of China”. I said China is “still a nation where some people … have done incredibly terrible things and
            earned deserved infamy,” Pretty matter of fact.

            I don’t think of myself as a loser, at least not in a context similar to you as far as I know. By many measures, I’d probably be considered a “winner” in both China and my home country. Your characterization of China as a nation of losers gets muddled up here. If you say China is a nation of losers, are you saying losers are the majority and thus can be generalized to represent China? If so, are the majority of people in China living in magnificent homes getting away with horrible crimes? Likewise, what makes persecuted people “winners”? Are they winners because of something they did or simply because they’re persecuted? There’s a lot of imprecision in your words. I have suspicions of what you’re trying to say but I don’t see how your words here are effectively communicating that possible thought.

            I’ll say it again: China has an upsetting degree of nepotism and lack of meritocracy in many aspects of its society but it’s still hardly a “nation of losers”.

            Likewise, I can think of countries where there is a greater sense of meritocracy in society, but otherwise not really lacking in examples of people who seem to have and get away with more than they deserve in the eyes of many others.

  • kirk

    Wow……..

  • CrazyAssCity

    Not long ago I saw a grown up woman pull down her pants in the middle of a busy square and start peeing on the street. I really couldn’t believe what I was seeing. I regularly see babies pee everywhere including in the metro and in the airport, this is considered normal here. Welcome to Chongqing.

    • moldavidian

      You can see this in Qingdao too.

  • Klee

    I don’t get why people are going all “anthropological analysis” on this one. If you spill ANYTHING on ANYONE, coke, water, gutter oil, your knee-jerk reaction should be to apologize. If your pre-verbal kid does the spilling, you apologize for him. It’s three syllables. Utter them and call it good. All this intense debate about waidiren vs. Shanghairen, diapers vs. free rage pissing, and the comedy theater of his calling for reinforcements is kind of missing the mark…just like the kid’s pee. Manners, some people have them and some people don’t. They have those “female only cars” on some Japanese subways to thwart gropers. How about some “no problem with expelling bodily fluids only” cars here? Then all the spitters, shitters, pissers and pukers can ride together with their apologists and the rest of us can watch the “how to deal with rain” video in peace.

    • KAMIKAZIPILOT

      People are assholes and idiots the world over and I hate them all (the a-holes and idiots). What else is there to say.

      • Klee

        Judging by Kai’s dissertation, quite a lot. Guess you need your own car on the subway.

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